collo-, coll-, colla- +

(Greek: glue)

Don't confuse this collo, coll-, "glue" unit with the following -cole, -cola, -coles (living among, dwelling in); cole-, coleo- (sheath, scabbard, vagina); coll-, col- (neck); colo-, col- (colon, large intestine); and colon-, coln- (farm, settlement) units.

collagen, collagenous
Any of various tough, fibrous proteins found in bone, cartilage, skin, and other connective tissue of vertebrates. Boiling with water converts collagen to gelatin.

Collagens have great tensile strength, and provide these body structures with the bility to withstand forces that stretch them.

Collagens consist of three polypeptide chains arranged in a triple helix, and are bundled together in fibers. When boiled in water, collagen is converted into gelatin.

Collagen supplies the matrix in which the calcium salts that give the bones their hardness are deposited. Collagen is the substance of cartilage and tendon.

collagenase
A pancreatic enzyme that can break down collagen.
collaplankton
1. Planktonic organisms gaining buoyancy from gelatinous or mucous envelopes.
2. Plankton organisms that gain the physical capability of floating as a result of mucilaginous or gelatinous envelopes (surrounding or enclosing structures).
collenchyma (s) (noun), collenchymas (pl)
A layer of modified plant tissue immediately under the outer surface where the cells are thickened at the angles by a pad-like mass: "The collenchymas of plants consist of elongated living cells with primary cell walls that have irregular thicknesses."

"The tissues of collenchyma are usually located in the primary growth areas of stems and in some leaves."

colloblast
One of the adhesive cells on the tentacles of ctenophores that produce secretions helpful in the capture of prey.

ctenophore is any gelatinous marine invertebrate; also known as a "comb jelly" or "comb jellies". Comb jellies are voracious marine predators, feeding mostly on plankton.

Collagens have great tensile strength, and provide these body structures with the bility to withstand forces that stretch them.

Collagens consist of three polypeptide chains arranged in a triple helix, and are bundled together in fibers. When boiled in water, collagen is converted into gelatin.

Collagen supplies the matrix in which the calcium salts that give the bones their hardness are deposited. Collagen is the substance of cartilage and tendon.

collodion
A clear or slightly opalescent, highly flammable, syrupy liquid compounded of pyroxylin, ether, and alcohol, which dries to a transparent, tenacious film; used as a topical protectant, applied to the skin to close small wounds, abrasions, and cuts, to hold surgical dressings in place, and to keep medications in contact with the skin.
colloid
A substance that is in a state between that of a solution and an emulsion, where particles are suspended in a fluid medium.

Collagens have great tensile strength, and provide these body structures with the bility to withstand forces that stretch them.

Collagens consist of three polypeptide chains arranged in a triple helix, and are bundled together in fibers. When boiled in water, collagen is converted into gelatin.

Collagen supplies the matrix in which the calcium salts that give the bones their hardness are deposited. Collagen is the substance of cartilage and tendon.

colloidogen
A substance capable of giving rise to a colloidal solution or suspension.