You searched for: “of
Units related to: “of
(Greek: of, or pertaining to "god of war", Ares or Mars, used primarily in astronomy)
(Latin: of, pertaining to, or resembling hair; minute [hairlike] blood vessels that connect the arterioles and the venules)
(Latin: suffix from -ensis, of, belonging to, from [a place]; originating in [a city or country])
(from Proto-Germanic -iskaz, Vulgar Latin -iscus, Italian -esco, and then French -esque: a suffix forming adjuectives and indicating "resemblance, style, manner, or distinctive character, etc., of")
(Latin: wise, wisdom, to be wise, to have wisdom; to know, knowledge; to taste [of], to perceive)
(Latin: of, relating to, or resembling; compound of the suffixes -ule, "little, small" and -ar, "pertaining to, of the nature of, like"; and so, -ular is a combining form meaning: referring to something "specified": appendicular, molecular, pedicular; as well as, a combining form meaning "resembling" something specified: circular, globular, tubular)
(Latin: of, or pertaining to, a cow; a bovine)
(owls come in several shapes and sizes)
(Greek: prefix; no, absence of, without, lack of; not)
(confusion exists about usage of "a" and "an" in front of other words)
(Latin: prefix; indicating electromagnetic units of the centimeter-gram-second system)
(Latin: belly, venter [the use of "stomach" is considered incorrect for this root word]; from Latin abdo-, to put away)
(Latin: a suffix; expressing capacity, fitness to do that which can be handled or managed, suitable skills to accomplish something; capable of being done, something which can be finished, etc.)
(Greek: irresolution, indecision, loss or defect of the ability to make decisions)
(history of how, when, and why hundreds of words have entered the English language)
(Greek > Latin: suffix; from French -aque, or directly from Latin -acus, from Greek -akos forming adjectives. This suffix was used to form names of arts and sciences in Greek and it is now generally used to form new names of sciences in English; meanings, "related to, of the nature of, pertaining to, referring to")
(Greek > Latin: [originally, Academus/Akademus, a name of a hero in Greek mythology; then it became a gymnasium near Athens where Plato taught])
(Latin: bird of prey, a hawk; hawk-like)
(Latin: a suffix; having the quality of, of the nature of, characterized by, belonging to, resembling)
(Greek > Latin: tendon at the back of the heel)
(Latin: a sharp edge or point; mental acuity, sharpness of vision)
(Latin: a kind of short sword or scimiter)
(Latin: suffix; quality of)
(the study and applications of sound)
(Greek: high, highest, highest point; top, tip end, outermost; extreme; extremity of the body)
(Greek: ray [as of light] or like a ray in form; radiance, radiation; a radiating or tentacled structure)
(Latin: suffix; state, quality, condition, or act of; forming nouns)
(the state of being enslaved to a habit or practice or to something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming, as narcotics, to such an extent that its cessation causes severe trauma)
(Latin: suffix; forming nouns and verbs; an action done; the product of or a result of some kind of material or a process of doing something)
(Latin: fat, fatty; lard; of or pertaining to fat; fleshy)
(there are over 64,000 word-entry sections, or word topics, which advertisers may choose to "buy" at a reasonable price with links to their sites of choice)
(Latin: age; space of time, ever, always; eternity)
(Greek > Latin: love feast of the early Christians; love, love feast; to love)
(Latin: suffix; quality of, act of, process, function, condition, or place; forms nouns that denote an action; a product of an action; a place, an abode)
(Greek > Latin: from ager to agri and agrarius, of the land; land, fields)
(Latin: suffix; pertaining to, like, of the kind of, relating to, characterized by, belonging to; action of, process of)
(Greek > Latin: depending on chance or luck; pertaining to gambling; rolling of dice; game of hazard or chance)
(Greek: one another, of one another; literally, "the other"; reciprocally; in mutual relation)
(Greek: different, of or belonging to another; foreign, strange; abnormal; perverse)
(Greek: ; beginning, first of anything; first letter of the Greek alphabet; used in physics and chemistry to designate a variety of series or values)
(Greek: food of the gods that gave immortality; immortal, divine, excellent)
(Latin: stream of water, river)
(Greek: around, about, both, on both sides of, both kinds)
(the importance of Latin and Greek in the development of English as revealed in the history of English)
(two separate units where one is dealing with phobias and the other one presents manias)
(index of links to a vast number of words with illustrations)
(Latin: often through French, quality or state of; being; condition; act or fact of _______ ing; a suffix that forms nouns)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(Latin: an old woman; old age of a woman; a "venerable woman")
(this is a pictionary of lions from African countries)
(shrewd configurations of the elephant shrew)
(a different kind of vocabulary lexicon that emphasizes English words primarily from Latin and Greek origins)
(Latin: before, in front of, prior to, forward; used as a prefix)
(Latin: before, in front of; fore, prior, preceding; used as a prefix)
(Greek: man, mankind; human beings; including, males (man, men; boy, boys) and females (woman, women; girl, girls); all members of the human race; people, humanity)
(Greek: cave, cavern; in medicine, of or pertaining to a [bodily] cavity or sinus; a term in anatomical nomenclature, especially to designate a cavity or chamber within a bone)
(Latin: ring, an iron ring for the feet; circle; (so called because of its form); usually the posterior opening of the alimentary canal through which undigested food is voided; the anus)
(Greek: lower extremity of the windpipe; by extension, extremity of the heart, the great artery)
(the Sun god who brings life-giving heat and light to Earth)
(Latin: a suffix; pertaining to, of the nature of, like; denoting an agent)
(Greek: of the bear, bear [the animal]; or the north, northern)
(a suffix which forms nouns that refer to people who regularly engage in some activity, or who are characterized in a certain way, as indicated by the stem or root of the word; originally, which appeared in Middle English in words from Old French where it expressed an intensive degree or with a pejorative or disparaging application)
(Latin: harena; sand, sandy place, sea-shore; place of combat [literally, "place strewn with sand"])
(Latin: harena, "sand" or "arena" in English, became the general term for "shows" and now it refers more to "sports", etc.)
(Latin: harena, "sand" or "arena" in English, became the general term for "shows" and now it refers more to "sports", etc.)
(Latin: a suffix forming adjectives from nouns ending in -ary; a person who, a thing that; a person who is a part of something, pertaining to one's state or condition; a person who has a connection with or belief in the stated subject; a promotor of something; a native or inhabitant of someplace; someone of a certain age)
(Latin: awn or beard of grain; ear of grain)
(Latin: weapon; implement of war)
(Greek > Latin: yellow orpiment [pigment of gold]; arsenic trisulfide, having a lemon-yellow color and a resinous luster; used as a pigment)
(Latin: a suffix; a person who, a place where, a thing which, or pertaining to; connected with; having the character of; apparatus)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; used in medicine to denote a state or condition of)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; one who; forms nouns from verbs in -ize; nouns denoting the adherent of a certain doctrine, principle, or custom)
(Greek: anklebone, talus ball of ankle joint; dice, die [the Greeks made these from ankle bones])
(the science of the stars, anciently equivalent to astronomy, which was known as natural astrology, and used to predict such natural events as eclipses, the date of Easter, and meteorological phenomena)
(understanding astronomical phenomena in terms of the laws of physics)
(Latin: grandfather; ancestor; father of a great-grandfather)
(Latin: a suffix; office of, office holder)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; pertaining to; of the nature of)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; action, act, process, state, or condition; or result of doing something)
(Greek > Latin: one of the Titans, son of Iapetus and Clymene, supporting the heavens on his shoulders; later, a king of Mauretania, changed by Perseus into Mt. Atlas [Greek mythology])
(essential physics of the emission of attosecond light pulse)
(Latin: hearing, listening, perception of sounds)
(Latin: diviner, soothsayer; a member of the college of priests in Rome, who foretold the future; in ancient Rome, a priest who foretold events by interpreting omens)
(Latin: to look, to observe in order to make a prediction; to see omens; from auspex [genitive form auspicis] avi-, stem of avis, "bird" plus -spex, "observer", from specere)
(Greek: indicates the presence of nitrogen in chemistry)
(Greek > Latin: an ancient Greek and Roman god of wine and revelry; earlier called Dionysus by the Greeks)
(Greek balaustion > Latin balaustium: supporting post of a railing on a balcony, staircase, etc. Borrowed from Italian balaustro, from balaustra; so called because of the resemblance of a baluster to the double-curving calyx tube of the "wild pomegranate flower".)
(a short history about the profession of barbers)
(the bearded races of mankind have commonly held the beard in high honor)
(scientist, inventor, printer, writer, patriot, and diplomat; sharing his contribution of wisdom to generations from the past, in the present, and into the future)
(Greek: deep, depth; the fauna and flora of the bottom of the sea; sea bottom; depth [by extension, this element includes lake, river, and stream bottoms])
(fauna [animals] and flora [plants] at the bottom of the sea)
(Greek: B, β; second letter of the Greek alphabet and the second object in any order of arrangement or classification)
(scribe tools and symbols of one of the most important occupations of ancient Egyptian times)
(acknowledgements of information utilized for -cola, -colas; -cole; -colent; -colid; -coline; -colous word entries)
(references used in the contents of Word Info)
(Latin: bile; which is a digestive juice secreted by the liver, stored in the gallbladder, and aids in the digestion of fats)
(controlling access has its advantages)
(units which explain the various aspects of biometrics)
(applications of biometrics; problems and "smart passports")
(definitions of terms used in biometric technology)
(robotics engineers blend expertise from fields of biology and computer engineering to produce robots that mimic living creatures)
(the production of natural-life mimics)
(an example of a natural mimic of cockleburr seed casings)
(Greek: germ, bud; shoot, formative cell or layer; of or pertaining to an embryonic or germinal stage of development)
(Latin: a suffix; result of the act of, means of, place for)
(Greek: mucus; a slippery protective secretion that is produced in the linings of some organs of the body by the mucous membranes and glands)
(Greek: look, see; sight, seeing, vision; a condition of sight or vision)
(Greek: eyelid; of or pertaining to the eyelid[s] or eyelash[es])
(A Blog is Another Way to Express Our Selves When Writing on the Internet)
(A Blog is Another Way to Express Our Selves When Writing on the Internet)
(more and better sterilization of body parts is essential to successful body transplants)
(books from everywhere and any time)
(of uncertain origin: to spoil; to bungle, to cause something to fail through carelessness or incompetence)
(Greek: cluster, cluster of grapes, clusterlike, grapes)
(Greek: slow, slowness; delayed, tardy; a prefix used in the sense of being "abnormally slow")
(Greek: windpipe or one of the two large branches of the trachea, the tube in air-breathing vertebrates that conducts air from the throat to the bronchi, strengthened by incomplete rings of cartilage)
(Latin: cheek; the inner or outer sides of the mouth and the face)
(Greek > Latin: onion, bulbous root, bulb; ball-shaped part of the stem of certain plants; such as, onions, tulips etc, from which their roots grow)
(Latin: burere, "to burn up"; from urere, with an inserted or faulty separation of b in amburere, "to burn around"; which stands for amb-urere, "to burn around", but it was misdivided into am-burere and because of this misdivision, the new verb burere was formed with the past participle bustum; so, it really came from urere, "to burn, to singe")
(Greek: bad, harsh, wrong, evil; incorrect; unpleasant; poor; used most of the time as a prefix)
(Latin: the wand of a herald, herald's staff; specifically, the wand of Hermes [Greek] and Mercury [Latin])
(Latin: lime, calcium; heel, bone of the tarsus; to tread; derived from calx, calcis, "limestone, lime, pebble"; from Greek words halix and psephos, "small stone, pebble".)
(a compilation of several languages)
(books that have served as sources of information for the compilations of the various calendar histories and modern usages of several chronological topics)
(The Nordic story of Tiw and Fenris)
(Decembris, once was the tenth month of the old Roman calendar)
(Februarius, a month of purification)
(May, the month of fertility)
(March, named for the Roman god of War)
(links to a variety of languages)
(waxing, waning and phases of the moon)
(the sidereal and the synodical month)
(importance of the moon)
(significant historical eclipses of the moon)
(impacts of lunar eclipses)
(an important symbol for many people)
(aspects of the moon are known as phases from a Greek word meaning "appearance")
(November is the 11th month of the New Style Calendar)
(October, now the tenth month of the Roman calendar)
(Development of the Roman Calendar Through the Centuries)
(meaning and origin)
(French: degree of merit or importance; diameter of a bullet, cannon-ball, etc.; instrument for measuring the thickness, width, or distance through the center of a tube)
(Greek: shell; husk; cup [of a flower], used primarily in the specialized senses of "pertaining to or of a cup-shaped bodily organ or cavity"; also a reference to the "cup-shaped ring of sepals encasing a flower bud")
(Latin: flat space, plain; of or pertaining to fields)
(Greek > Latin: reed, pipe; the word for "reed" in Hebrew, Arabic, and Egyptian was kaneh; then the word element passed into Greek and Latin, and into the languages of western Europe)
(Greek: hemp; of or pertaining to hemp's chemical components or derivatives.)
(Greek > Latin: corner of the eye)
(Latin: catch, seize, take, take hold of, receive, contain, hold; caught, taken prisoner)
(Part 1 of 4: The Ballad of Salvation Bill by Robert W. Service and additional capnomania-fumimania information about smoking or addiction to tobacco smoke from the past to the present)
(Part 2 of 4: "The Ballad of Salvation Bill" by Robert Service was based on experiences he had with a compulsive smoker who just had to smoke because smoking was so important in his life)
(Part 3 of 4: smoking and anti-smoking, or anti-tobacco, have been in conflict for more than a century regarding those who smoke)
(Part 4 of 4: more historical incidents about smoking and what happens to people who smoke)
(Part 1 of 4: fear and hatred of tobacco smoke or being around smokers and being exposed to smoking in general)
(Part 2 of 4: fear and hatred of tobacco smoke and the efforts to restrict smoking in public places)
(Part 3 of 4: fear and hatred of tobacco smoke and the efforts being made to restrict smoking where those who don't smoke are not adversely affected by those who are smokers)
(Part 4 of 4: smoking in public and the efforts to ban, or to restrict, second-hand smoke that threatens the lives of waiters, waitresses, and innocent customers so they don't have to suffer from the discomfort and health perils presented by smokers)
(out of the laboratory and producing real applications)
(Latin: hinge, hinge of a door, pivot, that on which something turns; thus, principal, chief)
(Greek: karos, deep sleep, drowsiness; the great arteries of the neck)
(Greek > Latin: map; card [playing]; a piece of papyrus, paper)
(Latin: to cut, geld, spay; to remove the testicles or ovaries of an animal, including humans)
(This suffix has no etymological source; it is just a part of other words.)
(Greek: fire, burn, burnt, burner; from kaustikos, "capable of burning" or "burning" and kaukstos, "combustible" and from kaiein, "to burn")
(Latin: blind, blind gut [first part of the large intestine, forming a dilated pouch into which open the ileum, the colon, and the appendix vermiformis]; any blind pouch)
(Latin: a storeroom, a chamber, a closet; by extension, of or pertaining to a cell, a microscopic protoplasmic mass made up of a nucleus enclosed in a semipermeable membrane)
(cytology is the study of cells and the cell theory states that all living things are composed of cells and that all cells arise only from other cells)
(Latin: a small cell, consisting of cells; a small storeroom)
(Greek: hollow; abdomen; hernia; used primarily in the sense of concave; pertaining to a bodily cavity)
(Latin: brain; that part of the brain that is concerned with the coordination of body movements)
(Latin: to separate, to sift, to distinguish, to understand, to decide, to determine; separated, separation, to set apart; the glandular extraction or the movement out of a natural substance)
(Greek: [from keros, beeswax, wax] formed of wax)
(Latin: character; Greek: kharakter; originally, "a distinctive mark, a sign, or impression"; then it came to mean "an aggregate of distinctive qualities")
(Modern Latin: chemical element; a form of America; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; first made at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at the University of California in Berkeley; radioactive metal)
(Greek: bromos, a stench; because of the odor [stench] from its vapors; liquid nonmetal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; first made at the University of California and named for California and the University of California in Berkeley; radioactive metal)
(Greek: chloros, grass-green; a reference to the color of the gas which tends to be greenish-yellow; gas)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, chroma, color; because many of its compounds are colored; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Latin, cuprum, referring to the island of Cyprus; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; named in honor of Enrico Fermi, an Italian-American physicist; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; Gallia, the Latin name for the area that became France after the fall of the Roman Empire; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Hafnia, the Latinized name of Copenhagen; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from a Latin word Hassias meaning “Hess”, the German state of Hessen; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; Holmia, the Latinized form of Stockholm; rare earth)
(Greek: iodes, "violet"; from the color of its vapor; nonmetal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, iris, a "rainbow", because of the changing color of its salts; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; named for Ernest Lawrence, an American physicist and inventor of the cyclotron; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Gaulish-Latin, Lutetia, a fortified town of a Gaulish tribe of the Parisii, the ancient name of Paris; rare earth)
(Latin: magnes, "magnet"; because of confusion with magnetic iron ores; or magnesia nigri, meaning "black magnesia"; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; named in honor of Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeléyev, a Russian chemist who contributed so much to the development of the periodic table; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: named for the goddess, Niobe, daughter of Tantalus. This element is also known as columbium; metal)
(Latin: "forming niter", or “niter producer”; because niter, a mineral properly called potassium nitrate, and contains nitrogen, a compound of nitrogen; gas)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; named in honor of Alfred Nobel; the discovery was made at the Nobel Institute; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, named in honor of the asteroid Pallas, which was discovered at about the same time; and for Pallas, the Greek goddess of wisdom; metal)
(Greek: phosphoros, "light bringer", "morning star"; glows brightly because of rapid oxidation; nonmetal)
(Modern Latin: a diminutive of the Spanish plata, "silver", "platina"; metal)
(Modern Latin: named for potash, a compound of potassium; the symbol is from Latin kalium; from Arabic, gilf, and a reference to the charred ashes of the saltwort; metal)
(Greek: prasios, "green", plus didymos, "twin" [with the element neodymium] because of a green line in its spectrum; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: from Latin radius, meaning “ray”, because of its intense radioactivity; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: from Latin Rhenus, in honor of the Rhine River in Germany; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, rhodon, "rose"; in reference to the red color of its salts; metal)
(Modern Latin: English, soda, compound of sodium; the symbol comes from Latin natrium; "a salt"; metal)
(Modern Latin: named for the mythical king Tantalus [who in the Greek myths was tortured by being placed in water up to his chin, which he was never able to drink, whence the word “tantalize”]; because of the element’s insolubility or “to illustrate the tantalizing work he had until he succeeded in isolating this element”; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, thallos, "a young, or green, twig or shoot" [based on the color of its spectrum]; metal)
(Modern Latin: named for Thor, the Norse god of thunder; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, Thule, the Greek name for land north of Britain or for Scandinavia; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: from the Titans of classical mythology; metal)
(Modern Latin: a temporary IUPAC [International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry] nomenclature; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: a temporary IUPAC [International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry] nomenclature; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: a temporary IUPAC [International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry] nomenclature; radioactive metal)
(History of the Chemical Elements Table)
(History of the Chemical Elements Table)
(Arabic > Greek > Latin: the art of combining base metals [to make gold]; from Greek, chemia, “Egypt”, supposedly where the art of changing metals into gold existed)
(Greek: twenty-second letter of the Greek alphabet; Χ, χ)
(perceptions of China and the Chinese in their actual interrelationships with themselves and the rest of the world; as well as, the potential hazards and perils of their global dominance)
(Greek: Cheiron > Latin, Chiron; a centaur famous for his knowledge of plants)
(Greek: tunic, covering; a reference to the chemical constituent of crab and lobster shells)
(Greek: choledochos, from chole, "bile" + dechomai, "to receive"; the common bile duct or tube; conveying bile; containing bile, which is a yellow-green fluid that is made by the liver, stored in the gallbladder, and passes through the common bile duct into the first section of the small intestine or duodenum where it helps to digest fat)
(Greek: khorde, "gut string" [of a lyre]; used in an extended sense to mean "sinew, flexible rod-shaped organ, string, cord"; Latin: chorda, "related notes in music, string of a musical instrument, cat-gut" via Old French, corde, "rope, string, twist, cord")
(Greek: dance; involuntary movements; spasm; in medicine, it is used to reveal a nervous disorder either of organic origin or from an infection)
(Greek: acquisition of wealth by making money; transacting business to gain wealth; efforts made to possess goods and money; striving to be rich)
(narrative descriptions and records of events from the distant and recent past; as well as, significant current events of global interest)
(Greek: time, times; sequence of times)
(Greek: earth, of the earth, soil, dirt)
(Greek (khylos) > Latin (chylus): juice, to pour; pertaining to chyle, the milky fluid consisting of lymph and emulsified fat that is a product of the digestive process)
(Greek: juice, liquid; the semifluid material resulting from the partial digestion of food)
(Latin: the eyelid or its outer edge; hairs growing on the edges of the eyelids, eyelashes)
