You searched for: “v
ad valorem; ad val., ad v., a/v; ad valorem tax (Latin terms)
Translation: "According to value or per unit of value; that is, divided by the price."

Many states and federal governments tax energy extraction in this manner.

It also refers to taxes: "In proportion to invoiced value of goods." A term used when imposing customs and stamp duty, the duty increasing according to the value of the transaction of goods involved. Pronounced in English as: ad vuh LOH ruhm.

delta V, ΔV (s) (noun); delta Vs, ΔVs (pl)
A mathematical expression for a change in velocity; especially, referring to spacecraft: Delta V designates the speed changes required to transfer a spacecraft from one orbit to another one.
This entry is located in the following unit: delta, delt-; Δ, δ (page 2)
V; quinque, quintus
Cardinal: five, Ordinal: fifth
This entry is located in the following unit: Roman Numerals + (page 1)
Vide; v.; vid.
Latin for "See."

An instruction in a printed document to look for a citation that follows.

volt per meter, V/m
The Système International [d'Unités] (International System [of Units]) derived unit of electric field strength; 1 volt/1 meter = 1 newton/1 coulomb.
This entry is located in the following unit: volt + (page 4)
volt, V
1. A unit of measurement of force, or pressure, in an electrical circuit.

The common voltage of an AC power line is 120 volts of alternating current (alternating directions) while common voltages within a computer are from 3 to 12 volts of direct current (one direction only).

2. The unit of potential difference or electromotive force in the meter-kilogram-second system, equal to the potential difference between two points for which one coulomb of electricity will do one joule of work in going from one point to the other.

Electric potential is the amount of work needed to move a unit charge from a reference point to a specific point against an electric field. Typically, the reference point is the earth, although any point beyond the influence of the electric field charge can be used.

3. A standard unit of potential difference or electromotive force equivalent to the potential difference between two points requiring one joule of work to move one coulomb of electricity from the point of lower potential to the point of higher potential. 4. A unit of electrical force equal to that amount of electromotive force that will cause a steady current of one ampere to flow through a resistance of one ohm.
5. The standard unit used to measure how strongly an electrical current is sent around an electrical system.
This entry is located in the following unit: volt + (page 4)
voltage-to-frequency converter, V/F converter
1. A device that converts an analogue input voltage into a sequence of digital pulses with a frequency that is proportional to the input voltage.
2. A converter that has an output frequency which is a function of some reference or control signal.

This digital output can be fed into a computer for a process control or for other applications.

This entry is located in the following unit: volt + (page 7)
A unit related to: “v
(lists of "V" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)