-ulous, -ulously

(Latin: a suffix; tending to do, inclined to; full of)

acidulous (adjective), more acidulous, most acidulous
1. Slightly sour, sourish, sub-acid; somewhat acidic: The salad chef created a tangy, acidulous dressing for the salad.
2. Cutting and sharp in speech or tone; harsh: Based on Cory's acidulous remarks, there were those who suspected that she was angry with the person she was referring to.
3. Etymology: from Latin acidus, "sour".
Sour in feeling or manner; biting, caustic.
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bibulous (adjective), more bibulous, most bibulous
1. Pertaining to the absorbent of moisture by a sponge, soil, etc.: Mike's mother used her bibulous materials to clean her house.
2. Relating to the addiction of or the excessive drinking and consumption of alcohol: Many people spent a bibulous evening celebrating the new year.

Several university students had a bibulous party after their graduation ceremony.

Many auto accidents are caused by bibulous drivers.

Overly fond of drinking alcoholic beverages.
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cavernulous
Full of little cavities or holes; such as, cavernulous metal.
circumnebulous (adjective), more circumnebulous, most circumnebulous
Relating to an area in the sky that is full of clouds.
credible, creditable, credulity, credulous
credible (KRED uh buhl) (adjective)
Believable, capable of being believed, or worthy of confidence; reliable: During the trial, Eloise was presented as a credible witness for the defense.
creditable (KRED i tuh buhl) (adjective)
Worthy of credit or praise for doing something: Winning the spelling match was the result of the creditable performance by all of the students.
credulity (kri DOO li tee) (noun)
A tendency to believe too readily: The police captain questioned the credulity of the new officer during the investigation of the crime.
credulous (KREJ oo luhs) (adjective)
Inclined to believe almost anything; gullible; naive: The credulous behavior of the young man who had just moved to the city suggested that he was naive.

With the appearance of credulous behavior, Miranda told a credible story of the school competition during which the students gave a creditable performance of a mystery play which stretched the credulity of the audience.

 
credulous (adjective), more credulous, most credulous
A reference to believing something too easily: When Susan received an e-mail stating that she had won an award of $10,000, she had a credulous feeling that it was true and so she revealed private data in order to collect the funds; all of which resulted her losing money when the sender used the information to withdraw cash from her account.
Gullible and easily fooled.
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Too inclined to believe without adequate evidence.
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credulously (adverb), more credulously, most credulously
A reference to being disposed to believe too readily; easily gullible.
credulousness (s) (noun) (no plural form)
crepusculous
1. Flying in the twilight or evening, or before sunrise; referring to certain birds and insects.
2. Pertaining to twilight; glimmering; hence, imperfectly clear or luminous.

Creatures that feed only in the twilight; such as, bats and owls, are called crepuscular.

cumulous (adjective), more cumulous, most cumulous
Descriptive of a pile or mound or a reference to something that is heaped up.
edentulous (adjective) (not comparable)
Referring to being toothless or having lost the teeth: Because of his age, the old edentulous cat also had to consume food that was in the form of a liquid; such as, ground up cat food mixed with a special milk which is safe for it to have in its meal. 
A mother is toothless.
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eglandulous
emulous (adjective), more emulous, most emulous
1. Referring to someone who is eager or ambitious to equal or to surpass others: In the sport competition of aquatic locomotion, Nils was certainly emulous in that he wanted to be the best swimmer!
2. Characterized or prompted by a spirit of rivalry: The two friends were both quite emulous, in that each one was trying to get the best grade in math of all the students in that class.
Ready to equal another person.
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emulously (adverb), more emulously, most emulously
1. Characterized as someone who is seeking to match or to rival another's achievement or performance.
2. Motivated or characterized by rivalry or imitation.
emulousness (s) (noun), emulousnesses (pl)
1. Desirous of equaling or excelling another person or other people.
2. Characterized or prompted by a spirit of rivalry.