popu-

(Latin: people)

ad populum
To the people.

Ad populum is intended for the ears of all the people, not just a limited or special few.

argumentum ad populum
An argument appealing to the interests of the populace.
aura popularis
The popular breeze.

Cicero's expression for the public's favorite at a particular time; also translated as, "Temporary celebrity".

depopulate (verb), depopulates; depopulated; depopulating
1. To remove or to reduce the population of by destruction or expulsion.
2. To cause a country or area to have fewer people living in it.
depopulated (adjective), more depopulated, most depopulated
A reference to the loss of inhabitants as a result of war or disease.
depopulation
The condition of having reduced numbers of inhabitants or resulting in no inhabitants at all.
depopulator
1. Someone who depopulates.
2. A person who destroys or expels the inhabitants of a city, town, or country.
3. A "dispeopler".
Hic est qui multum orat pro populo.
Here is the one who prays much for the people.
Knowledge: People and Their Influences
Influences on humanity from the past and in the present.
Lux veritas peritia populo nostro.
Light, truth, and skill for our people.

Motto of the Coastal Carolina Community College, Jacksonville, North Carolina, USA.

overpopulate
1. To fill with an excessive number of people, straining available resources and facilities.
2. To cause to have too great a population.
overpopulation
An excessive population of an area to the point of overcrowding with a depletion of natural resources, or environmental deterioration.
people
Per lumen scientiae viam invenient populi. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Through the light of knowledge the people will find a way."

Motto of Texas College, Tyler, Texas, USA.

populace
1. People in general considered as a whole.
2. The inhabitants of a town, region, or other area.
3. The general public: ordinary people, as distinct from the political elite or the aristocracy.

Related "people, human" word units: anthropo-; demo-; ethno-; ochlo-; publi-.