You searched for: “te
(Greek: "monster, marvel"; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
Word Entries containing the term: “te
Ave, Imperator, morituri te salutant. (Latin statement)
Translation: "Hail, Caesar, they who are about to die salute you."

"Spoken to Claudius by gladiators prior to entering the arena to fight. This may have been a sarcastic salutation."

"Suetonius tells us in his Lives of the Caesars that Emperor Claudius (A.D. 41-A.D. 54) so enjoyed these spectacles, he ordered that even those who fell accidentally be put to death. He wanted to watch their faces as they died."

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 21) par-, para- (page 1) salu- (page 1)
electromagnetic plane wave, TE wave
A transverse electric wave, transverse electromagnetic wave, or transverse magnetic wave.

A transverse electric wave and a transverse magnetic wave are electromagnetic waves in which the magnetic field vectors are every where perpendicular to the directions of propagation.

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 41)
Esto bonus et pius ne sit leo te magis impavidus.
Be good and pious, let not the lion be more undaunted than thou.
This entry is located in the following units: bon- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 2)
In alio pediculum, in te ricinum non vides.
You see a louse on someone else, but not a tick on yourself.
—Petronius Arbiter

Petronius (c. 27-66 A.D.) was a Roman courtier, satirist writer, and credited with writing the Satyricon (Tales of Satyrs); a long satirical romance in prose and verse of which only parts of the 15th and 16th books, in a fragmentary state, still survive.

—Excerpts from Chambers Biographical Dictionary,
Chambers Harrap Publishers, Ltd.; Edinburg, 1997.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 2)
Morituri te salutamus.
We who are about to die salute you.

See Ave, Imperator (above) for additional information.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group M (page 4) salu- (page 1)
Non tua te moveant, sed publica vota.
Let not your own, but the public wishes move you.
Nosce te ipsum.
Know yourself.

The Latin equivalent of Gnothi seauton, a motto that was inscribed on the temple of Apolllo at Delphi.

This quotation was transmuted in the death-conscious Middle Ages into a frequently cited Memento mori: nosce tuam horam or "Know your hour" which refers to the warning that we should be aware of the hour of our death. This motto was commonly written on clock faces.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group N (page 7) not-, nosc-, nit- (page 2)
Te nosce.
Know yourself.

An older version: "Know thyself."

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group T (page 1)
Ut omnes te cognoscant.
So that all may know you.

Motto of Niagara University, Niagara Falls, New York, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group U (page 2) not-, nosc-, nit- (page 4)
Ut te cognoscant et vitam habeant.
So that they may know you and have life.

Motto of the Sacred Heart School of Theology, Hales Corners, Wisconsin, USA.

Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “te
bete noir, bête noir (noun); betes noirs, bêtes noirs (pl)
1. Someone or something that is particularly disliked or avoided: Rosetta's brother was a bête noir because of his criminal activities.
2. An object of aversion or the dread of one’s existence: Mike considered his job a bete noir because he had to work so hard and received such small wages.
3. Etymology: from French, literally "black beast".
A hatred of someone or something.
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This entry is located in the following unit: English Words in Action, Group B (page 4)
An object of aversion or the dread of a person's existence. (1)