(Greek: uvula; the small piece of soft tissue that can be seen dangling down from the soft palate over the back of the tongue)
(Greek kirrhos: orange-yellow > New Latin cirrhosis: diseased condition of the liver)
(Latin: curl, ringlet; tuft of hair, fringe; by extension, filament, tendril)
(Latin: talk, speak, say; to put into quick motion, to excite, to provoke, to call urgently; to summon, to summon forth, to arouse, to stimulate; used in the sense of "stimulating")
(Latin > French: the ability to see things that are out of normal sight but which can be perceived by extrasensory powers)
(primarily the learning of the Latin and/or Greek languages, history, and literature)
(Greek > Latin: bars, lattice, grate; used in the sense of "lattice[d], latticelike")
(Latin: key; to enclose, to comprise, to involve; to fit together, or to work together; pertaining to the collarbone [so named because of its keylike shape])
(Latin: result of the act of, means of)
(Greek: key; a means of locking or a thing that locks [or unlocks] a door; a key, bar, or hook; a combining form that denotes the clavicle or collarbone)
(art cleptomaniac said, "I enjoy art, I love such works of art, I collected them and kept them at home")
(Greek: inclination, slope; the [supposed] slope of the earth from the equator towards the poles; hence, the latitudinal zone of the earth and prevailing weather in a given zone)
(Greek: bed; slope, slant; to lean, leaning; an ecological term; in the sense of a slope or gradient)
(Greek: the part of the leg between the knee and the ankle)
(Greek: cuckoo; the end of the vertebral column in man and in some apes; the rudiment of a tail)
(Latin: a code of laws, a writing tablet; an account book; secret writing; originally, "the trunk of a tree")
(Greek: glue; used in the sense of "pertaining to a colloid, a gelatinous [gluelike] substance in which particle matter is suspended")
(completed units of words that contain word entries that have both enhanced definitions and appropriate usages in context sentences while units of compositions presents additional information about specific words or topics)
(Greek > Latin: shell, sea shells; shell-like bone or cavity of the body)
(Latin: assembly; group of people, meeting)
(Dictionaries are often more confusing than they are at clearly defining the meanings of words.)
(lists of "A" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "B" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "C" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "D" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "E" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "F" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "G" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "H" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "I" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "J" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "K" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "L" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "M" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "N" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "O" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "P" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "Q" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "R" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "S" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "T" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "U" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "V" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "W" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "X" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "Y" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(lists of "Z" sections that are organized into what for some people are confusing groups of words)
(A list of words with the same spellings that can cause confusion.)
(lists of homonyms, homophones, homographs, and other words that cause confusions)
(Illustrations with special Word Info copyright notice)
(Greek: crowlike; used in the specialized sense of "pertaining to, or connected to the coracoid, the bony process that forms part of the scapular arch [and is so named because its shape resembles that of a crow's beak"])
(Greek: pupil of the eye; kore, literally, "girl" to mean both "doll" and "pupil of the eye")
(Greek > Latin: trunk of a tree or body)
(Latin: horny, hornlike; horny [tissue] pertaining to the cornea, the horny transparent anterior portion of the external covering of the eyes)
(Latin: bark, rind; literally, that which is "stripped off"; used in its extended senses, chief among these being "pertaining to the outer layer of a bodily organ, especially the brain")
(named for French chemist Charles-Augustin de Coulomb (1736-1806), who devised a method of measuring electrical quantity)
(Latin: sickness caused by overindulgence of alcohol, food, etc.; drunkeness)
(Latin: tomorrow, of tomorrow, belonging to tomorrow; delay, delaying, putting off until a later date)
(The U.S. is in danger of losing its status as the world's greatest talent magnet)
(getting a "fire in the head" in order to get the flame of creativity in motion)
(Greek: ring; used in the extended sense of pertaining to the [ring-shaped] cartilage that forms the back and lower part of the laryngeal cavity)
(Latin: judicial decision, verdict; object of reproach, judgement; legal offense, fault, accusation)
(Latin: a suffix; result of the act of, means of)
(Greek: cold, very cold, freezing; used to describe the effects of low temperatures or activities carried on at a very low temperature)
(Industrial applications of cryogenics)
(Industrial applications of cryogenics)
(Latin: a suffix; small, tiny; also, result of the act of, means of)
(Latin: care, heal, cure; care for, give attention to, to take care of)
(Greek: cup, a goblet, a cup for measuring, or drawing wine out of a bowl)
(Greek > Latin: roller, roller-shaped figure; used in the sense of being "roller-shaped, column-shaped")
(Greek: cells, cell, hollow; used primarily in the extended sense of "animal or plant cells" [because cells were originally thought to be hollow])
(examination of fingerprints for identification purposes)
(Latin: to harm, damage, loss; sentence to punishment, doom; worthy of condemnation)
(Latin: from, away from, off; down; wholly, entirely, utterly, complete; reverse the action of, undo; the negation or reversal of the notion expressed in the primary or root word)
(Latin: "ten" plus "bel" [Alexander Graham Bell]; a list of decibel levels and the examples that show the various decibel scales)
(Just two of many lexicons that need to clarify all of the word contents for a better understanding instead of using another form of one of the words that is being defined to explain the other entries or simply not providing any information about the other words besides the primary entry.)
(Greek: triangular; fourth letter; Δ, δ, of the Greek alphabet)
(Latin: write down, perceive, catch sight of; to see, to look for)
(enjoying words with special points of view, sometimes humorous, and which are not found in a "regular" dictionary)
(Latin: worthy of respect and esteem; a positive regard and honor for)
(Greek > Latin: disk; round plate thrown in athletic competitions; used primarily in the extended sense of "something shaped like a round plate")
(blogs, or logs, of Word-Info site activities, daily and nightly)
(blogs, or logs, of Word-Info site activities, daily and nightly)
(blogs, or logs, of Word-Info site activities, daily and nightly)
(the journal saga of Word Info continues)
(another addition to the Word Info site of related articles)
(a limited amount of information to report for today's log)
(Greek > Latin: house, home; master or lord of the house)
(Greek > Latin: dragon; a kind of serpent; snake; a kind of fish; by extension, a festering sore)
(Animal health and dung beetle health: they are both vital)
(without dung beetles, the earth would be one big sphere of dung)
(Latin: first part of the small intestine; based on duodecim, "twelve", because its length is approximately twelve finger-breadths)
(Greek: bad, harsh, wrong; ill; hard to do, difficult at; slow of; disordered; impaired, defective)
(Gaia, Earth goddess of the ancient Greeks, she was called Gaea, Terra Mater, "Earth Mother" by the Romans; third planet from the sun)
(a general presentation of earthquake history)
(Special kinds of "flesh-eating" or insect-eating plants)
(The special features of folivorous existence)
(feeding on a mixed diet of plant and animal ingredients)
(Greek: dilatation, dilation, expansion, extension, or distension of an organ)
(Greek: a suffix; cut, excise, surgical removal of)
(Greek: abortion, untimely birth; primarily used to mean "congenital absence" or "defect" of a part which is normally present)
(Latin: to build, to erect a building; a building, a sanctuary, a temple; originally, aedes, "building a hearth" or "to build a hearth" because the fire in the hearth was the center of the home in early times since it supplied both heat and light; over time, the meaning expanded from the hearth itself to the home and building that enclosed it)
(various topics having to do with technological education and research changes that are going on)
(a crisis which involves the steady erosion of America's scientific and engineering base has been going on for several years)
(Greek > Latin: electric, electricity; from amber, resembling amber, generated from amber which when rubbed vigorously [as by friction], produced the effect of static electricity)
(emerging areas of technology that still might have a profound impact on how we conduct our lives)
(tech areas that will have a profound impact on how we conduct our lives)
(Microfluidic Optical Fibers)
(Greek: a suffix; blood, usually a diseased condition of the blood)
(Latin: a suffix that forms nouns; action, process, state, quality, or condition of)
(Greek > Latin: layer of simple cells lining the inner surface of the circulatory organs)
(Indo-European is believed to be the origin of many modern languages)
(The Warrior Queen of the Iceni, Boudicca, Bodicea, or Boadicea, meaning "Victory", defied and attacked the Romans with her Iceni warriors, and was the embodiment of a people's hatred of Roman mistreatment)
(the revitalization of Christianity into the English culture did much to re-establish a significant number of Latin vocabulary into the English language)
(The story of Beowulf was a literary work in Old English)
(Vikings destroyed and plundered much of England)
(Alfred the Great, the first king of England)
(period of greatest Danish influence)
(period of great literary producion)
(the uniformity of American English is largely a result of the improved modes of travel and communication)
(Cornelius Tacitus, approximately A.D. 55 to A.D. 117, a Roman historian who wrote about the Rebellion of Boudicca, A.D. 60-61)
(references, or bibliography, used as sources of information)
(highlights of illustrated historical events for a better comprehension of the historical periods which contributed to the development of the English language)
(globalization of the English language as presented from various international perspectives)
(an accurate count is impossible)
(Greek: daybreak, dawn, red of the dawn sky; primarily used in naming chemical compounds, especially pertaining to red stain or dye)
(Latin: a suffix; composed of, of the nature of, like)
(Greek > Latin: membrane lining the central canal of the spinal cord and the ventricles of the brain including cells and cellular membranes)
(Greek: denotes the vulva or region of the pubes)
(words which originated from the names of people, things, and places)
(Greek: the fifth letter of the Greek alphabet; Ε, ε)
(a suffix with a variety of applications)
(Latin: process of action)
(a history of anesthesia or anaesthesia)
(the mandragora, or mandrake, plant was used as an anesthesia)
(more history of anesthesia or anaesthesia)
(historical background of anesthesia)
(Latin: pertaining to summer; heat, fire; the ebb and flow of the sea, tide)
(Greek: the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet; Η, η)
(Greek: people, race, tribe, nation; group of people living together; community, family)
(Mark Plotkin, an ethnobotanist takes up the cause of rain forest conservation)
(medicinal plants discovered by traditional societies)
(Greek: upper air, purer air [alcohol and sufuric acid]; in scientific terminology, "volatile, clean-smelling, euphoria-producing liquid composed of alcohol and sufuric acid")
(Greek: -etikos, an adjective suffix meaning "pertaining to, of the nature of" for nouns ending in -esis)
(Greek: truth, true meaning, real [the root meaning, true meaning or literal meaning of a word])
(learning etymologies can multiply your vocabulary easier than by learning lists of words)
(If the origins of words are not known, then much of our language will not be as easily understood nor appreciated!)
(Greek > Latin: literally, guardian of the bed)
(a reaction of delight and excitement when someone makes a discovery)
(Greek: out of, out, outside; away from; used as a prefix)
(Latin: a prefix occurring in words of Latin origin used in the senses: out, out of, from; upward; completely, entirely; to remove from, deprive of; without; former [said of previous holders of office or dignity])
(Greek > Latin > French: bind by oath; calling up or driving out of [evil] spirits)
(Anglo Saxon or Teutonic: in Old English times, eye was eage, which is related to a whole range of words for "eye" in other European languages; including, Greek ophthalmos and Latin oculus [with all of its subsequent derivatives])
(Latin: workshop of an artisan, building, fabric, forger)
(Latin: servant, domestic, part of a household ; members of a group; close relationships)
(Latin: from fanum, "temple"; a temple or a place of worship)
(Latin: to speak; utterance, expression, manifestation; expressed in a number of ways)
(Latin: band, bandage; bundle, bunch; used in the extended sense of "pertaining to the fascia", a band or sheet of fibrous tissue providing a subcutaneous covering for various parts of the body)
(The Greek goddesses of destiny)
(Latin: animal; a collective name for the animals of a certain region or time)
(Latin: a minute fiber or filament; often a component of a compound fiber)
(Latin: excrement, dung; from faeces, plural of faex, "dregs, sediment")
(Latin: yeast; substance containing enzymes that break down carbohydrates; from the Latin root of fervere, "to boil, to seethe")
(Latin: seize, to be seized; capable of being seized)
(Latin: an insoluble protein that is an essential part of blood coagulation)
(Latin: clasp, brooch; outer bone of the leg)
(Latin: fringe or a border or edging, fringed; thin projections forming a fringe (especially around the ovarian end of the Fallopian tube); fiber)
(Latin: pipe; an abnormal passage or communication, usually between two internal organs, or leading from an internal organ to the surface of the body)
(Latin: to fasten; to attach; from fixus, past participle of figere)
(Afghanistan to Azerbaijan)
(Bahamas to Burundi)
(Cambodia to Czech Republic)
(Denmark to French Southern Territories)
(Iceland to Luxembourg)
(Macao City to Mynamar)
(Namibia to Nunavut, Canadian Territory)
(Uganda to Zimbabwe)
(Latin: to blow, a puff of wind or air; by extension, accumulation of gas in the stomach or bowels)
(Unknown origin: act or habit of showing off)
(Latin: tuft or cluster, as of wool)
(Latin: flower; full of flowers, abounding in flowers; flora, plant life, plants of a general region or period)
(the first newsletter of a series that was formerly presented as separate publications)
(a connection of this and fourteen other Focusing on Words Newsletters are available for your learning opportunities by clicking on the link under the banner)
(Latin: forensis of a forum, place of assembly; public, public speaking; foras, foranus, outside, residing outside, out of doors)
(Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is the practice of extracting natural gas from underground shale deposits by injecting high-pressure streams of water, sand, and chemicals)
(Latin: rein, bridle, a bit (as in a horses mouth); by extension, a medical term for a connecting fold of membrane in the body)
(Latin: forehead, brow, the forepart of anything; that which projects)
(Latin: fruit; from Old French fruit, from Latin fructus, "fruit, produce, profit" from frug-, stem of frui, "to use, to enjoy".)
(converting fuel into electricity for power storage)
(Latin: bottom, base; and with special reference to financial applications, "piece of land")
(Latin: mold, mushroom; any of a group of plants including mushrooms, molds, mildews, etc.)
(Latin: helmet, helmet shaped, to cover with a helmet; cap; used primarily in zoology and botany with phases of sense development that seem to have been: weasel, weasel's skin or hide, leather, and then a helmet made of leather; by extension, it also means "cat, cats" in some words)
(Latin: of or pertaining to Gaul)
(Named after the Italian physician and physicist who investigated the nature and effects of what he conceived to be electricity in animal tissue; who in 1762 discovered and first described voltaic electricity; electric currents; and primarily, direct electrical current.)
(Greek: Γ, γ; the third letter of the Greek alphabet; corresponding to g, as in go and as a numeral, it indicates 3)
(Greek > Latin: swelling, a knot; center of a cavity; nerve center; pertaining to a mass of nerve tissue)
(Greek: an eating, or gnawing, sore ending in mortification, necrosis, or the death of bodily tissue; usually the result of ischemia or the loss of blood supply to the affected area, bacterial invasion, and subsequent putrefaction)
(Old French: look at, consider, think of; from guard, to heed)
(Latin: feeling of pleasure and delight; joy, rejoice)
(Greek > Latin: race, kind; line of descent; origin, creation; pertaining to sexual relations, reproduction, or heredity; and more recently, a gene or genes)
(from Late Latin, 1526, genuflectionem (genuflexio), from stem of genuflectere "genuflect", from Latin genu, "knee" + flectere< "to bend")
(Latin: pertaining to the Teutonic people of central Europe [possibly from a Celtic word meaning "neighbor"], similar to Old Irish gair, "neighbor"; pertaining to Germany)
(Latin: the gums of the mouth)
(Greek: glue; in medicine, the network of supporting tissue and fibers that nourishes nerve cells within the brain and spinal cord)
(Latin: a round body, a ball; round, a sphere; the earth; "sphere" came from Latin globus, "round mass, sphere"; related to gleba, "clod, soil, land". Sense of "planet earth," or a three-dimensional map of it, appeared first in 1553)
(GPS Defined and Indications of Improvements in Accuracy)
(lists of articles that have content about GPS)
(international cheating, defrauding, and dishonesty and their detriments to human progress)
(translations of "The Grand Panjandrum" story)
(Greek: buttock, butt, rump; muscles of the buttocks; sometimes, it means "round")
(Greek: sweet; used in the specialized sense of "sweet, syrupy liquid")
(Greek: carve, carving, engraving; to hollow out; by extension, a form of writing)
(a few deities and the symbols that represent them)
(number, search engine, eye actions, protector of the eyes)
(Greek: write, writing, something written, a written record, a recording; letters; words; later, a small weight, a unit of mass in the metric system)
(Hindu: references to a wandering race of people who have called themselves and their language Romany)
(from the depths of the ocean floors to the highest mountains, from dry deserts to grasslands, and the warm and wet tropical areas; all provide each form of life its preferred habitat)
(Samples of ancient beard and male and female hair styles)
(Latin: great or big toe, the first digit of the foot)
(Greek: something that is wrong; sin, evil behavior; wickedness in living; misconduct; that part of theology that deals with sin or immoral deeds)
(an exhibit of artistically enhanced hands showing creative marvels)
(a personal presentation by a pair of hands)
(special selections of presentations dealing with health)
(be aware of the effects of oxytocin in nasal sprays)
(Greek: youth, pubescence, puberty [the period during which the secondary characteristics of maturity begin to develop; by extension, a young man])
(Latin: blunt, dull; lethargy, lack of energy or interest in doing things)
(having feelings of pleasure or happiness are among the highest achievements of life)
(Greek: "blood " plus Latin: "sphere, ball"; oxygen-carrying protein of the red corpuscles)
(Greek: Hermes, the son of Zeus and Maia, the god of commerce and messenger of the gods in Greek mythology; identified by the Romans as Mercury; however, some of the words in this unit come from Hermes tris megistos, Hermes Trismegistus, literally, "Hermes, Thrice the Greatest" referring to the Egyptian god Thoth, who was identified with the Greek god Hermes, of science and arts)
(Latin: protruded viscus; rupture; in the sense of "protrusion of tissue or part of an organ through an abnormal opening in the surrounding walls")
(Latin: winter, wintered, wintry; it also refers to: sleep, sleeping; inactive, inactivity; dormant, dormancy [suspended animation or a lack of activity])
(there are various kinds and conditions of hibernations)
(sacred writing of the Egyptians)
(a father of the early Christian Church whose major work was his translation of the Scriptures from Hebrew and Greek into Latin known as the Vulgate)
(Greek: tissue [web]; beam or warp of a loom; hence, that which is woven; a web or tissue; used in the sense of pertaining to [body] tissue)
(of all of those who were involved with the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, it was James Murray who made the greatest contributions)
(Greek: even, level, smooth; used in the sense of "flat" or "plane")
(Latin: human beings, mankind; literally, "man, men"; however, it now also includes, "woman, women" or all of humanity)
(confusion that sometimes exists because of the spellings and similar sounds of words)
(Greek > Latin: hour, time; period of time, season, any limited time)
(a garden, of a garden, a gardener; enclosed space, enclosure)
(The human body is at the edge of human comprehension with its microcosmic mysteries and its 100 trillion cells!)
(electronic chips are being placed under the skins of people and animals)
(Greek Goddess [Hygeia, Hygea, Hygia, Hygieia], the source of the word hygiene)
(Tricho Sales Corporation treated excess hair growth with a "ray of light")
(Greek > Latin: a suffix that forms nouns; state of, condition of, quality of; act of)
(Latin: suffix form of -an from -ianus, a modifier of the main word to which it is attached: belonging to, coming from, being involved in, or being like something)
(Latin: a suffix that means "able to [be]"; a variation of -ability)
(Latin: a suffix; can be done, worthy of being, able to be, tending to, capacity for)
(Greek: a suffix; pertaining to; of the nature of, like; in chemistry, it denotes a higher valence of the element than is expressed by -ous)
(Latin: from -icalis, a suffix that forms adjectives from nouns; of or having to do with; having the nature of; constituting or being; containing or made up of; made by or caused by; like, characteristic of; art or system of thought; chemical terms)
(Latin: a suffix that forms nouns; meaning, quality of, state of)
(Greek: fluid [distinct from blood] that flows through the veins of the gods; by extension, "watery part of blood or milk," used in the sense of "thin, serous or sanious fluid, especially from a wound or sore")
(Greek: a suffix; meaning, specialist in, practitioner of)
(Greek: image, likeness; form of a person or object; a sacred, holy, or religious representaion)
(Greek: a suffix that forms nouns and is usually used to form names of arts and sciences)
(Latin: a suffix used to form names of zoological groups, classes, and orders)
(Greek: a suffix used to form the names of families in zoology and biology; descended from, related to)
(Greek idein > Latin idea; the result of a mental processes)
(Creativity is achieved by focusing and striving with one's chosen objective regardless of what others say or have done! In essence, it is a conception and the completion of the chosen vision.)
(Greek: peculiar, one's own, personal, private; of or pertaining to one's self, distinct, separate, alone)
(Latin: suffix; ability to, capable of, suitable for; pertaining to, like, belonging to, tending to)
(Greek > Latin: groin, flank, lower part of the body; gut, bowels, abdomen, loins)
(Old English, Middle English: in, into; within; toward; a prefix used in front of English words, not Latin or Greek elements; as in the words, indoors and inland)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix that is used to form hundreds of words that mean: similar to, resembling, like, characterized by, or of the nature of)
