ob-1 +

(Latin: toward, to, before)

Before c, ob- becomes oc-; before f, ob- becomes of-; before g, ob- becomes og-; before p, ob- becomes op-; before m, ob- becomes o-

oblige
1. To require or constrain, as by law, command, conscience, or force of necessity.
2. To bind morally or legally, as by a promise or contract.
3. To place under a debt of gratitude for some benefit, favor, or service.
4. Etymology: "to bind by oath", from Old French obligier, from Latin obligare, from ob-, "to" + ligare, "to bind".

Main modern meaning "to make (someone) indebted by conferring a benefit or kindness" is from 1567; be obliged, "be bound by ties of gratitude" is from 1548. Obliging, "willing to do service or favors" is from 1632.

obsequious (adjective), more obsequious, most obsequious
1. Characterized by someone who is excessively obedient or who is too willing to comply with the wishes of another person: "The couple was served in the hotel by obsequious employees."
2. A reference to those who are overly eager to help or to obey anyone who is important or well known: "The famous singer was surrounded by obsequious fans who were willing to do almost anything that she wanted."
Complying or easily agreeing to any request by another person.
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Too eager to help or to obey another person.
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obstetrics
1. The branch of medical science concerned with childbirth and caring for and treating women in or in connection with childbirth.
2. Etymology: from about 1819, from obstetric, 1742; from Modern Latin obstetricus, "pertaining to a midwife"; from obstetrix (genitive of obstetricis), "midwife". Literally, "one who stands opposite (the woman giving birth)"; from obstare, "to stand opposite to".
obverse
1. The side of a coin, medal, flag, etc., that bears the principal design (opposed to reverse).
2. The front or principal surface of anything.
3. A counterpart.
4. Facing or turned toward the observer: "The obverse side of a statue."
obvert
To turn (something) so as to show a different surface.
offer (s) (noun), offer (pl)
1. The act of giving a person, or people, the opportunity to accept something: "James received a job offer to work with a computer company as a programmer."
2. An amount of money which someone is willing to pay for something: "Roland decided to wait for a better offer for his newly constructed house."
3. An opportunity to buy something at a price that is lower than it usually is: "The store said that there was a special offer for the items which is good only while they last."
offer (verb), offers; offered; offering
1. To give someone an opportunity to accept or to take something: "Sharon was offered a job in the bank; for which she was very grateful."

"The insurance company was offering the victims of the car accident a significant sum of money as compensation for their injuries."

2. To make something available or to provide and to supply something: "When James and Jane were tourists in New York, they couldn't find their way back to their hotel; so, a man offered to help them."
3. To say or to express something as an idea to be thought about or to be considered: "The author of the book offers another possible explanation for the economic situations that exist today."
4. To say or to give something; such as, a prayer, or a sacrifice, as a form of religious worship: "The minister asked his congregation to bow their heads and to offer a prayer of thanks to God."
offering (s) (noun), offerings (pl)
offertory