ami-, amic-

(Latin: friend, friendly; loveable; goodwill, cordial; peaceful relations)

The words in this "friend" unit are directly related to the "love" or the amo- unit.

amiability (s) (noun), amiabilities (pl)
amiable (adjective), more amiable, most amiable
1. Characteristic of being friendly and agreeable in feeling and disposition; showing good will; good-natured and likable: Although James and Susan had different opinions regarding housekeeping, they had very amiable cooperation when it came to cooking because they loved doing it together.
2. Conveying cordiality and congeniality with each other: There was an amiable gathering of guests to celebrate Bob's 10th birthday.
Cordial and friendly opponents in the boxing match.
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Lovable and friendly old woman.
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amiably (adverb), more amiably, mostamiably
Friendly and agreeable in disposition; good-natured and likeable.
amicability (s) (noun), amicabilities (pl)
amicable (adjective), more amicable, most amicable
1. Characterized by or exhibiting friendliness, good will, and a cordial relationship: The two teenage sisters, who often had arguments with each other, decided to be more amicable with each other in order to avoid having their parents punish them by giving them extra work to do in the house.
2. Relating to behavior between people that is pleasant and friendly, often despite a difficult situation: Jim's manner was perfectly amicable even though he lost the election as the new mayor of his town.
3. Pertaining to an agreement or decision that is achieved without disputes or disagreements: Few people have amicable divorces, but eventually, Joyce and Mark separated in a friendly way.
A reference to being friendly and promoting good will.

Characteristic of being cordial and having a good relationship.
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amicably (adverb), more amicably, most amicably
amicicide (s) (noun), amicicides (pl)
The act of murdering one's friend.
Amicus certus in re incerta cernitur.
A friend in need is a friend indeed.

From Quintus Ennius (239 - 169 B.C.). He served in the Roman army as a centurion during the Second Punic War. Cato brought him to Rome, and he became a Roman citizen in 184. B.C.

He wrote tragedies and comedies adapted from the Greek, satires, epigrams, a didactic poem on nature, a poem on mythology, a poem on Scipio's victory over Hannibal, and the Annals, a history of Rome in eighteen books.

amicus curiae
A friend of the court.

A person appointed by a judge to assist by giving advice in the handling of a legal case.

Amicus optima vitae possessio. (Latin motto)
Translation "A friend is the greatest treasure of life."

Motto of German Emperor Albrecht of Habsburg (1438-1439).

amity (s) (noun), amities (pl)
A state of friendliness, cordiality, and peace among individuals, nations, etc.: After years of feuding, the sons of the two families negotiated an amity; and, as a result, both of their families were much happier.
Peaceful and friendly relations with mutual good will.
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archenemy (s) (noun), archenemies (pl)
A chief enemy or someone's main or worst enemy.
enemy (s) (noun), enemies (pl)
1. Someone who hates or seeks to harm someone or something.
2. A person or group; especially, a military force, that fights against another hostile power in combat or battle.
3. A hostile nation or power.
4. Anyone who feels hatred toward, intends injury to, or opposes the interests of someone else; a foe.
5. Etymology: from Old French enemi, from Latin inimicus, from in-, "not" + amicus, "friend".
enmity (s) (noun), enmities (pl)
A very strong mutual antagonism or hatred: To show enmity towards a person is to harbor bitterness or animosity for him or her.

There is a long history of enmity between certain nations; such as, Israel and Palestine.

The complaints of Jerome about his co-workers earned him the enmity of most of them.

Hostility and hatred expressed about another person or people.
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Mutual antagonism on both sides.
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Bitter attitudes or malice towards each other.
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inimical (in IM ib kuhl) (adjective), more inimical, most inimical
1. Characteristic of something that is likely to be injurious or harmful in effect; adverse: Some people have habits that are inimical to good health; such as, smoking.
2. Unfriendly; hostile: Kate's supervisor sometimes spoke to her in an inimical voice when he was upset by something that she didn't do right.

The TV often creates an inimical environment when Lester tries to do his homework in the same room.

The judge's inimical glare at Mildred, during her testimony in court, indicated that he doubted that she was telling the truth.

Hostile or having the attitude or temper of an enemy.
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