(a consolidation of cyber advances)
(Latin: funnel; literally, "the [little] thing into which something is poured"; a funnel-shaped organ of the body)
(Greek: force, strength; seat of strength; muscle, sinew; fibrous vessel in a muscle)
(Latin: oculus used as a reference to "eye" to designate something that looks like or is suggestive of a person's organ of sight including potato "eyes")
(Latin: a bug; literally, "cut into," from insectum, with a notched or divided body; literally, "that which is cut up, segmented" [as the bodies of the first invertebrates to which the term was applied or appeared to be])
(Latin: island; derived from insul[a], "island" [used here in reference to the islands [islets] of Langerhans, irregular structures in the pancreas that produce the protein hormone insulin which is secreted into the blood where it regulates sugar metabolism])
(Three forms of intern)
(it's possible that the contents of a subject on-line can be more powerful than a traditional linear book)
(Greek: 1. Io, daughter of the river god, Inachus. 2. An arrow; poison, rust)
(Greek: ion, "going"; neuter present participle of ienai, "to go"; because an ion moves toward the electrode of an opposite charge)
(Greek: the ninth letter of the Greek alphabet; Ι, ι)
(Greek: iris [relating to the eye]; the rainbow; colored circle, colored portion of the eye [originally, "something bent or curved"])
(Greek > Latin > Old French > French: pretended ignorance; saying the opposite of what a person really means)
(Old English: a suffix meaning, characteristic of, like, tending to; of or relating to, from; somewhat, approximately; or a verb ending)
(Greek, ismos; Latin, ismus: a suffix: belief in, practice of, condition of, process, characteristic behavior or manner, abnormal state, distinctive feature or trait)
(Greek: narrow passage or ridge; narrow passage or strip [especially of bodily tissue] connecting two larger entities)
(Greek: a suffix; one connected with, inhabitant of; also used to show chemicals, minerals, etc.)
(Greek: a suffix; scientific names; names of metallic elements; a part, lining, or enveloping tissue, region; little; representing a diminutive force)
(Latin: a suffix; tending to; of the quality of, inclined to)
(contronyms or words which have definitions that are self-antonyms; that is, which have two meanings that are the opposites of each other)
(Latin: the fasting [intestine], the portion of the small intestine between the duodenum and the ileum [so named because early anatomists typically found this organ to be empty in dissection]; original meaning, "hungry, not partaking of food")
(Latin: joke, joking, jesting, humorous; cheerful and full of good humor)
(listings of logs, or blogs, sharing personal stepping stones and stumbling blocks)
(Hebrew, jobel, literally, "ram"; from the ram's horn with which the year of celebration was proclaimed; from Latin jubilaeus (annus), "year of jubilee".)
(Jupiter, Iuppiter, Juppiter, or Jove, King of the Roman gods; fifth planet from the sun)
(Greek: the tenth letter of the Greek alphabet; Κ, κ)
(Greek: worry, anxiety, care, grief, trouble, to be concerned for; protector, guardian, most worthy of care)
(Greek: containing, or derived from keratin, a highly insoluble scleroprotein that is the main constituent of horny tissues, the nails, and the organic matrix of tooth enamel; derived from Greek kera[s], kerat[os], "horn")
(facts and truthful information to improve the accuracy of our knowledge)
(signs given in the arenas of Rome and now in our modern times)
(information from a global perspective)
(a collection of significant human knowledge)
(Greek: vegetable, of vegetables)
(Latin: concise, abrupt; literally, resembling the style of the Lacedaemonians or Spartans)
(Greek: speech, babbling, chattering; abnormal or disordered forms of speech)
(Greek: the eleventh letter of the Greek alphabet; Λ, λ)
(Latin: thin plate or layer; the neurophysis of a vertebra)
(Greek: the soft part of the body between the ribs and the hip, flank, loin; denotes the flank or loins and the abdominal wall or a part of the abdomen)
(a slip of the tongue, a mistake in uttering a word, an imprudent word inadvertently spoken; as expressed by public personalities in this series of articles)
(Latin: theft, robbery, felony; from latrocinium, service of mercenaries; freebooting, robbery; latro-, a mercenary soldier, or a robber)
(Latin: insect in its grub stage; from Latin larva, "mask" and by extension, "ghost", the idea being that an insect in its grub stage is merely a ghost of its future self and bears no resemblance to its future form)
(Greek > Modern Latin: throat, upper part of the windpipe; the vocal-chord area of the throat; the musculocartilaginous structure below the tongue root and hyoid bone and above the trachea)
(The Importance of Latin in the English Language)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(classical-language maxims, slogans, adages, proverbs, and words of wisdom that can still capture our modern imagination)
(Greek: yolk of an egg; a reference to the ovum)
(Latin: lentil-shaped, lentil; a term later used to refer to "the lentil-shaped lens of the eye")
(Greek: moths, butterflies; a combination of lepido-, "flake" or "scale" and ptero, "wing")
(Greek: thin, small, fine, delicate, mild; from "peeled, husked"; used primarily in the sense of "abnormally thin, narrow, slender, or delicate")
(Old English: -leas, from leas, "free from, devoid of, false, feigned"; suffix meaning "lacking")
(Greek: leukos, white; the primary meaning now is the color "white"; but it also includes the meanings of "light, clear, bright")
(Latin: book; originally, the "inner bark of a tree", whence "the text written on this", "collection of leaves for writing", and finally "book")
(Latin: on the border (of hell); form of limbus, border, edge)
(Latin: on the border (of hell); form of limbus, border, edge)
(automakers need lithium for the next generation of cars running on batteries charged by electricity)
(Latin > French: bluish, livid; of a bluish-leaden color)
(Deep-sea animals have made attempts to light their cold and dark environments by carrying their own lights on their heads and on every other conceivable part of the bodies; including their eyes and tails and the insides of their mouths. The light they shed is living light.)
(Latin: a hall; a vestibule; a lobby; monastic cloister, of Germanic origin)
(Greek > Latin > French: a rounded projection, especially a rounded projecting anatomical part; such as, lobe of the ear, lobe of the liver, lobe of the lung; seed, pod)
(Greek > Latin: the art of speaking and reasoning)
(Latin: play, make sport of, jest; sportive; pastime)
(Diana, or Luna, Roman goddess of the Moon, animals, and hunting)
(Latin: wash, clean; washing of water against the shore; a flood)
(Latin: spot, mark, stain, blot, blemish, mesh; the original meaning of macula seems to have been, "a soiled spot, a spot to be cleaned")
(Greek: Magnesian [stone]; Magnesia having been a mineral-rich region of Thessaly)
(Greek: pertaining to midwifery; obstetric; serving to elicit ideas [said of the Socratic method of teaching])
(Latin: mantellum, cloak, veil; by way of Middle English, from Old English mentel and from Old French mantel; resulting in English words about: mantle, mantel, and manteau)
(Greek: derived from an ancient villiage in Greece, northeast of Athens; as a result of an important Greek victory over the Persians in 490 B.C.)
(Mars [Greek: Ares], Roman god of war; fourth planet from the sun)
(Latin: male, manly, of or relating to men or boys; of the male sex and gender; bold, courageous)
(Greek: breast; the front of the human chest and either of two soft rounded organs on each side of the chest in women and men; however, with women the organs are more prominent and produce milk after childbirth; also, a milk-producing gland in mammals that corresponds to the human breast)
(Greek: breast; used in the specialized sense as "of or pertaining to the breast-shaped mastoid process of the temporal bone)
(Latin: matter, stuff, wood, timber; of or belonging to matter)
(Greek makhana, machana > Latin machina: machine, device, tool; an apparatus for applying mechanical power to do work; mekhanikos > machynen, decide a course of action, contrive, plot contrivance; a machine or the workings of machines)
(combinations of "mechanical" and "electronics")
(Greek > Latin: [mekonion to meconium] of or pertaining to the poppy, poppy-juice; opium)
(Latin: medium is the neuter form of the adjective medius, meaning "middle"; as well as, a neuter noun meaning, "the middle")
(simplified connections of word parts which work together to form practical medical terms that can enhance one's understanding of several fields of medicine)
(Latin: heal, cure, remedy; physician, doctor; practice of medicine, give medicine to)
(Latin: from meditatus; a form of meditare, to muse, to ponder; to think over, to consider; to think, to reflect)
(Greek: melos, limb, body extremity or member; a condition of the limbs or extremities of a body; such as, arms, hands, fingers, legs, feet, toes, etc.)
(Shards of a tyke, San Francisco, California, 1942-43)
(Memories of Experiences while Living and Traveling in Many Parts of the World)
(The Smoking Gun: A Million Little Lies; Exposing James Frey's Fiction Addiction)
(other writers join the bandwagon in revealing fake entries in book)
(a man who dealt with the origins of words and their developments)
(a memoir contained in the Introduction of his book)
(Preface to a Dictionary of the English Language by Samuel Johnson)
(Text of Commencement Address at Stanford University)
(personal experiences and memories of past events)
(Latin: a suffix; result of, means of, act of)
(Greek meniskos > Latin meniscus: a crescent-shaped body, a curved structure, lunar crescent form, semilunar cartilage; diminutive of mene, "moon")
(tearing or injuring the meniscus of the knee and possible therapy)
(Latin: a suffix; result of, means of, act of; place of action)
(messenger of the Roman gods; first planet from the sun)
(Latin: dip, dive, plunge; rise out of a liquid; combine into one)
(precursor of hypnotism, believed by Mesmer to involve animal magnetism)
(Greek: after, behind, beyond; changed in form, altered; higher [used to designate a higher degree of a branch of science])
(Greek: a combining form occurring in the names of chemical compounds in which the methyl group is present; alcohol, wine)
(numerical values of international metric prefixes)
(infectious diseases via the transmission of foul, putrid air)
(Latin: soldier, fight; soldiers of war; war, warfare)
(Greek: hate, hater, hatred; disgust for; revulsion of; contempt for; abhorrence of)
(Greek: memory, to remember; recollection of something or someone; awareness, consciousness of the present and the past)
(Latin: movement, movement of time, instant, moving power, consequence, importance)
(a collection of misheard words and sentences)
(Latin: action, result of an action or condition; a suffix that forms nouns)
(Spanish: diminutive of mosca, "fly" or "little fly" from Latin musca, "fly")
(more examples of mosquitoes skin diving)
(Greek: the twelfth letter of the Greek alphabet; Μ, μ)
(Latin: mucus, mucous, or mucosa; a viscid, slippery, slime secretion of the mucous membranes; related to mucor, "mold, moldiness")
(Latin: much, many; combining form of Latin multus "much, many"; which is related to the Greek mala, "very, very much, exceedingly")
(Latin: service, performing services; duty, receiver of duties; office, function; gift)
(Greek: goddesses of fine arts; including, Calliope, Clio, Erato, Urania, Euterpe, Polyhymnia, Thalia, Melpomene, and Terpsichore)
(Greek: mousike [techne] > Latin: musica, music; originally an art of the Muses)
(Greek: mucus; a protective secretion from the mucous membranes in the nose, throat, and lungs; a thick fluid produced by the linings of some tissues of the body and is secreted as a protective lubricant coating by cells and glands of the mucous membranes)
(Greek: bone marrow; the spinal cord and medulla oblongata; the myelin sheath of nerve fibers)
(Greek: uncleanness of body or mind; filth; defilement; anything disgusting)
(names that describe Venery or group names as determined by traditional terms of the hunt and those of more modern creations that attempt to describe group characteristics)
(experts say that nanotechnology will change our way of living!)
(a series of nanotech subjects)
(One of the body's busiest passage ways and essential to a person's well being)
(Greek > Latin: drink of the gods; from Greek mythology)
(Neptune, Roman god of the sea; eighth planet from the sun)
(Latin: neither of two; neither one nor the other)
(Focusing on Words Newsletters previously published)
(Latin: Probably from mitulus "mussel", of unknown origin [the change from m to n has not been explained]. It is also said to possibly come from Latin nidificare or nidulari, "to nest"; from nidus "nest", but there is no confirmation for either theory)
(Greek: goddess of victory in Greek mythology; literally, victory)
(An American Dictionary of the English Language as conceived by Noah Webster)
(Greek: a meadow; a pasture; an abode; a place for eating; by extension, "distribution of an acute, necrotizing ulcerative process involving mucous membranes of the mouth or genitalia")
(Greek: law, order, arrangement, systematized knowledge of [something]; usage)
(a group of viruses which are a common cause of gastroenteritis, or "stomach flu")
(Greek: hospital, infirmary; place for the treatment of diseases)
(diseases spread as mankind congregated into a squalor of cities)
(Greek: the thirteenth letter of the Greek alphabet; Ν, ν)
(Latin: from the stem of nubere, "to marry, to wed")
(Medical Latin: neck; of the neck; nape of the neck)
(Latin: nut, kernel of a nut; stone of a fruit; central part of a cell)
(Latin: nod of the head; divine power, divine will, divine command, divinity, god)
(Greek: young bride; woman of marriageable age)
(Latin: to wear out, to grow old; to fall into disuse; to grow out of use; elderly, older)
(A noisy silence in the waters of the oceans and the seas)
(Latin: "little eye", a diminutive of oculus, "eye"; spotted, dotted; as if with tiny eyes)
(an explanation of what it is and where it came from)
(Greek: a strong desire, orgasm; the sting of a gadfly, anything that drives one mad)
(Latin: a suffix; full of, disposed to)
(Latin: to smell; pertaining to the sense of smell; scent; to cause to smell at)
(Greek: a suffix meaning: to talk, to speak; a branch of knowledge; any science or academic field that ends in -ology which is a variant of -logy; a person who speaks in a certain manner; someone who deals with certain topics or subjects)
(Olympia, a place in Greece in the western Peloponnese, scene of the Olympic games)
(Greek: rain, rainstorm; showers of rain; aqueous vapor in the atmosphere; precipitation or falling down from the sky of a form of water; such as, rain, snow, hail, sleet, or mist)
(Greek: the 24th and last letter of the Greek alphabet; Ω, ω; the ending, the last of anything)
(Greek: the fifteenth letter of the Greek alphabet)
(Greek: said to be a stem for "all, every, whole", or "complete"; that is, a field of study in biology that refers to the whole set of omics including their -omics and -ome subfields in order to understand life as a holistic existence and organic beings as a whole)
(Greek: "mass, bulk"; denotes relationship to a tumor, process of cancer formation; swelling, or mass)
(Greek > Latin: poppy juice; from the juice of plants or fruits)
(Latin: a suffix; state of, result of; he who, that which)
(Greek > Latin: a kind of whale; large sea creature)
(Greek: an organized structure; pertaining to a specific bodily part with a specific function or set of functions; instrument, tool, implement)
(Latin: a suffix; a place or instrument for performing the action of the main element; a place used for something)
(Greek: used as a suffix; rupture of an organ or vessel; a breaking forth, bursting)
(Latin: a suffix of adjectives ending in -ory; of or relating to; like; resembling)
(Greek: scrotum; a combining form denoting relationship to the scrotum or the pouch of skin which contains the testes, epididymides, and lower portions of the spermatic cords)
(Latin: swing, vibrate, move, motion; from oscillum, a diminutive form of osoris, "mouth, face, small face")
(Latin: yawning, the act of yawning; to gape [see the definitions for these words below])
(Latin: kiss; from "little mouth"; lip [diminutive of os-, "mouth"])
(Latin: full of, abounding in, having the qualities of, characteristic of something)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; actor, process, condition, or state of; result of; expresses a state or abnormal condition or process of some disease)
(Greek: to smell; pertaining to odor or to the sense of smell)
(Greek: oyster; creatures having or characterized by a type of hard shell)
(Greek: a suffix that means: state or condition of; diseased condition of)
(Latin: full of or having the qualities of; in chemistry, a suffix denoting that the element indicated by the name bearing it, has a valence lower than that denoted by the termination -ic; as, nitrous, sulphurous, etc., as contrasted with nitric, sulphuric, etc.)
(Greek > Latin: wood sorrel; the leaves of the wood sorrel are acidic to the taste)
(Greek: a "peak", but used by ecologists in the restricted sense of "foothill")
(Greek: something fixed or fastened together; a suffix that denotes conjoined twins, the first element of a word denotes the parts fused)
(Latin: roof of the mouth)
(a variety of palindrome words, both historical and modern)
(Greek palame > Latin palma: palm of the hand)
(Latin: marked with the palm of the hand; adorned with palm leaves; used primarily in the sense of "having five lobes that diverge from a common center" [as fingers from an open palm])
(Greek: pancreas [pan, "all" plus kreas, "flesh"; the idea apparently being that the pancreas is an organ composed entirely of glandular flesh])
(Greek: papyros > Latin > Old French; papyrus, an Egyptian rush [a reed plant] from which material was made for writing or drawing. Used in the sense of "fibrous material on which to write or to draw"; paper)
(Greek: by the side of, beside, past, beyond; contrary, wrong, irregular, abnormal)
(Latin: wall [of a house], walls; used in the extended sense of "the walls of a cavity or organ of the body")
(Greek: feeling, sensation, perception; suffering, disease, or disorder; a system of treating diseases)
(Latin: foot, feet; people often see this ped element in other words. When people refer to "pedal extremities", they mean "feet". When anyone pushes the pedals of a bicycle, it is done with the feet. A pedestrian must use the feet for walking. A quadruped has four feet while a centipede has "100 feet"; or a large number of them because it may be impossible to count all of them.)
(Latin: louse, lousy; of lice)
(Latin: basin; basin-shaped structure of the body)
(Greek: pemphix, "blister"; blistering skin diseases or a swelling of the skin that contains watery fluid and is caused by burning or irritation; a bump or small swelling on or beneath the skin)
(Maasai of Kenya)
(Latin: through, across, over; beyond, by means of)
(Greek: in botany, a suffix combining form meaning, "having a certain number or a certain shape of petals")
(Greek: a suffix; fixing [of a specified part]; attaching to, a fastening)
(Greek: lentil [bean]; lens of the eye)
(Greek: dusky; literally, having the color of the twilight sky)
(Greek via Latin: bone between two joints of a finger or toe; line of battle; from phalanx, heavy infantry in close order [from Greek antiquity])
(Greek: pharynx [the alimentary canal between the palate and the esophagus]; part of the neck or throat)
(Greek: cork, bark; cork tree; inner bark of trees)
(Greek: the twenty-first letter of the Greek alphabet; Φ, φ)
(Greek: fear, extreme fear of; morbid, excessive, irrational fear, or terror of something or someone; however, sometimes this Greek element also means a strong dislike, dread, or hatred for something or someone)
(Greek: the sixteenth letter of the Greek alphabet; Π, π)
(Latin: flat cake; cakelike mass, especially the uterine organ that connects the mother to the child by way of the umbilical cord)
(Latin: a literary thief; "plunderer, oppressor, kidnapper" [one who "abducts the child or slave of another"]; then by extension, to take and use the thoughts, writings, etc. of someone else and represent or claim them as one's own)
(importance of plankton in marine life)
(Latin: sole of the foot; to tread down with the sole or the flat bottom or the underside of the foot; and by extension, to level the ground for sowing seeds)
(Latin: common people, common multitude; as opposed to the patricians [upper-class citizens] of Roman times)
(Pluto, Roman god of wealth, ruled the dark underworld of myth; ninth planet from the sun)
(Greek: air, wind, breath; presence of air; spirit)
(a couple of similar opinions about people who borrow books)
(said to be one of the greatest poems written during World War I by Alan Seeger)
(an abnormal way of getting warm in the freezing conditions of a Canadian winter as expressed by Robert Service)
(an expression of admiration and appreciation for trees)
(a list of special poems)
(Greek: gray; pertaining to the "gray matter" of the nervous system, brain, and the spinal cord)
(Greek: city; method of government; citizenship, government, administration)
(Latin: fertilizing male elements of flowers; fine flour; milldust; spores; powder)
(marriage comes in a variety of formats)
(single marriages and multiple marriages)
(multiple marriages may be more widespread than we realize)
(linguistic terms for words with two or more meanings; usually, multiple meanings of a word or words)
(Latin: weight, weigh; heavy; to consider, to think about; closely related to this pend-, "hang, weigh, to hand down" unit of words)
(examples of portmanteau combinations or blended words)
(Greek > Latin: drinking; a word termination [suffix] denoting a relationship to drinking or the intake of fluids)
(Act of 1878, The Power of the County)
(Latin: power, strength, ability, able; having authority over; rule over, command of)
(Greek > Latin: to do, to exercise, doing; action, activity, practice; the opposite of theory; from the stem of prassein, "to do, to act")
(Latin: first, chief, foremost; of first rank)
(Greek > Latin: a prefix signifying before; forward, forth; for, in favor of; in front of; in place of, on behalf of; according to; as, to place before; to go before or forward, to throw forward)
(Egyptian schools for scribes prepared students so they could have the economic advantages of those who worked in this profession)
(scribe tools and symbols of one of the most important occupations of ancient Egyptian times)
(a presentation of simplified American-English pronunciations)
(Greek: one who stands before, in front of; refers primarily to the prostate gland [so named because it "stands before" the mouth of the bladder])
(an artificial substitute for a missing part of the body)
(Greek: first; foremost, front, earliest form of, original, primitive; chief, principal; usually used as a prefix)
(coined and presented by Royston M. Roberts, PhD, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Texas, Austin; among many other achievements)
(Greek: the twenty-third letter of the Greek alphabet; Ψ, ψ)
(a disease of the skin in which raised, rough, reddened areas appear, covered with fine silvery scales which cause aggravation)
(Greek: mind, spirit, consciousness; mental processes; the human soul; breath of life; literally, "that which breathes" or "breathing")
(Greek: fall, a falling down of an organ; drooping, sagging; corpse)
(Latin: adult, mature; sign of maturity, especially the growth of pubic hair; extended to mean the "pubic bone")
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
(Latin: originally, "that which one should be ashamed of"; the external organs of generation; from pudere "to cause shame".)
(Latin: flesh, meat, fleshy parts of the body; fruit pulp; used mostly in reference to the tissue that exists in a tooth)
(Latin: [diminutive of pupa, a young girl, doll or puppets] the pupil of the eye; including the larva of insects)
(Latin: putatus past participle of putare: to think over, consider, reckon, count; to trim, prune, lop, cut, clean, clear, unmixed)
(Greek: renal pelvis; especially of the kidney; from "tub, vat, basin, and trough")
(Greek: rump, bottom; rear end; behind part; the posterior or back part of the body)
(Greek: gatekeeper; lower gastric orifice through which the contents of the stomach enter the duodenum)
(Greek: pus; purulent, an infection or foreign material that causes a thick whitish-yellow fluid which results from the accumulation of white blood cells)
