com-, co-, cog-, col-, con-, cor-

(Latin: together, together with, with)

The prefix com- is assimilated to co- before h, w, and all vowels:

The prefix com- becomes, cog- before g: cognition, [co + gnoscere, "to know"], et al.

The prefix com- becomes, col- before l: colloquial, et al.

The prefix com- becomes, con- before c, d, g, j, n, q, s, t, v: covivant, et al.

The prefix com- becomes, cor- before r: corrigible, et al.

The words for this unit show cartoons for all of the examples of the com-, co-, cog-, col-, con-, cor- entries; however, there are many more of them which exist in other units which are available when you type in a particular word in the search box at the bottom of this page.

abscond (verb), absconds; absconded; absconding
1. To go away hastily and secretly; to run away and hide; especially, in order to escape from the law: Last night several prisoners absconded from the prison camp and disappeared into the dense fog.

The goldsmith was absconding with all the gold that belonged to the customers; however, he was finally caught with a bag of stolen rings and necklaces.

Yesterday afternoon, a thief was seen absconding with the neighbor's money and jewels.

2. Etymology: from Middle French abscondre and directly from Latin abscondere, "to hide, to conceal, to put out of sight"; from ab(s)-, "away" + condere, "to put together, to store", from com-, "together" + dere, "to put".
To flee in haste and without telling anyone in advance.
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To depart or to leave secretly or suddenly.
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To secretly and suddenly go away or disappear.
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coalition (s) (noun), coalitions (pl)
1. An alliance, especially a temporary one, of people, factions, parties, or nations: The two countries formed a coalition because of the financial advantages for both of their economies.
2. An organization of people or countries that are involved in a pact or treaty; an alliance: Two nations agreed on peace and formed a coalition to strengthen their policies.
3. A combination into one body; a union: The two parties formed a coalition to govern the country.
4. The state of being combined into one body: The coalition of different animal protection groups has an important part in the politics of the country.
5. The union of diverse things into one body, form, or group; the growing together of parts: Many teachers, businessmen, doctors, and parents formed a coalition because they all had the same objectives to help develop a youth club for the children in their city.
6. Etymology: borrowed from Latin coalescere, "to grow together"; from co-, "together" + alescere, "to grow up".
A union or a temporary combination of people who want to take action against someone.
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coerce (verb), coerces; coerced; coercing
1. To force or cause to act or think in a certain way by use of pressure, threats, or intimidation; to compel: Thomas, who was quite lazy at home and had nothing really to do, was coerced into getting a job by his wife.
2. To dominate, restrain, or control forcibly by physical, moral or intellectual means: It is sad that some parents coerce their children by punishing them severely when they accidentally do something wrong.
3. Etymology: from about 1451, from Middle French cohercer, from Latin coercere "to control, to restrain"; from com-, "together" plus arcere, "to enclose, to confine, to contain, to ward off".
To restrain by force or to compell an action.
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coercive (adjective), more coercive, most coercive
1. Characterized by the practice of making a person do something in an involuntary manner by use of intimidation or threats or some other form of pressure: Simon was sent to the principal at school because of his coercive behavior on the playground towards his classmates.
2. A reference to using force or threats to make someone do something against his or her will: Greg was very coercive towards his sister, making her keep his secret of stealing money from the principal’s office, otherwise he would hide her cell phone.
A reference to a tendency to restrain by fear or by force.
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Relating to making people behave themselves..
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cogent (adjective), more cogent, most cogent
1. A descriptive term for appealing to the intellect or powers of reasoning; convincing: Sharon presented a cogent argument for raising the prices for the scarce items.
2. Etymology: from French cogent, "necessary, urgent" (14 century); from Latin cogentem , from cogere, "to curdle, to compel, to collect"; from com-, "together" + agere, "to drive".
Appealing or convincing to the mind.
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Having a compelling force.
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Having a powerful mental order.
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A significant reason.
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A convincing consideration.
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cogitate (verb), cogitates; cogitated; cogitating
1. To think deeply and carefully about something; to ponder: When James got back to the university dormitory, he sat at his desk and started to cogitate about the science project he was supposed to complete in three days.
2. To consider seriously; to reflect upon; to turn over in one's mind: When the election for President of the U.S. takes place, voters will be cogitating about which candidate will be the best one for the country.
3. Etymology: from Latin cogitatus, past participle of cogitare, "to ponder, to weigh, to reflect, to think", from co-, short for com-, "with, together" + agitare, "to put in constant motion, to drive, to impel"; from agere, "to set in motion, to drive, to lead".
To consider or to think about.
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To ponder or to meditate.
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cogitation (s) (noun), cogitations (pl)
1. Thoughtful and attentive consideration and meditation: After much cogitation and mulling over, James decided to take the offer of the job in his hometown.
2. A carefully and serious mental reflection about something: David applied all of his cogitation and energy, contemplating what topic he should take for the next term paper in his science class at school.
A thought or consideration.
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cognizance (KAHG ni zuhns) (s) (noun), cognizances (pl)
1. Conscious knowledge or awareness: The cognizance of the importance of the issue at hand was realized by the board of directors.
2. The range of what one can know or understand: Harriet's cognizance and perception of the nature of the species of the bird was quite amazing!
3. Observance; notice: The administrator will take cognizance of Jill's objections at the proper time.
4. In law, acknowledgment, recognition, or jurisdiction; the assumption of jurisdiction in a case: The court, being within cognizance, was able to act upon the case of murder without needing any further proof.
5. In heraldry, a crest or badge worn to distinguish the bearer: The knight was honored with a cognizance because of his bravery in battle.
6. Etymology: from Anglo-French conysance, "recognition"; later, "knowledge" from Old French conoissance, "acquaintance, recognition; knowledge, wisdom" (Modern French connaissance), from conoistre, "to know"; from Latin cognoscere, "to get to know, to recognize"; from com-, "together" + gnoscere, "to know".
Notice with perception.
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cognizant (KAHG ni zuhnt) (adjective), more cognizant, most cognizant
A reference to a person who knows or is fully aware of something: Hank was cognizant of the difficulty in completing the assignment that he gave to his workers.

