inter-, intero-

(Latin: between; among, mutually, together; on the inside, internal)

Although abstracted from the many compounds in which it entered English, the form inter- was not generally considered a living prefix in English until the 1400s.

During the later period of Middle English many words borrowed in the Old and Middle French forms entre-, enter- began to be consciously respelled with Latin inter-; although vestiges of the older French borrowings are found in entertain and enterprise.

The living prefix inter- is now freely added to almost any element in English to create such formations with the meaning of "between" and "among". The words formed by intra- are closely related to this inter- prefix; in fact, they both apparently came from the same Latin source.

—Based on information from Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology
interceptive (adjective), more interceptive, mostinterceptive
intercession (in" tuhr SESH uhn) (s) (noun), intercessions (pl)
1. The act of intervening; such as, to mediate a dispute: The calm that prevailed at the negotiation table with the union was due to the intercession of the skilled negotiator from the federal government.
2. The action of pleading on someone's behalf: Mary went to the judge involved in the criminal case against her brother, as an act of intercession, hoping to help the judge understand that Mark was innocent of any involvement in the bank robbery because he was forced to be with them by the criminals so they could use him to drive them away in his car.
3. An attempt to settle a dispute: Several political prisoners were released from prison by the intercession of the United Nation's representatives.
4. A prayer to God, a god, or a saint on behalf of another person or situation: The religious leader lead a prayer of intercession for the health and safety of Adam's family.
interchange
interchangeable
interchangeably
interchurch
Occurring between or among or common to different churches or denominations; interdenominational.
intercommunicate (in" tuhr kuh MYOO ni kayt") (verb), intercommunicates; intercommunicated; intercommunicating
To connect, to link, or to enable the transmission of messages between two spaces, individuals, etc.: The doors between the two rooms made it easy for the children and their parents to intercommunicate with each other.

The sisters, Patricia and Julia, often intercommunicate with each other by phone and e-mail.

intercommunication (s) (noun), intercommunications (pl)
The fact of being linked in such a manner as to allow for the transmissions of messages: "The intercommunication that existed between the office staff and the administration area allowed for efficient dialogs about office policies."
intercommunion (s) (noun), intercommunions (pl)
1. A relationship or association among two individuals or groups: "The intercommunion of the university students was promoted by many social activities."
2. The practice among some religious organizations of giving or receiving blessed wine and bread: "The minister conducted the intercommunion for the church members who attended the Sunday service."
intercommunity (s) (noun), intercommunities (pl)
A situation whereby there is a joint or collective ownership: "There are many aspects of living in a condominium that encompass the precepts of intercommunity; such as, recreation rooms, exercise equipment, swimming pool, and tennis courts."
intercondylar
Between two condyles (rounded articular surfaces at the extremities of bones).
intercondylous
Situated between two condyles.
intercontinental
interconvertible
interconvertibly

Related "together" units: com-; greg-; struct-.

Cross references of word families related directly, or indirectly, to: "internal organs, entrails, inside": ent-; enter-; fistul-; incret-; intra-; splanchn-; viscer-.