(Latin: of what sort; of what kind; how constituted)
(Latin: to make void, annul; originally from the Latin meaning of, "to shake violently, to shatter")
(Latin: complain, complaint, full of complaints; lack of satisfaction; lament, cry of sorrow and grief)
(Latin: oak; used to designate any of a variety of chemical substances derived from oak bark or acorns)
(a nourishment of consuming; too often a specialty of deception)
(suggestions; one of those situations where most people prefer to give than to receive)
(fluid of life from ancestors, parents, and transfusions; something that survives by circulating)
(slip-ups, goofs, flubs, and other blunders in many areas of communication; examples of incompetence and incongruity)
(slip-ups, goofs, flubs, and other blunders in many areas of communication; examples of language incompetence)
(slip-ups, goofs, flubs, and other blunders in many areas of communication; examples of language incompetence)
(a stomach surrounded by curiosity; little creatures that are happier than their parents because they don’t have children of their own)
(automatic electronic control systems; a cyberplague of electronic communications and miscommunications)
(the continual expectation of the unexpected)
(aspects of the imagination that are usually seen when the eyes are closed or images of mental thoughts)
(the consumption of edibles)
(a result of an instant on the lips to a lifetime on the hips)
(what youths rarely think about and what elders are constantly reminded of . . . most of the time)
(something written by people who were not there at the time; the art of reconciling fact with fiction or making guesses about things that can not be verified.)
(something that comes in two basic gender formats, but in billions of shapes and forms)
(results of special attractions)
(knowledge of various kinds from many sources)
(information and viewpoints that are constantly shifting courses in the midst of ever-changing news; knowing which perspectives to put into and what to keep out of a newspaper)
(medium of exchange of thoughts and ideas between people; the storehouse of accumulated knowledge through the centuries)
(medium of exchange of thoughts and ideas between people; the storehouse of accumulated knowledge through the centuries)
(pitching and tossing on the sea of matrimony)
(if patients are fortunate, this is the art of keeping them involved while nature cures their diseases)
(the science of the living world; including the good and the bad)
(logical fallacy; misrelations between the follow-up and the follow-through or nonsense of non sequence)
(the birthquake of modern times)
(an interval of confusion between wars)
(research of ideas or writings from other sources and making them worse—or better)
(a style of writing that can't be translated into the poetry of another language)
(conduct of public affairs for private advantages; people who have the gift of gab and the gift of grab)
(art of taking a long time to start to begin to get ready to commence)
(something people get tired of hearing someone say, "I told you it would happen.")
(a form of word humor when people fiddle with words and laugh at the resultant loony tunes: Considered by some to be the lowest form of humus, earthy wit that we all dig and often respond to with groans and moans)
(a form of word humor when people fiddle with words and laugh at the resultant loony tunes; considered by some to be the lowest form of humus, earthy wit, that we all dig and often respond to with groans and moans)
(a belief that teaches people to spend the best parts of their lives preparing to avoid the worst that could come after this life)
(patient study of the misjudgments and misstatements of others; digging and finding whatever turns up)
(a field in which scientists try to prolong the lives of people so they will have time to pay for the gadgets that are invented for them)
(signs that too often depict misinformation)
(a pleasure that comes with an abundance of words)
(presentations of living conceptions; the medium of exchange for thoughts and ideas between people)
(presentations of living conceptions; the medium of exchange for thoughts and ideas between people)
(a field of endeavor where many contribute but few are chosen)
(Latin: cluster of grapes or berries)
(there is a lack of understanding as to how RFID works)
(some of the of terms used in RFID technology)
(list of articles and special information about RFID)
(Latin: ray, radiating [the Latin word for the spokes of a wheel is radius]; spoke, staff, rod)
(Latin: straight [intestine], direct, right; that is, "the part of the large intestine that ends at the anus")
(therapeutic applications to the feet for greater health)
(Greek > Latin: to recollect, to remember; act of recalling; to recall to memory; to remind of past events)
(millions of photoreceptor cells residing in the human retina gather light and transmit signals to the brain)
(Latin: innermost tunic of the eye; from ret[e], "net" plus -ina, "like")
(Greek: a flow, wave; current of a stream, current; electrical current)
(Greek: rhetorike tekhne, "the technique or art of public speaking" > Latin: orator; that which is spoken)
(Greek: the seventeenth letter of the Greek alphabet; Ρ, ρ)
(Latin: to laugh, laugh at; capable of exciting laughter; laughing)
(when all roads led to Rome)
(A Special Publication for Logophiles (YOU?) and for Those Who Want a Handy Reference to Latin-Greek Elements Used in English-Derived Words)
(a Czech word, robota meaning "serf" or "slave" or "forced work" which is now applied to any manufactured device that is capable of doing work ordinarily done by human beings)
(links to topics about robots, robotic devices, and the science of robotics)
(for robots, a new way of walking like humans)
(Conrad Röntgen (Roentgen), Discoverer of X-rays)
(German: radiation, "x-ray"; X-ray; 1896, translation of German X-strahl, from X, "algebraic symbol for an unknown quantity", + Strahl, "beam, ray")
(chapter listings with subdivision links for easier reading of Those about to Die book by Daniel P. Mannix)
(historical perspectives for a better understanding of Roman events in their arenas)
(Greek > Latin: wrinkle, to make full of wrinkles; ridge, fold)
(Latin: country, farm, land, open land; of the country, simple; living in the country)
(Latin: healthy, whole; by extension: cure, heal, take care of; sound in mind and body)
(Where did the word “sandwich” really come from?)
(More history and updates to the "sandwich")
(word origin and the historical development of sarcophagus and related sarcasm, sarcastic)
(Latin: poetic medley, satire: the use of irony, sarcasm, or ridicule in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice, folly, etc.)
(Saturn, Roman god of the harvest and a planet; sixth planet from the sun)
(Greek: boat-shaped [often refers to bones]; shaped like the hull of a boat; dug out like a boat; trench; deep vessel)
(Latin: the flat, triangular bone in the back of the shoulder; the shoulder blade)
(Latin: of a school, referring to a place of learning and education)
(Latin: from Medieval Latin sciatica, in sciatica passio, "sciatic disease", from feminine of sciaticus, "sciatic"; from Latin ischiadicus, "of pain in the hip"; from Greek iskhiadikos, iskhias, iskhiados, "pain in the hips"; from iskhion, "hip joint".)
(international students in scientific areas of study need to possess a solid grasp of English to succeed as scientists or even to lay claim to being scientifically literate citizens of the world)
(international students in scientific areas of study need to possess a solid grasp of English to succeed as scientists or even to lay claim to being scientifically literate citizens of the world)
(lists of careers in science with short descriptions)
(Latin: pertaining to, or having scurvy [a disease resulting from a deficiency of vitamin C in the body, characterized by weakness, anemia, spongy gums, bleeding from the mucous membranes, etc.])
(a classical example of phobias in famous art work)
(messages from sufferers of this phobia)
(Latin: the pouch that holds the testes; a purse; probably a variant of scortum, "a skin, hide"; or of scrautum, "a leather bag for holding arrows"; akin to scrupus, "a sharp stone")
(Latin: shield; a broad piece of metal or another suitable material, held by straps or a handle attached on one side, used as a protection against blows or missiles.)
(Latin: borrowed from Old French saison, seison, "a sowing, planting", from Latin sationem, "a sowing"; in Vulgar Latin, "time of sowing, seeding time")
(Latin: tallow, suet, fat, fatty; grease; by extension, "pertaining to a suetlike secretion of the body")
(Latin: from Old French seculer; from Late Latin sæcularis, worldly, living in the world, not belonging to a religious order; from saecularis, pertaining to a generation or age; from saeculum, saeclum, period of a man's life, generation; period of a hundred years)
(John Robertson, a committed lexicographer who is utilizing the past and the present to provide word information for our modern age)
(Arabic: the gift of finding interesting things by chance; the faculty of finding valuable or agreeable things not sought for; an apparent talent for making fortunate discoveries accidentally)
(Latin: bristle [short stiff hair on an animal or plant, or a mass of short stiff hairs growing; especially, on a hog's back or a man's face])
(Hebrew: the grave; hell; pit [a gloomy netherworld for departed spirits; Shoel is the counterpart of Hades and Tartarus])
(just a few of the many species of shrews)
(Latin: scrinium, a case, chest, box, or receptacle; especially, one in which are deposited sacred relics, bones of a saint, or sacred books and documents)
(Greek: iron; things made of iron)
(Greek: the eighteenth letter of the Greek alphabet; Σ, σ [beginning of word], ς [end of word])
(Latin: absence of sound; quiet, still)
(French: an outline portrait or an illustration of one color)
(Origins of silk and present production)
(Latin: a suffix found at the end of some words that make certain verbs become nouns.)
(Greek > Latin: dried up, withered, mummy; the bony and some of the cartilaginous framework of the body of animals; including humans)
(slavery not only existed in the past, but it still exists in parts of the present world)
(Latin: glasswort, saltwort; hence, sodium carbonate [which may be derived from the ashes of burned glasswort or saltwort])
(Latin: base, ground, soil, bottom; the lowest part of something; sole of the foot or a shoe)
(Latin: room, area, distance, stretch of time; space)
(units that should be seen because of their important content, illustrations, quizzes, and links to any additional related information)
(as seen in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, 1599, we have this famous speech)
(Greek: a wedge; the sphenoid bone, a wedge-shaped bone found at the base of the skull)
(Greek: ball, round, around; globe, global; body of globular form; by extension, circular zone, circular area)
(Greek > Latin: that which binds tightly, press together; band, lace; hence, muscle that closes an aperture of the body; a ringlike band of muscle fibers that constricts a passage or closes a natural orifice)
(Latin: breath of life, breath, breathing; mind; spirit, "soul"; courage)
(Greek: spleen, "the inward parts;" the elongated accessory lymphatic organ of the vascular [blood] system)
(Latin: betrothed man, groom; betrothed woman, bride; both come from sponsus, past participle of spondere, "to promise, betroth" from Old French, espous [masculine, male]; espouse [feminine, female])
(Greek: bunch of grapes, uvula [that which resembles a grape hanging from a stock]; staphylococci, grape-shaped bacteria occurring in irregular clusters)
(Greek: a trickling; oozing; to drip, dripping; denoting a flow of some kind, or from some source)
(Greek: an inscribed stone slab; a block of stone, gravestone; a column, a pillar [also a reference to certain plant structures])
(Latin: sneeze, act of sneezing)
(Latin: impel, goad, sting, spur, incentive, full of incentives)
(Latin: compress, compressed, to press together, to pack; related to: stalk, log, stock, trunk of a tree)
(Actual translation of the Iktho Story)
(translation of "The Lupus and the Tragas" story)
(varieties of mostly Latin-Greek based story translations)
("The Emperor's New Clothes" by Hans Christian Andersen is a fable about the pitfalls of political self-aggrandizement and the fear of people to face reality even when they know that the reality of the situation is untrue)
(Greek: column; pillar; pillarlike implement or structure, especially the styloid process of the temporal bone)
(Latin: self, of oneself)
(a close, prolonged association between different organisms of different species that may benefit each member; commensalism; mutualism)
(Latin: Syphil[us], the eponymous main character of Girolamo Fracastoro's poem "Syphilus sive Morbus Gallicus" [Syphilus, or the French Disease], published at Verona, Italy [1530])
(Latin: talis, "such like" or "such"; talio, "punishment equal in severity to the wrong that occasioned it" or "exaction of payment or payment in kind")
(Latin: at length; in the sense of "lengthwise, one behind the other")
(Greek > Latin: confusion, disturbance, irritation, trouble, lack of calmness)
(Greek > Latin: ankle, tarsal plate of the eyelid; from Greek tarsos, frame of wickerwork; broad, flat surface, as also in tarsos podos, the flat of the foot, instep of the foot; the edge of the eyelid)
(Greek: the nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet; Τ, τ)
(Greek: arrangement, order, put in order, orientation; the movements or directed responses of motile organisms to stimuli, as indicated by the combining roots)
(advances in computers, entertainment, and science top list of tech breakthroughs)
(Greek: marsh, pool, standing or stagnent water; mud of a pool)
(Latin: sanctuary, consecrated place; an open place marked out by the augur for the observation of the sky)
(Latin: sides of the head near the eyes; temple bones)
(Latin: a witness, one who stands by; from testicle, one of the two oval male gonads supported in the scrotum by its tissues and suspended by the spermatic cord)
(Greek > Latin: inner room, bedchamber; so called by Galen because chambers at the base of the brain were thought to supply animal spirits to the optic nerves; thalamus, the middle part of the diencephalon (the area in the center of the brain just above the brain stem that includes the thalamus and hypothalamus) which relays sensory impulses to the cerebral cortex of the brain)
(learn how to avoid being a malapropist)
(Greek > Latin: treasure, treasury, storehouse, chest; a treasury of words)
(Greek: the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet; Θ, θ; theta symbol, ϑ)
(Greek: thorax, chest [part of the body between the neck and the abdomen; "breastplate, breast, chest"])
(Greek: clot, lump; aggregation of blood factors)
(Greek > Modern Latin: thymus gland, glands; warty glanular growth resembling a bunch of thyme [aromatic bush leaves])
(Greek > Latin: a genus of plants, the thyme)
(Latin: to ring, to jingle; formed by reduplication (for the sake of emphasis) from the base of Latin tinnire, which is of imitative origin.)
(Latin: a suffix forming nouns from verbs of condition and action; an act or process: resumption, absorption; state or condition, redemption, exhaustion; something resulting from or otherwise related to an act or process, assumption, friction)
(Greek > Latin: any person or something of enormous size or power)
(Greek: childbirth, delivery, a reference to the production of offspring; that which is brought forth)
(a list of articles about the subject of toilets)
(toilet paper is a very modern product of convenience)
(an excess of nutrients flowing from the land to the sea has created serious environment problems)
(an excess of nutrients flowing from the land to the sea has created serious environmental problems)
(an excess of nutrients flowing from the land to the sea has created serious environmental problems)
(an excess of nutrients flowing from the land to the sea has created serious environmental problems)
(extensive information about the physical aspects of the tongue and how it functions)
(Greek > Latin: sound, tone; that which is stretched, a stretching, a straining, a pitch of the voice, a musical note)
(Latin: small rounded mass of tissue, especially of lymphoid tissue; tonsil)
(Greek: tragoidia, a compound of tragos, "goat" and aeidein, "to sing"; goat song)
(Latin: across, through, over, beyond; on the far side of)
(funding is invigorating a field which challenges some traditional aspects of science)
(a sub-field of tribology involving contact geometries)
(Latin: to assign, to allot, to bestow, to give, to grant; from tribe, to give out among the tribes was tribuere which is the source of many of the words located in this unit)
(Latin: to rub; to thresh, to grind; to wear away; from tritus, past participle of terere, "to rub")
(Greek: a suffix referring to a device, tool, or instrument; more generally, used in the names of any kind of chamber or apparatus used in experiments)
(Greek: trokhilia, "pulley, system of pulleys, roller"; Latin: trochlea, "system of pulleys")
(Latin: a suffix; result of, the act of, means of)
(Latin: a suffix; state, quality, condition of)
(Greek > Latin: drum, kettledrum; stretched membrane; from "blow, impression, to beat"; a part of the ear)
(Greek: blind, blindness [typhlos, blind]; denotes relationship to the cecum or the first part of the large intestine, forming a dilated pouch; also called the "blindgut" or "blind intestine" [caecum, "blind, blind gut", typhlon, cecum])
(Greek: to smoke; smoke, mist, vapor, hot vapor, steam, cloud, fog; stupor [insensibility, numbness, dullness]; used exclusively in medicine as a reference to fever accompanied by stupor or a clouding of the mind resulting from the fever caused by a severe-infectious disease)
(unaware that she was a carrier of a deadly disease)
(Latin: elbow; larger bone of the forearm [from Greek: olene])
(Latin: a suffix; tending to do, inclined to; full of)
(Latin: pertaining to the navel, umbilical cord; a protuberance or swelling; related to umbo, the boss [a convex elevation or knob] of a shield)
(Greek: the twentieth letter of the Greek alphabet; Υ, υ; upsilon symbol with hook, ϒ)
(Greek: heaven [s], vault of heaven; hence "the sky"; from Uranus, the god of the sky; in medicine, the palate, roof, or top of the mouth)
(Greek: roof of the mouth; literally, "little vault of heaven")
(Latin: a suffix that denotes an act or result, result of the act of)
(Greek: urethra, a slitlike tube conveying urine from the internal urethral orifice of the bladder)
(Latin: loaning money at extremely high rates of interest; to use)
(Latin: womb; hollow, muscular organ of the female reproductive system in which the fertilized ovum, or egg, and the fetus, unborn baby, is nourished and grows until birth)
(Latin: grapelike; the uvea, the [grapelike] surface of the iris of the eye)
(Latin: a pendent, fleshy mass of tissue hanging from the soft palate above the root of the tongue; mucous membrane)
(Latin: originally, "sheath, scabbard, the husk of grain"; in medical science, the vagina or lowest part of the female genital tract, the canal that leads from the vulva to the uterus)
(Latin: wall, rampart; row or line of stakes)
(Latin: a doorlike structure in a passageway that hinders or prevents the reflux or flowing back of its contents)
(Latin: steam, mist, very small drops of water)
(Latin: a vessel or vessels; including, tubes, ducts, or canals that convey and circulate fluids; such as, blood, lymph, or sap, through the bodies of animals or plants)
(from Latin vates, seer, prophet; sooth-sayer; prophesy, prophecy; which should not be confused with Vatican, "Pope's palace in Rome" or Vaticanism, "doctrine of papal supremacy and infallibility")
(Latin: animating, enlivening; vigorous, vigor, active; to be alive, activity, to quicken; then a quickening action of growing; a specific sense of "plant cultivated for food, edible herb, or root" is first recorded in 1767; the differences between the meanings from its original links with "life, liveliness" was completed in the early twentieth century, when vegetable came to be used for an "inactive person".)
(Latin: quantity having magnitude and direction; carrier, bearer, conveyer; from the stem of vehere, "to carry, to convey, to cart")
(terms of Venery or group names from traditional terms of the hunt and some more modern creations that attempt to describe group characteristics of animals, humans, and groupings)
(Latin: [little] belly; hence, "a small cavity; especially of the heart or brain")
(Latin: stomach, belly or a relationship to the abdomen or the front or anterior aspect of the body)
(Latin: goddess of love; love, loveliness, attractiveness, beauty, charm)
(Venus, Roman goddess; Aphrodite, Greek goddess; second planet from the sun)
(Latin: stand in awe of, to be awed at; wonder or admiration of; dread mixed with veneration or great respect)
(Latin: spring, of the spring [season])
(Latin: joint, especially of the spinal column)
(the study of flags and their significance)
(more about the study of flags and their significance)
(more about the study of flags and their significance)
(Latin: tuft of hair, fleece; a villus, a small protrusion, especially arising from a mucous membrane)
(Latin > Italian: a person skilled in one of the fine arts, especially in music)
(Latin: internal organs; all that is under the skin, all parts in the body except flesh or muscles; entrails; any large interior organ in any of the three great cavities of the body; specifically, those within the chest; such as, the heart or lungs; or in the abdomen; such as, the liver, pancreas, and intestines; and in the head; such as, the brain)
(numbers of global visitors as indicated by the flags and initials of the countries from which the visitors have come)
(Latin: yolk, yolk of an egg)
(seeing English words in three vocabulary quiz types from different perspectives for a greater enhancement of English-word skills)
(unit of measurement of electromotive force, or pressure, in an electrical circuit, or 'push', named for Alessandro Volta (1745-1827) renowned for his pioneering work in electricity)
(Explorations of the Planets)
(The translation of the story with the interpretations of the right answers in parentheses)
(an abundance of Word Information about English Vocabulary derived from Latin and Greek sources)
(Greek: the fourteenth letter of the Greek alphabet; Ξ, ξ)
(Greek: wood; the first element of various scientific and technical words that refer to wood)
(Greek: a suffix that means; state of, condition of, quality of, act of)
(Greek: the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet; Ζ, ζ)
(the scientific study of animals)
(Greek: diseases communicated from one kind of animal to another or to human beings; usually restricted to diseases transmitted naturally to man from animals)
(Greek: diseases communicated from one kind of animal to another or to human beings; usually restricted to diseases transmitted naturally to man from animals)
(origin and background of the study of animals in motion)
Word Entries containing the term: “of
A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A committee is a group of people who keep minutes and waste hours.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A kangaroo is the largest species of grasshopper known to humans.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A keyring is used for holding all kinds of keys, except the key to success.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A known carcinogen suspected of causing cancer
As seen in a report on WHIO Television following a 1986 train wreck in Ohio. The wreck spilled thousands of gallons of Xylene, a known carcinogen.
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 1)
A lot of money is tainted: It taint yours and it taint mine.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A man's home is his castle, in a manor of speaking.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A plateau is a high form of flattery.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A sponge is something that is full of holes but it still can hold water.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
ahead of the curve (s) (noun); ahead of the curves (pl)
Thinking forward of a trend or trends.
This entry is located in the following unit: curvi-, curv- (page 1)
American Institute of Philanthropy
The American Institute of Philanthropy (AIP) is a nonprofit organization which was created by Daniel Borochoff in 1992 to address the continuing need for information regarding the financial efficiency, accountability, governance, and fundraising practices of charities.