James is cognizant of his responsibilities as the father of his two boys.

Fully informed and aware.
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Aware or informed of something.
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cognomen (s) (kahg NOH muhn) (noun); cognomina, cognomens (pl)
1. A family name or a surname: In current times, "Smith" is the cognomen for James Smith.
2. Any name; especially, a nickname: "Mike" is the cognomen for Michael.
3. The third and commonly the last name of a citizen of ancient Rome, indicating the person's house or family, as "Caesar" in "Gaius Julius Caesar" or "Cicero" in "Marcus Tullius Cicero".

The ancient Roman name, Publius Cornelius Scipio, presents "Scipio" as his cognomen.

The full name of the poet Virgil was Publius Vergilius Maro and Maro designates or specifies his cognomen.

A family name or a descriptive nickname.
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cohesion (koh HEE zhuhn) (s) (noun), cohesions (pl)
1. The action, or a condition, of uniting together: A social group, a chemical mixture, etc. are parts that make up a unified cohesion by holding together firmly or existing together without conflict.

If people want to maintain their cohesion, then they must not let minor differences of opinions interfere with their major objectives.

A written story whose facts all make sense and fit together has cohesion.

2. Particles of the same substance sticking together: Cake batter usually has cohesion because all of the ingredients are mixed together and cannot be separated again!.

Tar as a substance has cohesion and so does glue.

An act of uniting or sticking together and united as a group.
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cohort (s) (noun), cohorts (pl)
1. A band of soldiers: In times of war and peace, military cohorts are dedicated to supporting each other.

A cohort of three soldiers were wandering the countryside, hoping to find a place to sleep and food to eat.

2. Any group of associates: The Board of Directors for the company consisted of three cohorts who were employees; as well as, three cohorts who were elected to the Board.

Last week, the police arrested the local criminal leader of a gang and his cohorts.

3. Companions or followers: The dynamic priest had a cohort of believers who shared his enthusiasm for moral living and the worship of God.
4. A group of people sharing a common factor; such as, the same age or the same income bracket, especially in a statistical survey: A lack of focus was a common failure for students in a particular age cohort.
5. A disapproving reference to a supporter, an accomplice, or an associate of a leader; especially, someone to whom special treatment and preference is given: The police were observing the gang's leader and his cohorts.
6. Etymology: from Latin cohortem, accusative form of cohors, "enclosure"; with the extended meaning applied to "infantry company" in the Roman army (a tenth part of a legion, 400 to 600 men) by way of the notion of an "enclosed group, a retinue"; from com-, "with" + hortus. "garden".
A collaborator, a follower, or an accomplice working together.
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collaborate (verb), collaborates; collaborated; collaborating
1. To cooperate with another person, or group, in order to achieve something: Patricia and her family members collaborated with each other to decide on where they would spend their next vacation.
2. To work together, especially in a joint intellectual effort: The two writers collaborated on a novel which was finally completed and published.
3. To cooperate jointly on an activity; especially, to produce a mutual objective: The people working on this dictionary certainly are collaborating nicely to achieve its completion!
To work together; especially, in an inttellectual effort.

To work with another person.
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collateral (s) (noun), collaterals (pl)
1, In financial situations, property or goods used as security for a loan and forfeited if the loan is not repaid by the borrower: The Smith’s house was used as a collateral in case the debt they had with the bank was not paid back.
2. A relative descended from the same ancestor as another person but through a different set of parents, grandparents, and other earlier relatives: The inheritance went to Marilyn, the only survivor of the family who was an old lady; the collaterals were all very distant relatives and not directly akin to each other.
3. Etymology: from medieval Latin collateralis, literally "side by side with", from Latin lateralis, "on the side".
Property that is acceptable as security for a loan or other financial obligation.
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colleague (s) (noun), colleagues (pl)
Someone who is a fellow professional worker or a business partner: Colleagues are those who are explicitly united in a common purpose and who respect each other's abilities to work together to achieve their objectives.
An associate in the work place.
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A fellow worker in the same profession.
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Related "together" units: greg-; inter-; struct-.

There are additional units that include com-, co-, cog-, col-, con-, cor- entries which you can find by typing the word you are looking for when you open the Search Box below.