neg-, ne-

(Latin: no, not; to refuse, to nullify; to deny)

abnegate (verb), abnegates; abnegated; abnegating
1. To give up or to surrender: The King abnegated his throne to his son.
2. To deny something to oneself; to restrain; especially, from indulging in some pleasure: The minister of the church abnegated the material luxuries of life.

When Agnes Marcia became a nun after the deaths of her son and husband in an auto accident, she was abnegating a life of comfort and ease in order to dedicate her life to God.

Indulging in an ice cream sundae abnegates the healthful effects of having a salad for lunch.

Because Lucy wants to lose weight, she is abnegating eating so much food during her meals.

To deny and to reject.
© ALL rights are reserved.
To renounce or to give up.
© ALL rights are reserved.

Go to this Word A Day Revisited Index
so you can see more of Mickey Bach's cartoons.

abnegation (ab" ni GAY shuhn) (s) (noun), abnegations (pl)
1. The renunciation of a person's own interests in favor of the interests of others: Some religions have days of fasting and so abnegation involves the giving up of all food or anything a person likes to eat in order to follow the rules and requirements of his or her beliefs.

The Vice Principal's abnegation of her position to allow for the promotion of a younger person was admired by all.

The Board of Directors was faced with a couple of uncertainties regarding the abnegations of the entire staff at the shelter for women.

Samuel's sudden abnegation of a wild life to become a Christian missionary was a great surprise for everyone who knew him.

2. The denial and rejection of a doctrine or a belief: There are those who have an abnegation of the existence of God.
3. Etymology: from Latin abnegare, "to refuse, to deny"; from ab-, "off, away from" + negare, "to deny".
Self-denial and renunciation.
© ALL rights are reserved.

Go to this Word A Day Revisited Index
so you can see more of Mickey Bach's cartoons.

abnegator (s) (noun), abnegators (pl)
Someone who gives up or who relinquishes or renounces something: "In order to reduce his weight, Matthew has become an abnegator of sweets and midnight snacks."
bionegativity (s) (noun), bionegativities (pl)
Abnormality of a personality composition in which one or more parts disturb the total functioning of an organism: "In an entirely healthy neurological organism, the various parts are integrated in such a way that they promote the total function of the organism, while in bionegativity, or an abnormal condition, the integration is diminished and one or more parts slow down or interfere with instead of promoting the total function."
denegation (s) (noun), denegations (pl)
A denial, a contradiction, or a refusal to comply with a request or instruction to do something.
deniable (adjective)
denial (s) (noun), denials (pl)
1. A refusal to comply with or to satisfy a request.
2. A refusal to grant the truth of a statement or allegation; a contradiction. 4. A refusal to accept or to believe something; such as, a doctrine or belief.
5. In psychology, an unconscious defense mechanism characterized by refusal to acknowledge painful realities, thoughts, or feelings.
6. The act of disowning or disavowing; repudiation.
7. Abstinence; as in, self-denial.
denialism (s) (noun), denialisms (pl)
1. A term used to describe the position of governments, political parties, business groups, interest groups, or individuals who reject propositions on which a scientific or scholarly consensus exists.
2. Choosing to deny reality as a way to avoid an uncomfortable truth or about skepticism gone wrong.
3. The refusal to accept an empirically verifiable reality.
4. An essentially irrational action that withholds validation of an historical experience or event.

Apparently the term denialism is a neologism created by Michael Specter (a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998) for his book, Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives, published in 2009; Penguin Press; New York; in which Specter reveals that Americans have come to mistrust institutions and especially the institution of science more today than ever before.

denialist (s) (noun), denialists (pl)
1. Someone who denies an assertion in a controversial political debate or relating to denial in a controversial political debate.
2. Anyone who increasingly has come to maintain personal beliefs even in the face of solid scientific evidence.

It refers to people who deny a range of issues from childhood vaccines to genetically modified foods in which a person increasingly has come to maintain personal denials even in the face of solid scientific evidence.

denier (di NIGH uhr) (s) (noun), deniers (pl)
1. Someone who denies or anyone who declares that something is not true.
2. Anyone who refuses to let someone have or to do something.
3. A person who refuses to gratify his or her own needs or desires.
deny (verb), denies; denied; denying
1. To declare that something is not true or is untrue; to contradict.
2. To refuse to let someone have or to do something.
3. To refuse to acknowledge or to recognize someone; to disavow.
4. To decline to grant or to allow; to refuse.
5. Etymology: from Old French denier, from Latin denegare, from de-, "away" + negare, "to refuse, to say 'no' "; from Old Latin nec, "not", from an Italic base nek-, "not".
electronegative (adjective)
1. Charged with negative electricity, which results in the attraction of positively charged bodies and the repulsion of negatively charged bodies.
2. Having the power to attract electrons, and so it is likely to become negatively charged when it is combined with a less electronegative atom or group.
3. Relating to an atom or molecule that tends to draw in electrons from outside the system.

Nonmetals are generally electronegative.

negation (s) (noun), negations (pl)
negationist (s) (noun), negationists (pl)
negative (adjective)