Charity financial reporting can be inconsistent, unclear, and occasionally unethical or even fraudulent.

An autobiography is a history of cars.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
An Introduction to the Biology of Marine Life

James L. Sumich, Grossmont College; Wm. C. Brown Publishers, College Edition; Dubuque, Iowa; 1988.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 1)
anacoustic zone; zone of silence (s) (noun); anacoustic zones; zones of silence (pl)
An area in outer space where sound cannot be transmitted: The anacoustic zone is said to be the upper portion of the earth's atmosphere starting at a hundred miles (160 kilometers) and on into interplanetary space, where sound cannot be projected because gas molecules are too far apart to serve as a transferring medium.

The anacoustic zone is also known as the "zone of silence".

Ancestors or Latin origins of words in English (carpet, scarce, excerpt):
It appears to be impossible that such far-flung words as carpet, scarce, and excerpt all come from the same Latin verb; however, they do, and their histories show the astonishing and unpredictable way some words have developed.

The word carpet, for example, ultimately derives from the Latin carpo, which meant to "pluck" or to "card" wool, and it is believed that the first carpets were of wooly cloth made of unravelled threads.

Then there is the term scarce, which English inherited from the French escars, "scanty", originally from the Latin ex, "out", and carpo, "pluck". It's like "plucking" from the cookie jar until the cookies become "scanty" and scarce.

Another related word is excerpt, from Latin excerptus (ex, "out" and carpo, "pluck") which refers to something that has been "plucked out" of its context.

The result is that the idea of "plucking" streams through the three widely divergent words just as a scarce thread of color can be woven through the carpet with which this excerpt started.

These basic words and their related forms can be seen in this carpo-, carp- (cerp-) unit of "to pluck, to pick out, to gather, to select" words.

This entry is located in the following unit: carpo-, carp- (cerp-) + (page 1)
Animals: A Variety of Lions
A pictionary of lions. from African countries.
This entry is located in the following unit: Animal Index (page 1)
anulus iridis, border of iris, ring of iris
Either of two zones on the anterior surface of the iris, separated by a circular line concentric with the pupillary border.
This entry is located in the following units: annul-, anul- (page 1) -ulus, -olus, -ulum, -ola (page 1)
apex cordis, apex of the heart
The lowest and leftmost point of the heart represented by the left ventricle.
This entry is located in the following unit: apex- + (page 1)
apraxia of speech (s), apraxia of speeches (pl) (nouns)
A severe speech disorder shown by an inability to speak or a severe struggle to say something clearly: "Apraxia of speech is noticed when the oral-motor muscles of a patient don't or can't normally respond to commands from the brain or when the brain can't normally send such commands."

"Even when a person can understand what another person says, if he has apraxia of speech, he can't physically position his own speech muscles and the sequence of muscle movements that are necessary to produce understandable words or to say anything so others can recognize what he is trying to communicate."

