etym-

(Greek: truth, true meaning, real [the root meaning, true meaning or literal meaning of a word])

etym., etymol.
An abbreviation referring to etymological or etymology.
etymic (adjective)
1. Of or pertaining to the etymon or the primitive form of a word.
2. A foreign word from which a particular loan word is derived; for example, Latin tri, "three" is an etymon of English triple.
3. Relating to the etymon; as, "an etymic word" which is a simple form derived from the common element from which related words in several languages can be determined by linguistic processes.
etymograph (s) (noun), etymographs (pl)
A written rendition of the history of a particular grapheme (a written symbol that is used to represent speech) or an element of a grapheme.
etymographer (s) (noun), etymograhers (pl)
1. Someone who researches and writes about the historical accuracy of the origins, derivations, and spellings of words.
2. A person who studies the history of words by breaking them down into basic elements or by tracing them back to their earliest known structures and writing about the changes in their forms and meanings.
etymographic (adjective)
A reference to the historical accuracy of spelling or origins: "The etymographic approach to ancient symbols involves the method of producing or discovering additional levels of meanings by bringing into play the multitudes of readings a specific grapheme can have within the writing system to which it belongs."
etymographist (s) (noun), etymographists (pl)
1. A person who researches and writes about the historical accuracy of the origins, spellings, and derivations of words.
2. Anyone who studies the history of words by breaking them down into basic elements or by tracing them back to their earliest known structures and trying to explain the changes in their forms and meanings.
etymography (s) (noun), etymographies (pl)
1. The written historical accuracy of the origins and spellings of words.
2. The study of why characters are written as they are.
etymologe, etymologes; etymologed, etymologing (verbs)
1. To deduct the signification and the historical origins of words.
2. To trace or to derive the original meanings of words.
etymologer (s), etymologers (pl) (nouns)
1. A linguist who focuses primarily on the origins of words: "Etymologers provide interesting insights into popular cultures by showing the histories of their words."
2. Someone who traces the original sources of words: "A etymologer is interested in the socioeconomic and cultural value of words."
etymologic (adjective)
1. A descriptive term for the history of a particular word or element of a word.
2. A reference to the study of historical linguistic changes; especially, as presented in individual words.
etymological (adjective)
1. Relating to science of the origins and development of words. 2. A reference to or in accordance with the earliest known forms of words either in the same language or in ancestral ones from which other words in the same language are derived.
Etymological Analysis Quiz #1

Analysis of Etymologies, Quiz #1.

Etymological Analysis Quiz #2

Analysis of Etymologies, Quiz #2.

etymologically (adverb)
1. In an etymological manner.
2. According to or as regards etymology.
3. On etymological principles.
etymologicon (s), etymologicons (pl) (nouns)
1. An etymological dictionary or manual.
2. A work in which the etymologies of words are traced; an etymological dictionary.

Rooting Around with Etymology.

Learning Word Origins with Etymologies.


Other related "word, words" units: legi-; lexico-; locu-; logo-; onomato-; -onym; verbo-.