This entry is located in the following unit: praxis-, -praxsis, -praxia, -praxic, -praxi- (page 1)
April 24, 2007: Words of historical and current interest
As seen in the International Herald Tribune:

French candidates scramble for center: Sarkozy and Royal woo Bayrou voters

Takeover to create a banking behemoth: ABN AMRO accepts offer from Barclays valued at 67 billion euro

Boris Yeltsin, a flawed hero, dies; Russia's democratic father was a praised, and reviled, figure

Alpine village will break hundred years of solitude: Anticipation and dread for Austrian tunnel

From chaos, Wikipedia shapes a breaking story

U.S. Envoy to Germany joins fray over energy

Europe approves tightening of sanctions against Iran

Charges of fraud abound as ruling party wins in Nigeria

Classes resume as Virginia campus fights to regain balance

Romanian lawmakers set date for impeachment vote

Boris Yeltsin's bequest

Bagging eternal plastics

Unintended consequences

The elusive man who May have invented jazz

American talent feted in London: Energy of young New York designers goes on display

assessment of carotid pulse
A determination of the pulse of the carotid artery, palpated (gently touched) by gently pressing a finger in the area between the larynx and the sternocleidomastoid muscle in the neck which turns or rotates the head.
This entry is located in the following unit: carotid-, caroti-, carotio- (page 1)
Bacteria: The back entrance of a cafeteria.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Biology is the study of anything that comes in twos.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Biometrics: Benefits of Biometrics in Controlling Access
A biometric tool that measures bodily features for better security.
Biomimetics: Index of Natural Imitations
Biosphere of Habitats
The zone at and near the earth's surface in which all living things are located:

Ranging from submicroscopic viruses to giant sequoia trees, this horde of organisms has adapted to almost every kind of environment, from hot springs to glacial ice.

Such habitats involve the interactions of plants and animals with various parts of the earth and are involved in many important earth processes.

Coal and petroleum have been formed from the remains of prehistoric organisms.

Bacteria played an essential role in the development of certain types of iron ore.

Finally, the study of fossils has provided a great deal of information about earth's history and the development of life.

—This section was compiled from a presentation in
The Planet We Live On: Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Earth Sciences;
Cornelius S. Hurlbut, Jr., Editor; Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers;
New York; 1976, page 94.

Also see "The Development and Explanations of Life and Its Characteristics for additional information related to this subject.

This entry is located in the following units: Habitats for the Living (page 1) sphero-, spher-, -sphere- (page 5)
Book: Authenticity Challenged, Part 1 of 2
It's possible that the content of A Million Little Pieces is filled with fabrications, falsehoods, and other fakery.
This entry is located in the following unit: Books and Books: Index of Articles (page 1)
Book: Authenticity Challenged, Part 2 of 2
Other writers join in asking if A Million Little Pieces is nonfiction that is full of nonfact.
This entry is located in the following unit: Books and Books: Index of Articles (page 1)
Books and Internet Sources of Info





Any purchase you make with Amazon.com will provide a small monetary contribution towards the upkeep of this site at no extra cost to you, the purchaser.



Books and Internet Sources of Info
It's possible that the content of a subject on-line can be more powerful than a traditional linear book.
This entry is located in the following unit: Books and Books: Index of Articles (page 1)
Browser's Book of Beginnings
"Hieroglyphics, 3100 B.C., Egypt" by Charles Panati; Houghton Mifflin Company; Boston; 1984; pages 69 & 70.
camera anterior bulbi, anterior chamber of the eye, camera oculi major
The anterior portion of the anterior segment of the eyeball, situated between the cornea anteriorly and the lens and iris posteriorly.

It contains aqueous humor that drains through the iridocorneal angle at its periphery and communicates with the posterior chamber through the pupil.

This entry is located in the following unit: camer- + (page 1)
capsule of Tenon
This entry is located in the following unit: capsulo-, capsul-, caps- (page 1)
capsule of the kidney
This entry is located in the following unit: capsulo-, capsul-, caps- (page 1)
cicatrization of scars
The tendency of a scar to contract in the surface area and thereby increasing in thickness.
This entry is located in the following unit: cicatri-, cicatr- + (page 1)
Colossus of Rhodes (s) (noun)
A gigantic bronze statue of Apollo set at the entrance to the harbor of ancient Rhodes about 285 B.C.
This entry is located in the following unit: coloss- (page 1)
Completed Units of Special Compositions, Topics, or Subjects that Provide Special Information
Completed Units of Special Compositions.
This entry is located in the following unit: Completed Units of Words and Special Compositions about Words (page 1)
concussion of the brain
A concussion is not a bruise to the brain caused by hitting a hard surface. In fact, no physical swelling or bleeding is usually seen on radiological scans.

Causes of some brain concussions

    A brain concussion can cause immediate and usually temporary impairment of brain function such as of thinking, vision, equilibrium and consciousness

  • Impact:
  • The concussion occurs from impact when the head accelerates rapidly and then is stopped, or from spinning when the head is spun rapidly and then is stopped.

    Impact to the brain can occur when the head slams into a hard surface.

    The skull is stopped by the hard surface but the brain, floating in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), can still move and is shaken.

  • Spinning:
  • Spinning of the brain can occur when a blow causes the head to snap rapidly.

    The skull then stops spinning but the brain, floating in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), can still move and is damaged.

  • Violent trauma:
  • Violent trauma, whether it be from shaking or spinning, causes the brain cells to become depolarized and fire all their neurotransmitters at once in an abrupt cascade, flooding the brain with chemicals; there is a sudden flood of ions (including sodium, potassium, and calcium, and deadening receptors in the brain that are associated with learning and memory.

This entry is located in the following unit: cuss- (page 1)
Condescending is a convict escaping down the wall of a prison using a rope.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Congress is the opposite of progress.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Coulomb's law, Law of Electrostatic Attraction
1. A law which describes the electric force between charged objects which states that:
  • Like charges repel each other and unlike charges attract each other.
  • The attraction or repulsion acts along the line between the two charges.
  • The size of the force varies inversely as the square of the distance between the two charges.
  • The size of the force is proportional to the value of each charge.
2. In physics, a law stating that the electrostatic force between two charged bodies is proportional to the product of the amount of charge on the bodies divided by the square of the distance between them.

If the bodies are oppositely charged, one positive and one negative, they are attracted toward one another; if the bodies are similarly charged, both positive or both negative, the force between them is repulsive.

Coulomb's law applies only when the charged bodies are much smaller than the distance separating them and therefore can be treated approximately as point charges.

creature of habit
Anyone who always wants to do the same thing in the same way.
This entry is located in the following unit: creat- + (page 2)
crura of anthelix or antihelix
The two ridges on the external ear marking the superior termination of the anthelix, or antihelix, and bounding the triangular fossa.

The antihelix is the semicircular ridge on the ear anterior and parallel to the helix (winding structure) of the ear.

This entry is located in the following unit: cruro-, crur-; crus (page 1)
cystic fibrosis, CF; mucoviscidosis; fibrocystic disease of the pancreas
One of the most common hazardous genetic (inherited) diseases, cystic fibrosis affects the exocrine glands and is characterized by the production of abnormal secretions, leading to abnormally viscous mucus build-up.

This accumulation of mucus can impair the pancreas and, secondarily, the intestine. Mucous build-up in lungs tends progressively to impair respiration.

Without treatment, CF results in death for 95% of affected children before the age of five.

Department of Redundancy Department
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 6)
deterioration of attention (s) (noun), deterioration of attentions (pl)
Impairment of the ability to maintain one's level of concentration despite an apparent desire to do so and a lack of competing thoughts that explain ordinary inattentiveness: The patient in the nursing home appeared to be suffering from a deterioration of attention which was revealed when she would struggle to concentrate and was unable to do it.
dictionary of lexicomedy (s) (noun), dictionaries of lexicomedies (pl)
A publication that is bound to provide humor which emphasizes linguicomedy or definitional wit: "A dictionary of lexicomedy provides examples of facetious or humorous definitions."
Diplomacy is the art of getting other people to do it your way.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
direct measurement of electrolytes (s) (noun), direct measurements of electrolytes (pl)
The measurement of serum or blood ions; such as, sodium, chloride, and potassium, without prior dilution of the sample: The direct measurement of electrolytes is considered to be more nearly accurate than analysis by indirect methods because it is not susceptible to error in cases of hyperlipidemia or excess lipids (fatty, greasy, oily, and waxy compounds) in the blood.
This entry is located in the following unit: recti-, rect- (page 1)
District of Columbia (D.C. or DC)
A Federal district, the capital of the United States; coextensive with the city of Washington on the Potomac River.
This entry is located in the following unit: distric- (page 1)
Dolors of Mary
In Roman Catholicism, a devotion that commemorates, The Seven Sorrows of Mary, or seven sorrowful or anxious occasions in her life.
This entry is located in the following unit: doloro-, dolor-, dolori- , dol- (page 2)
eburnation of dentin
A condition observed in arrested dental caries wherein decalcified dentin is burnished and takes on a polished, often brown-stained appearance.
electric line of force, electric flux line, electric flux, electrostatic flux
1. An imaginary line in which each segment of the line is parallel to the direction of the electric field or the direction of the electric displacement at that point, and the density of the collection of the line is relative to the electric field or the electrical displacement.
2. The electric lines of force that make up an electric field or region.
3. The integral over a surface of the component of the electric displacement perpendicular to the surface and equal to the number of electric lines of forces crossing the surface.
This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 11)
electromagnetic system of units, electromagnetic units, emu (noun) (plural used as a singular)
1. A system of electrical units, based on the centimeter, gram, and second, in which a unit of magnetic pole is by definition such that two units of the same sign placed one centimeter apart in free space will repel each other with a force of one dyne.

Units in the system are usually presented with the prefix ab-; such as, abampere, abvolt, etc.

2. A centimeter-gram-second system of electric and magnetic units in which the unit of current is defined as the current which, if maintained in two straight parallel wires having infinite length and being one centimeter apart in vacuum, would produce between these conductors a force of two dynes (units of force) per centimeter of length.

Other units are derived from this definition by assigning unit coefficients in equations relating electric and magnetic quantities.

This entry is located in the following units: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 42) uni-, un- (page 1)
electromagnetic theory of light
1. The theory which states that electromagnetic and light waves have identical properties.
2. The theory that light consists of electromagnetic radiation and therefore obeys Maxwell's equations; contrasted with earlier concepts that light was a stream of tiny particles or light was a wave in a medium of ether.

Maxwell's equations consists of the four fundamental equations that describe the behavior of electric and magnetic fields in time and space and the dependence of these fields on the distribution and behavior of electric charges and currents.

These four partial differential equations relate to the electric and magnetic fields to their sources, charge density, and current density.

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 42)
electromyography of pelvic floor sphincter
An electrodiagnostic test performed to evaluate the neuromuscular function of the urinary or anal sphincter (circular muscle that constricts a passage or closes a natural opening).

It is done most often in patients with urinary or fecal incontinence.

electrostatic unit of charge
The quantity of electrical charge which repels an equal charge at a poiont in a vacuum at a distance of one centimeter with a force of one dyne.
This entry is located in the following units: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 86) uni-, un- (page 2)
Emerging Areas of Technology, Part 1
This entry is located in the following unit: Information Technology (IT): Units Listed (page 1)
Emerging Areas of Technology, Part 2, Numbers 1-10
Emerging Technology, Part 2, Parts 1-10.
This entry is located in the following unit: Information Technology (IT): Units Listed (page 1)
English days of the week
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
English months of the year
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
equator bulbi oculi, equator of the eyeball
An imaginary line encircling the eyeball midway between the anterior and posterior poles.
This entry is located in the following unit: equ-, equi- (page 2)
eschatology of Jehovah's Witnesses
A belief that Jesus Christ has been ruling in heaven as king since 1914 (a date they believe was prophesied in Scripture), and that after that time a period of cleansing occurred, resulting in the selection of Jehovah's Witnesses by God to be his people in the year 1919.

They also believe that those who reject their message will be destroyed including those who willfully refuse to obey God and that such action will shortly take place at Armageddon, ensuring that the beginning of the new earthly society will be composed of willing subjects of that kingdom.

This entry is located in the following units: eschato-, eschat- (page 1) -ology, -logy, -ologist, -logist (page 26)
Esthesia: History of Anesthesia, Part 1 of 3

Anesthesia, Part 1 of 3.

This entry is located in the following unit: Esthesia: Index of Esthesia-Related Units (page 1)
Esthesia: History of Anesthesia, Part 2 of 3

Anesthesia, Part 2 of 3.

This entry is located in the following unit: Esthesia: Index of Esthesia-Related Units (page 1)
Esthesia: History of Anesthesia, Part 3 of 3

Anesthesia, Part 3 of 3.

This entry is located in the following unit: Esthesia: Index of Esthesia-Related Units (page 1)
etherial (adjective) (an outdated or archaic form of ethereal
This entry is located in the following unit: ethero-, ether-, aethero-, aether-, aither- (page 1)
extension of infarction
An increase in the size of a myocardial infarction, occurring after the initial infarction and usually accompanied by a return of acute symptoms; such as, angina unrelieved by appropriate medicines.
This entry is located in the following unit: farc-, fars- (page 1)
feces in the news, having no toilets harming billions of people

A lack of toilets is severely jeopardizing the health of 2.6 billion people in the developing world who are forced to discard their excrement, or feces, in bags, buckets, fields, and ditches.

"The lack of a safe, private, and convenient toilet is a daily source of indignity and undermines health, education, and income generation," according to Beyond Scarcity: Power, Poverty, and the Global Water Crisis, a report commissioned by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Much of Europe and North America built sanitation systems in the 1800s to keep humans and their drinking water away from pathogen-bearing fecal matter that can transmit cholera, diarrhea, typhoid, and parasites.

Nearly every other person in the developing world today lacks access to improved sanitation, and 1.1 billion people, one-sixth of the world's population, get their water from sources contaminated by human and animal feces, the report says.

—From "Lack of Toilets Harming Health of Billions, UN Report Says"
by Kelly Hearn for National Geographic News;
Published, November 15, 2006.
This entry is located in the following unit: feco-, fec-, faeco-, faec-, feci- + (page 2)
female organs of reproduction
The various organs of reproduction include the following:
  • The ovaries, which produce eggs (ova) and female hormones.
  • The Fallopian tubes, which transport the egg from the ovaries to the uterus.
  • The uterus, which receives the egg for fertilization and provides a growth environment for the developing embryo and fetus.
  • The cervix, the lower, narrow part of the uterus that opens into the vagina; and the vagina.
  • The muscular canal that extends from the cervix to the outside of the body and enables sperm to enter the female reproductive tract.
This entry is located in the following units: fem-, femi- (page 2) organo-, organ- (page 1)
fibrous dysplasia of bone
A disease of bone marked by the thinning of the cortex and replacement of bone marrow by gritty fibrous tissue containing bony spicules (sharp-pointed pieces), producing pain, disability, and gradually increasing deformity.

Only one bone may be involved (fibrous dysplasia, monostotic) or several (fibrous dysplasia, polyostotic).

This entry is located in the following units: dys- (page 15) fibro-, fibr-, fiber- + (page 5)
fimbria hippocampi, fimbria of hippocampus, corpus fimbriatum hippocampi
1. The band of white matter along the median edge of the ventricular surface of the hippocampus.
2. A narrow band of fibrous white matter (myelinated axons), which form the fornix (various arched structures), situated on the medial ventricular surface of the hippocampus (area buried deep in the forebrain that helps regulate emotion and memory).
This entry is located in the following unit: fimbri-, fimbr- (page 1)
fimbriae of uterine tube
The numerous divergent fringelike processes on the distal part of the infundibulum (funnel-shaped structure) of the uterine tube.
This entry is located in the following unit: fimbri-, fimbr- (page 1)
First or top position, King of the gods and ruler of mankind.
Greek: Zeus
Latin: Jupiter (Jove)

Symbols: Eagle, thunderbolts, and oak.

This entry is located in the following unit: gods and goddesses of the Olympic Council (page 1)
Flags of the World with Countries and Languages
Twelve groups of World Flags are available in these units which describe the various countries, principalities, dependencies, etc. of the world including the various related languages.

You make take advantage of the following flag units with a simple click:

Flags of the World, Part 1 (Afghanistan to Azerbaijan)

Flags of the World, Part 2 (Bahamas to Burundi)

Flags of the World, Part 3 (Cambodia to Czech Republic)

Flags of the World, Part 4 (Denmark to French Southern Territories)

Flags of the World, Part 5 (Gabon to Hungary)

Flags of the World, Part 6 (Iceland to Luxembourg)

Flags of the World, Part 7 (Macao City to Mynamar)

Flags of the World, Part 8 (Namibia to Nunavut, Canadian Territory

Flags of the World, Part 9 (Oman to Rwanda)

Flags of the World, Part 10 (Helena to Syria)

Flags of the World, Part 11 (Taiwan to Tuvalu)

Flags of the World, Part 12 (Uganda to Zimbabwe)

This entry is located in the following unit: Special Contents of Interest (page 3)
flight of ideas (s) (noun), flights of ideas (pl)
The quick skipping from one thought to another one even before the last one is finished: The flight of ideas have superficial relationships to one another and often are associated only by chance, as seen in the manic phases of manic depressive illnesses or in schizophrenias.
This entry is located in the following unit: idea, ideas (page 1)
flower of something
The flower of something usually refers to the best part or best example of something: "So many men were killed in the flower of their youth during the battle."
This entry is located in the following unit: flori-, flor-, flora-, -florous (page 5)
flux of energy, energy flux
A quantity measuring the rate of energy flow; the energy per unit time per unit area traveling across a surface element that is perpendicular to the energy flow.
This entry is located in the following unit: fluct-, flucti-, -flux, flu-, flum-, -fluent, -fluence (page 5)
fornicolumn, columna fornicis, column of fornix
1. A column or pillar of the fornix.
2. That part of the fornix that curves down in front of the thalamus and the interventricular foramen (slit-like passage ) of Monro, then continues through the hypothalamus to the mamillary body; consisting primarily of fibers originating in the hippocampus and subiculum (support or prop), the column of fornix is the direct continuation of the body of the fornix.
This entry is located in the following unit: fornic-, fornix- (page 1)
fornix of the stomach, fundus ventriculi
The portion of the stomach that lies above the cardiac notch or the area between the oesophagus and fundus (bottom or base) of the stomach.
This entry is located in the following unit: fornic-, fornix- (page 1)
fornix pharyngis, fornix of pharynx, vault of pharynx
The extreme upper part of the pharynx (the passage to the stomach and lungs; in the front part of the neck below the chin and above the collarbone).
This entry is located in the following unit: fornic-, fornix- (page 1)
fornix saccilacrimalis, fornix sacci lacrimalis, fornix of lacrimal sac
1. The extreme upper part of the lacrimal sac or either of the two dilated ends of the lacrimal ducts at the nasal ends of the eyes that fill with tears that are secreted by the lacrimal glands.
2. The dome-shaped upper junction of the lateral and medial walls of the lacrimal (tear) sac which is situated above the level of the opening of the lacrimal canaliculi or lacrimal canals.

Lacrimal canals are curved, tube shaped structures connected to the lacrimal puncta, that tears coming from the lacrimal lake drain into.

The lacrimal puncta are tiny openings towards the inner part of each eyelid, which the tears drain through.

The lacrimal lake is a small open area in each of the eyes where tears collect.

The superior (top) lacrimal canal is on the top and the inferior (lower) lacrimal canal is on the bottom and both lacrimal canals are located in the border of the each eyelid, near the area where the top and bottom eyelids come together.

Tears travel across the middle from the lacrimal canals to the lacrimal sacs and the lacrimal sacs are hollow spaces into which the lacrimal canals drain tears.

This entry is located in the following unit: fornic-, fornix- (page 1)
Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (noun) (no plural)
A compound word that refers to war, famine, pestilence or conquest, and death: The Four Horsemen are personified as the four major "plagues" or "evils" of mankind; which will come at the end of the world.

The Four Horsemen are used to describe people or other agents that can result in imminent catastrophe.

This entry is located in the following unit: calypto-, calypt- (page 2)
fracture of the humerus (s) (noun), fracture of the humeri (pl)
Physical injury that is sufficient to break the bone of the upper arm or forelimb that are forming joints at the shoulder and the elbow: If the fracture of the humerus is at the upper end, the arm is on a wire splint for about four weeks.

Usually movements of the fracture of the humerus at the elbow and wrist are started early, and active conditions of the shoulder will begin in about three weeks.

This entry is located in the following units: frag-, frang-, fract-, fring- (page 2) humero-, humer- (page 1) humus, hum- (page 1)
fraudulent concealment, suppression of evidence
1. The deliberate hiding, non-disclosure, or suppression of essential facts or circumstances that someone is legally or morally required to reveal; especially, with the intention to deceive or to defraud a person in a contractual arrangement.
2. Concealment, destruction or withholding of, or refusal to give, material evidence which a person has or knows and is legally or morally boung to reveal.

It is normally considered an '"obstruction of justice" which is a criminal offense.

3. A deliberate attempt to withhold information or to conceal an act to avoid a contractual responsibility.

Fraudulent concealment that is applied to health care providers comes up when a treating doctor conceals from an aggrieved patient that a previous treating doctor may have committed malpractice.

This entry is located in the following unit: ceal- + (page 1)
frenulum labii superioris, frenulum of superior lip
The prominent raised fold of mucous membrane connecting the inner surface of the upper lip with the upper gum in the median plane.
This entry is located in the following unit: fren- + (page 1)
frenulum of the lips, frenulum labialis oris
The fold or mucous membrane extending from the middle of the inner surface of the lip to the alveolar mucosa.

It is seen in both the upper and lower jaws.

This entry is located in the following unit: fren- + (page 1)
frenulum of the tongue
The frenulum that attaches the lower side of the tongue to the floor of the buccal (cheek) cavity.

At birth, this may be tight, a condition called "tongue-tie".

This entry is located in the following unit: fren- + (page 1)
Frey, James; Part 1 of 2
Memoir Authenticity is Challenged.
This entry is located in the following unit: Memoirs and Profiles Directory (page 1)
Frey, James; Part 2 of 2
Memoir Authenticity is Challenged.
This entry is located in the following unit: Memoirs and Profiles Directory (page 1)
front axle of a vehicle, steer axle
The most forward axle used for steering and the axle to which the front wheels are attached.
This entry is located in the following unit: front-, fronto- (page 2)
Fuel Cells: The Future Source of Fuel Operations?
This entry is located in the following unit: Information Technology (IT): Units Listed (page 1)
fulminate of mercury
A gray crystalline powder that when dry explodes under percussion or heat and is used in detonators and as a high explosive.
This entry is located in the following unit: fulg-; fulmi- (page 1)
fundus of the urinary bladder, fundus vesicae urinariae
The portion of the urinary bladder adjacent to the rectum.
This entry is located in the following units: fundu-, fundus-, fund-, found- + (page 2) vesico-, vesic- + (page 1)
fundus of the uterus, fundus uteri
The part of the uterus most remote from the cervix.
This entry is located in the following unit: fundu-, fundus-, fund-, found- + (page 2)
geographical cycle, geographic cycle; geomorphical cycle, geomorphic cycle, cycle of erosion
1. Theory was developed or formulated by the American geographer and geomorphologist, William Morris Davis (between 1884 and 1934), who modeled the formation of river-eroded landscapes.

This theory suggests that landscapes go through three stages of development (youth, maturity, and old age) and indicates that the rejuvenation of landscapes arises from tectonic uplift of the land.

In the "youthful stage", under the influence of tectonic uplifts, there appears a mountain relief, which is dissected through erosion (the washing out of rocks by rivers) into deep, narrow valleys and sharp-peaked ridges.

With the dissection by streams, the area would reach maturity and, ultimately, would be reduced to an old-age surface called a peneplain (gently undulating, almost featureless plain), with an elevation near sea level.

The model developed by Davis, though important in historical context, is currently considered only a first approximation.

Developments in the sciences of geology and geomorphology, especially the plate tectonics revolution of the 1960's and 1970's, have confirmed the preliminary nature of the model.

This entry is located in the following units: geo-, ge- + (page 11) grapho-, graph-, -graph, -graphy, -grapher, -graphia (page 37)
geographical distribution of resources, geographic distribution of resources
The physical character and distribution of natural resources on the face of the earth.

The fundamental differences between land and ocean, latitudinal differences in insulation, spatial variations in receipts of precipitation, and patterns of geological composition, and deformation of the earth's crust together provide the basis for distinguishing definite geographical patterns of resource availability through out the world.

This entry is located in the following units: geo-, ge- + (page 11) grapho-, graph-, -graph, -graphy, -grapher, -graphia (page 37)
geography of energy
The study of energy development, transportation, markets, or the use of patterns from a geographical perspective.
This entry is located in the following units: geo-, ge- + (page 11) grapho-, graph-, -graph, -graphy, -grapher, -graphia (page 38)
Global Positioning System (GPS): Index of Articles
GPS Index.
This entry is located in the following unit: Information Technology (IT): Units Listed (page 1)
God of sea, horses, and earthquakes.
Greek: Poseidon
Latin: Neptune

Symbols: Trident (three pronged spear), dolphins, and horses.

This entry is located in the following unit: gods and goddesses of the Olympic Council (page 1)
God of sun, music, poetry, and medicine.
Greek: Phoebus Apollo
Latin: Phoebus Apollo

Symbols: Lyre (musical instrument resembling a harp), arrows, and sun chariot.

This entry is located in the following units: gods and goddesses of the Olympic Council (page 1) musico-, music- + (page 1)
Grzimeks Encyclopedia of Mammals Volume 1

Monotremata (Egg-laying mammals); Marsupialia (Opossums, Marsupial mice, Bandicoots, Koalas, Wombats, Kangaroos); Insectivora (Solenodons, Tenrecs, Hedgehogs, Golden moles, Shrews, Moles); Chiroptera (Bats); Dermoptera (Flying lemurs).

Dr. Bernhard Grzimek; a famous zoologist; McGraw-Hill Publishing Company; New York; 1990.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 1)
Grzimeks Encyclopedia of Mammals Volume 2

Scandentia (Tree shrews), Primates (Prosimians, Monkeys, Apes, Humans)

Dr. Bernhard Grzimek; a famous zoologist; McGraw-Hill Publishing Company; New York; 1990.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 1)
Grzimeks Encyclopedia of Mammals Volume 3

Rodentia (Squirrels, Beavers, Mice, Dormice, Porcupines); Carnivora (Bears, Pandas, Viverrids, Hyenas, Cats)

Dr. Bernhard Grzimek; a famous zoologist; McGraw-Hill Publishing Company; New York; 1990.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 1)
Grzimeks Encyclopedia of Mammals Volume 4

Carnivora (Cats, Dogs, Seals, Sea lions); Lagomorpha (Rabbits, Hares, Pikas); Cetacea (Whales, Dolphins); Tubulidentata (Aardvarks); Proboscidea (Elephants); Sirenia (Sea cows); Hyracoidea (Hyaxes); Perissodactyla (Horses, Tapirs, Rhinoceroses)

Dr. Bernhard Grzimek; a famous zoologist; McGraw-Hill Publishing Company; New York; 1990.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 1)
Grzimeks Encyclopedia of Mammals Volume 5

Artiodactyla (Pigs, Peccaries, Hippopotamuses, Camels, Deer,Giraffes, Cattle, Goats, Sheep, Gazelles, Antelopes, Reindeer)

Dr. Bernhard Grzimek; a famous zoologist; McGraw-Hill Publishing Company; New York; 1990.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 1)
half a dozen of one and six of another
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 10)
Hermes, messenger of the Greek gods, who became Mercury, messenger of the Roman gods
See this Roman god, Mercury and his connections with the planets.
This entry is located in the following unit: herm-, herme- (page 1)
hernia of the brain
The protrusion of a portion of the brain through a defect in the skull.
This entry is located in the following unit: hernio-, herni- + (page 1)
hernia of the lungs
A rare, congenital anomaly associated with a fissured chest, in which a portion of the lung protrudes through the opening, the swelling enlarging with each expiration.
This entry is located in the following unit: hernio-, herni- + (page 1)
Hygiene, etymology of "health"
Greek Goddess [Hygeia, Hygea, Hygia, Hygieia], became the source of the word hygiene and health.
This entry is located in the following units: etym- (page 2) Health: Index of Articles (page 1) -ology, -logy, -ologist, -logist (page 37)
idea of reference (s) (noun), ideas of references (pl)
Delusions in which a person believes that anything that happens in the world has a specific meaning for her or him; or such a thing has been done only because of him or her: Even a thundering or drops of rain are considered ideas of references that are considered to be personal because someone feels these elements have a personal significance.

There are times when an idea of reference includes a delusion of persecution and the person misinterprets anything that happens in reality as a sign that there are imagined persecutors who are about to succeed in destroying or disgracing him or her.

James had an idea reference that convinced him that all remarks made by others were always about him, even when such comments had nothing to do with him.

This entry is located in the following unit: idea, ideas (page 1)
ideas of influence (s) (noun), ideas of influences (pl)
A clinical manifestation of certain psychotic disorders: A patient, for example Mike's neighbor Jane, has ideas of influences during which she experiences moments that she might believe that her thoughts are read by other people, that her limbs move without her consent, or that she is under the control of some external force.
This entry is located in the following unit: idea, ideas (page 1)
In filling out an application, where it says, "In case of emergency, notify..." I answered "a doctor".
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
in lieu of
In place of; instead of.
This entry is located in the following unit: loco- (page 2)
in spite of; not, inspite of (prepositional phrase)
Regardless of, even though; without being affected by: "The tourist had difficulty communicating when she went to Germany in spite of all the years she studied German."

"In spite of the high prices, there is still enough demand for oil to keep the costs of gas higher than some people can afford."

"Note that unlike 'despite' being spelled as one word, 'in spite' [of] should always be spelled as two separate words and not as 'inspite [of]'. Remember: inspite of, NO; in spite of, YES!"

in the vicinity of (s) (noun), in the vicinities of (pl)
1. The area near some particular place: Janet used to live in the vicinity of the Los Angeles Airport in California, but she moved because it was much too noisy!
2. Used before a number to indicate that an amount is not exact, but approximate: The current population of that city is in the vicinity of 10,000.
This entry is located in the following unit: vicini-, vicin- (page 1)
indirect measurement of electrolytes
The measurement of serum ions; such as, sodium, chloride, and potassium, which employs a sample diluted prior to analysis.

This method tends to result in errors in cases of hyperlipidemia or elevated concentrations of any or all of the lipids; such as, fatty, greasy, oily, and waxy compounds in the blood.

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 94)
intermittent claudication of the cauda equina, pseudoclaudication syndrome
Pain and paresthesia (abnormal skin sensations), often succeeded by sensory loss, motor weakness, and loss of the reflexes, arising in the motor and sensory distribution of lumbar or sacral roots after the patient has walked some distance.

The neurologic signs, which are sometimes minimal but are accentuated by walking, are those of a cauda equina syndrome or a dull pain in the lower back and upper buttock region, analgesia in the buttocks, genitalia (or thigh), accompanied by a disturbance of bowel and bladder function.

This entry is located in the following units: claudica-, claudic-, claud- + (page 1) inter-, intero- (page 10) pseudo-, pseud- (page 1)
invasion of privacy
1. The wrongful intrusion by individuals or the government into private affairs with which the public has no concern.
2. An encroachment upon the right to be left alone or to be free from publicity.
This entry is located in the following unit: privat-, priv- + (page 1)
irony of fate (s) (noun), irony of fates (pl)
A situation in which something happens that is very desirable in itself, but it is so badly timed that it isn't of any use or it is no longer an advantage: By an irony of fate, although Joseph had been living in poverty all of his life, he inherited a fortune; however, he was so old and incapacitated with an illness that he could not enjoy it.
This entry is located in the following unit: iron-, ironi- (page 1)
isthmus glandulae thyroideae, isthmus of thyroid
A narrow portion of the thyroid gland connecting the left and right lobes.
This entry is located in the following unit: isthm-, isthmo- + (page 1)
isthmus prostatae, isthmus of prostate
A band of fibromuscular tissue that joins the right to the left lobe of the prostate in front of the urethra.
This entry is located in the following unit: isthm-, isthmo- + (page 1)
katamorphism, zone of katamorphism
1. Metamorphism that occurs at or near the earth's surface where it breaks down complex minerals into simpler ones.
2. At or near the earth's surface or the outer zone of the solid earth in which the alterations of rocks result in the production of simple compounds from more complex ones.

It is subdivided into an "outer belt of weathering" and an "inner belt of cementation".

lateral meniscus of the knee (s) (noun), lateral menisci of the knees (pl)
Thickened crescent-shaped cartilage pads in the outer portions of the joints formed by the femurs (thigh bones) and the tibias (shin bones): Each lateral meniscus of the knee acts as a smooth surface for its coupling to move properly.

The lateral menisci of the knees are toward the outer sides of the knee couplings and they serve to evenly load the surfaces during the body's weight-bearing, and also aid in providing fluids for the lubrications of the contacting points.

This entry is located in the following unit: menisc-, menisco- (page 1)
Left bank: What the robber did when his bag was full of loot.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
let the cat out of the bag
To tell others about a secret: Jan's parents wanted to have a surprise party for his sister, but he let the cat out of the bag."
This entry is located in the following unit: cat, cats (page 1)
lots of ample parking
Advertisement heard on a radio: "Come on down! We have lots of ample parking!"
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 13)
malignant neoplasm of bone marrow (s) (noun), malignant neoplasms of bone marrows (pl)
The lymphocytes that produce antibodies which destroy bone tissue and cause overproduction of immunoglobulins: The malignant neoplasm of bone marrow leads to osteolytic lesions, hypercalcemia, anemia, renal damage, and increased susceptibility to infection.
This entry is located in the following unit: mal-, male-, mali- (page 5)
masticating apparatus, masticatory apparatus, stomatognathic system, masticatory system organs of mastication
All of the structures involved in mastication, including the teeth, jaws, temporomandibular joint (jaw joint formed by the mandible [lower jaw bone] moving against the temporal [temple and side] bone of the skull), muscles of mastication, tongue, and the associated nervous system.
This entry is located in the following unit: par-, para- (page 3)
matron of honor
A married woman acting as the chief attendant to a bride at a wedding.
This entry is located in the following units: lino-, lin-, line- (page 2) mater-, matri-, matro- matr- + (page 3)
mechanical equivalent of heat
1. Thermodynamics, in which a constant which expresses the number of units of heat in terms of a unit of work, typically expressed as the amount of heat transfer required to raise the temperature of one gram of water from 14.5 to 15.5 degrees centigrade.
2. The amount of mechanical energy equivalent to a unit of heat.
3. The number of units of work or energy equal to one unit of heat; such as, 4.1858 joules, which equals one small calorie.
This entry is located in the following unit: mechano-, mechan-; mechanico-; machin- (page 4)
mechanical theory of heat
The principle of heat which consists of motions of the particles that make up a substance.
This entry is located in the following unit: mechano-, mechan-; mechanico-; machin- (page 4)
medial meniscus of the knee (s) (noun), medial menisci of the knees (pl)
Compact, semicircular shaped cartilage (tough elastic tissue) cushions in the inner portions of the junctions formed by the thigh bones and the shin bones: The medial menisci of the knees are located in the inner sides of the knee connecters.

The medial menisci of the knees provide outer curves for conjoining links to move on, serve to evenly load the structures during walking, and aid in disbursing fluids to the joints for lubrication of those skeletal parts.

This entry is located in the following unit: menisc-, menisco- (page 1)
Memoir #2: Bob Martin; Memories of childhood
Memoir, Shards of a tyke, San Francisco, California, 1942-43.
This entry is located in the following unit: Memoir Directory: Bob Martin (page 1)
Messenger of the gods: Hermes, Mercury
Greek: Hermes (god)Mercury caduceus.
Latin: Mercury (god)

Messenger of the gods, god of commerce (trade) and thieves; also, the god of science, eloquence, cleverness, travel, and thievery.

Symbols: Winged cap, winged sandals, and a caduceus (a winged staff with two serpents twined around it, said to suggest intercourse) which some say should not be used to represent medicine or medical organizations.



Greek: Asclepius (god)Aesculapius with snake on staff.
Latin: Aesculapius (god)

The Aesculapius staff is considered to be the appropriate symbol of medicine, not the Mercury caduceus. The Hermes or Mercury symbol is incorrectly used by most U.S. medical organizations.




This entry is located in the following units: gods and goddesses from Greek and Latin Myths (page 2) herm-, herme- (page 2)
miasma theory of disease, miasmatic theory of disease (s) (nouns); miasma theories of diseases, miasmatic theories of diseases (pl)
An explanation of the origin of epidemics, based on the false notion that they were caused by air of bad quality; that is, emanating from rotting vegetation in marshes or swamps.

The miasmatic theory of disease apparently started in the Middle Ages and continued on into the mid 1800's, when it was used to explain the spread of cholera in London and in Paris, partly explaining Haussmann's latter renovation of the French capital.

Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann (March 27, 1809–January 11, 1891) was a French civic planner whose name is associated with the rebuilding of Paris. He was born in that city of a Protestant family from Alsace. The Haussmann Renovations, or Haussmannization of Paris was a work led under the initiative of Napoléon III and the Seine préfet, Haussmann, from 1852 to 1870.

The project encompassed all aspects of urban planning, both in the center of Paris and in the outside districts: streets and boulevards, regulations imposed on façades of buildings, public parks, sewers and water works, city facilities and public monuments.

The disease was said to be preventable by cleansing and scouring of the body and items. Dr. William Farr, the assistant commissioner for the 1851 London census, was an important supporter of the miasma theory. He believed that cholera was transmitted by air, and that there was a deadly concentration of "miasmata" near the Thames River banks.

Another proponent of the "miasmatic" theory was the renowned Crimean War nurse, Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), who was known for her work in making hospitals sanitary and fresh-smelling.

—Compiled from information located in Wikepedia.
This entry is located in the following unit: miasm-, miasma-, miasmat- (page 1)
modern colleges of today
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 14)
more than unique—it's practically one of a kind *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 14)
Mottoes, Slogans, Proverbs, Adages, Words of Wisdom: Latin and Greek to English Units
Units of Latin-Greek mottoes with English translations.
This entry is located in the following unit: Special Contents of Interest (page 3)
music of the spheres, harmony of the spheres
The natural harmonic tones supposedly produced by the movement of the celestial spheres or the bodies fixed in them.
This entry is located in the following units: musico-, music- + (page 1) sphero-, spher-, -sphere- (page 9)
Nanotechnology: Index of Articles
obsolete thing of the past *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 15)
olfactory region of nasal mucosa, region of olfactory mucosa
The specialized olfactory receptive area that includes the upper one-third of the nasal septum and the lateral wall above the superior concha and is lined with olfactory mucosa.
This entry is located in the following unit: olfacto-, olfact- + (page 2)
on the tip of one's tongue
Almost able to say something; at the point of being said: Jerry told his sister, "I have the word on the tip of my tongue."
This entry is located in the following unit: Tongue Idioms (page 1)
On the wall of a dentist's office: Alway be true to your teeth or they will be false to you.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 5)
osteoporosis of disuse
Osteoporosis or a decrease in bone mass that occurs with sedentary people or patients resulting from a lack of normal functional stress on the bones.

It may occur during a prolonged period of bed rest or as the result of being exposed to periods of weightlessness; for example, astronauts in outer space.

This entry is located in the following units: osteo-, oste-, ost- (page 6) poro-, por-, pori- + (page 1)
out of joint
1. Dislocated or painfully displaced.
2. Disturbed or disrupted, usually as a result of some major change or upheaval.
Pair of docs or two physicians
See paradox for this pun or play on words: Pair of docs
pair of twins *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 16)
papilla of the breast, nipple
1. The protuberance through which milk is drawn from the breast or mamma; the mammilla; a teat; a pap.
2. The orifice at which any animal liquid is discharged; such as, the oil from an oil bag.
3. Any small projection or article in which there is an orifice for discharging a fluid, or for other purposes; as, the nipple of a nursing bottle; or the nipple of a percussion lock.
This entry is located in the following unit: papillo-, papill-, papilli- + (page 1)
Paraffins: Those extensions found on the sides of fish.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 5)
pillar of strength (s) (noun), pillars of strength (pl)
Something, someone, or those who give support to or help during a difficult time or times: "William's church was his pillar of strength after his wife died."

"Mildred's friends were her pillars of strength when she was medically diagnosed as having incurable cancer."

This entry is located in the following unit: pil- (page 1)
Planning: The art of putting off until tomorrow what someone has no intention of doing today.
plebian, an alternative spelling of plebeian
1. Belonging to, or pertaining to, the common people.
2. A reference to, or belonging to, the ancient Roman plebs.
3. Common, commonplace, or vulgar; such as, a plebian or a plebeian joke.
This entry is located in the following units: -ian + (page 4) pleb- + (page 1)
Poem: The Cremation of Sam McGee by Robert Service
A poem that describes how Sam McGee finally found physical relief from his painful frigid condition.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Polygamy, Part 1 of 3
Get Polygamy, Part 1, for more information.
This entry is located in the following units: poly- (page 8) Polygamy Sections (page 1)
Polygamy, Part 2 of 3
Get Polygamy, Part 2, for more information.
This entry is located in the following units: poly- (page 8) Polygamy Sections (page 1)
Polygamy, Part 3 of 3
Get Polygamy, Part 3, for more information.
This entry is located in the following units: poly- (page 8) Polygamy Sections (page 1)
polyhedra; plural of polyhedron
A solid figure bounded by plane polygons or faces.
This entry is located in the following units: -hedral (page 1) poly- (page 9)
Posse Comitatus Act of 1878

The name Posse Comitatus means, “the Power of the County”, bringing to mind colorful images of the old west county sheriff swearing in a posse to pursue fleeing criminals.

The Act was born out of the extensive use of federal troops for law enforcement in the South following the Civil War. Congress, recognizing that the long-term use of the Army to enforce civilian laws posed a potential danger to the military’s subordination to civilian control, passed the Act.

The 1878 Posse Comitatus Act made it a crime for anyone to use the Army to enforce federal, state, or local civil laws.

The prohibitions of the Act are directed at preventing the military from becoming a national police force or Guardia Civil. Accordingly, the Act prohibits anyone from using the military to “execute the laws". Execution of the laws includes the arrest or detention of criminal suspects, search and seizure activities, restriction of civilian movement through the use of blockades or checkpoints, gathering of evidence, and certain uses of military personnel as undercover narcotics officers.

In essence, the closer the role of the military personnel comes to that of a police officer on the beat, the greater the likelihood that the Act is being violated.

Military Involvement During National Emergencies

The frequency with which the military has become involved in civilian law matters has varied throughout our history, typically reaching high points during times of national emergency. The difference in the 1990’s; however, has been to increase the routine use of the military in domestic law enforcement activities during a period of relative national calm and security.

Statutes and regulations enacted in the past decade permit the use of military personnel in drug interdiction, and immigration enforcement.

Although such involvement is supposed to be “indirect” under those statutes, the reality is that armed active duty military personnel are carrying out an enforcement activity that brings them into direct contact with criminal suspects.

The fact is that the political interest in stopping drug and alien smuggling is currently greater than the concern as to whether the military is being injected into a traditional civilian law enforcement role contrary to the principles upon which the Posse Comitatus Act was founded.

The military possesses unique training and equipment advantages in this arena that cannot be duplicated by civilian law enforcement. The fact that the National Guard is not subject to the Posse Comitatus Act while in its state status also provides a great deal of flexibility to planners for homeland defense.

National Guard Troops May Be Employed in Law Enforcement

National Guard troops may be actively employed in law enforcement activities in addition to their military specialty. While to the untrained eye the distinction between a BDU (Battle Dress Uniform) clad Army Reservist and a BDU clad National Guardsman may be nonexistent, the legal distinction between them is significant.

During a natural disaster Army reservists or Guardsman may both provide logistical aid such as water purification, medical assistance, and communications; however, due to the Posse Comitatus Act, it is only the Guardsman in his/her State status that can take an active role in suppressing looting and in providing general security for an area that has lost effective law enforcement control.

Constitutional Authority of the President Allows Utilization of Military to Preserve Civilian Laws

By virtue of the several statutory exceptions to the Posse Comitatus Act in the past decade, coupled with the general Constitutional authority of the President to preserve order, there are few areas of domestic law enforcement activity where the military is precluded from participating in times of national emergency or disaster.

While the Posse Comitatus Act still serves a valuable function in deterring a lower level commander or politician from engaging in unauthorized “police” activity using military forces, the Act today provides little hindrance to the National Command Authority in executing civilian laws in times of emergency through military personnel.

Through proper, legal declarations of Presidential emergency authority and/or through the use of National Guard assets in state status, it is increasingly likely that the military will play a significant enforcement role in response to domestic terrorism and other disasters for the foreseeable future.

—Compiled from information located in the following sources:
The Free Dictionary, Posse Comitatus Act ;
The Free Dictionary, Posse Comitatus (disambiguation);
Wikipedia, Posse Comitatus Act;
Wikipedia, Posse Comitatus, Common Law;
Encyclopedia Britannica; William Benton, Publisher;
Chicago; 1968; page 305.
pro-, a prefix used in front of a noun
In favor of or supporting something or someone; often used with a hyphen: A few examples of pro- include the following: pro-life, pro-American, pro-European, etc.
This entry is located in the following unit: pro-, por-, pur- (page 2)
production and interrelation of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's equations
Four equations, formulated by James Clerk Maxwell, that together form a complete description of the production and interrelation of electric and magnetic fields.

The statements of these four equations are as follows:

  1. Electric field diverges from electric charge.
  2. There are no isolated magnetic poles.
  3. Electric fields are produced by changing magnetic fields.
  4. Circulating magnetic fields are produced by changing electric fields and by electric currents.

Maxwell based his description of electromagnetic fields on these four statements.

prolapse of the iris (noun)
The protrusion of the iris through an injury in the cornea of the eye.
This entry is located in the following unit: laps-, lab- (page 2)
psychosis of senility (s) (noun), psychosis of senilities (pl)
Mental disorders which may be associated with becoming old: The psychoses of senility often involves the inability to deal with social situations or consists of behavioral disorders.

More severe psychosis of senilities may include confusion, memory failure, disorientation, restlessness, and speech disturbances.

This entry is located in the following unit: sen-, sene-, seni-, sir- (page 1)
Queen of the Eastern Archipel’ago
The island of Java.
This entry is located in the following unit: pelago-, pelag- (page 2)
Quotes: Signs of the Times
Signs that too often depict misinformation: signs of times quotes.
This entry is located in the following unit: Quotes: Quotations Units (page 6)
Radio Frequency Identification (RFID): Index of Units
This entry is located in the following unit: Information Technology (IT): Units Listed (page 2)
ramus of the mandible
1. One of the two prominent, projecting back parts of the horse-shoe-shaped lower jaw bone.
2. A quadrilateral process projecting upwards from the posterior part of either side of the mandible.
This entry is located in the following unit: rami-, ram- (page 2)
rarefaction of bone
The process by which bone becomes more porous because of absorption of mineral substances.

This may be caused by a disturbed calcium-phosphorus metabolism possibly resulting from excess parathyroid hormone.

This entry is located in the following unit: rar-, rare- + (page 1)
Reader's Digest of Man; The Last Two Million Years
The Reader's Digest Association, Inc.; Pleasantville, New York; 1973; page 64.
Readers Digest Joy of Nature

How to Observe and Appreciate the Great Outdoors; The Reader's Digest Association, Inc.; Pleasantville, New York / Montreal, Canada; 1977.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 1)
real flow of fluid
In physics, a flow that takes into consideration the energy lost by the flowing fluid through friction with the boundaries restricting its motion.
This entry is located in the following unit: real- (page 1)
Robot Origins and Characteristics of Robots
Originally from a Czech word robota, "force work", we now have robots and robotics, words which take us to manufactured devices that are capable of doing work ordinarily done by human beings.
This entry is located in the following unit: Robots and Robotics: A Directory or Index (page 1)
Robots and Robotics: Index of Units
This entry is located in the following unit: Information Technology (IT): Units Listed (page 2)
ruga gastrica, rugae of the stomach
Characteristic folds of the gastric mucosa; especially, evident when the stomach is contracted.
This entry is located in the following unit: rug-, rugo- + (page 1)
rugae of gallbladder, mucosal folds of the gallbladder
The interlacing folds of the mucosa that produce a honeycomb appearance in the interior of the gallbladder.
This entry is located in the following unit: rug-, rugo- + (page 1)
Rulers of the gods: Zeus, Jupiter; Hera, Juno
Greek: Zeus (god who replaced Cronus)
Latin: Jupiter (god also called Jove; replaced Saturn [father of Jupiter])

King of the gods and ruler of mankind.

Symbols: eagle, thunderbolts, and the oak.

Greek: Hera (goddess; also the goddess of women and marriage)
Latin: Juno (goddess; also the goddess of women and marriage)

The queen of the gods, wife of Jupiter (Greek); or Jove (Latin), and patroness of married women.

Symbols: the pomegranate, the peacock, and the cuckoo.

This entry is located in the following unit: gods and goddesses from Greek and Latin Myths (page 3)
sacculation of the colon, haustra of the colon
The sacculations of the colon, caused by the teniae, or longitudinal bands, which are slightly shorter than the gut so that the latter is thrown into tucks or pouches.
This entry is located in the following unit: sacco-, sacc-, sacci- + (page 1)
Sarchasm: the gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the recipient who doesn’t get it.
Selfish is what the owner of a seafood store does.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 5)
sense of balance, sense-of-balance
A sensory system is located in the structures of the inner ears which determines the orientation of the head or a condition of the bodily balance, maintained primarily by special receptors in the inner ear.

Sensory balance is the result of a number of body systems working together; specifically, in order to achieve balance the eyes (visual system), ears (vestibular system) and the body's sense of where it is in space (proprioception or the unconscious perception of movement and spatial orientation arising from stimuli within the body itself); all of which need to be intact and normally coordinated.

This entry is located in the following unit: libra-, liber-, libri- (page 2)
Shotgun wedding: A case of wife or death.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 5)
Shrews: A Variety of Shrew Species
Just a few of the many species of shrews with illustrations of these special creatures.
This entry is located in the following unit: Animal Index (page 1)
Skeleton: a bunch of bones with the person's body deleted.
slip of the tongue
The mistake of saying something that a person had not wanted or planned to say; an error of speech: Herb would not have known Shirley's secret if she had not made a slip of the tongue.
This entry is located in the following unit: Tongue Idioms (page 1)
soup du jour of the day
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 21)
sphere of attraction
1. The distance within which the potential energy arising from mutual attraction of two molecules is not negligible with respect to the molecules' average thermal energy at room temperature.
2. In physical chemistry, the area between two molecules within which the energy generated by their mutual attraction is significant enough to be distinguished from the average energy of other molecules in the system.
sphere of influence
An area of the world dominated politically or economically by a country, or certain countries.
sphere of reflection
In crystallography, a construction for considering conditions for diffraction in terms of the reciprocal rather than the real lattice.

It is a sphere with the incident beam along a diameter. The origin of the reciprocal lattice is positioned at the point where the incident beam emerges from the sphere.

Whenever a reciprocal lattice point touches the surface of the sphere, the conditions for a diffracted (or reflected) beam are satisfied.

This entry is located in the following unit: sphero-, spher-, -sphere- (page 12)
spheres of Eudoxus
A theory of Eudoxus from about 400 B.C.; a cosmological theory in which the planets, the sun, and the moon were described as being carried on a series of concentric spheres rotating within one another on different or various axes.

Eudoxus of Cnidus (about 408 B.C. to 347 B.C.) was a Greek astronomer and mathematician.

This entry is located in the following unit: sphero-, spher-, -sphere- (page 12)
spheroid, ellipsoid of revolution
1. A three-dimensional object that is shaped like a sphere, but is not perfectly round; such as, an ellipsoid or a geometric surface or a solid figure shaped like an oval.
2. Having a shape that is approximately spherical.
3. Any globular body, or one resembling a sphere.
4. An ellipsoid (a geometric surface or a solid figure shaped like an oval) generated by the rotation of an ellipse (a two-dimensional shape like a stretched circle with slightly longer flatter sides) around one of its axes or a straight line around which a geometric figure or a three-dimensional object is symmetrical.
This entry is located in the following units: -oid, -oidal, -oidism, -odic (page 19) sphero-, spher-, -sphere- (page 14)
tetralogy of Fallot
A congenital heart defect (a structural defect of the heart or great vessels or both that is present at birth, resulting from improper development of the heart and blood vessels during the prenatal period) consisting of four structural anomalies:
  • Obstruction to pulmonary flow.
  • Ventricular septal defect (abnormal opening between the right and left ventricles).
  • Dextroposition of the aorta (aortic opening overriding the septum and receiving blood from both ventricles).
  • Right ventricular hypertrophy (increase of volume of the myocardium, or the middle and thickest layer of the heart wall, composed of cardiac muscle of the right ventricle).

Infants with this condition are sometimes referred to as blue babies because cyanosis is an outstanding symptom, since the position of the aorta allows poorly oxygenated blood from the systemic circulation to mix with oxygenated blood from the lungs.

Other symptoms include clubbing of the ends of the fingers, hemoptysis, dyspnea on exertion, and a slight delay in growth and development.

This entry is located in the following unit: tetra-, tetr- (page 3)
The Birth of Writing
By Robert Claiborne and the Editors of Time-Life Books, Inc.; 1974; pages 79-83.
The Cambridge Illustrated Dictionary of Natural History

R.J. Lincoln and G.A. Boxshall; Cambridge University Press; Cambridge, England; 1987.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 2)
The Encyclopedia of Mammals
Edited by Dr. David Macdonald; Facts On File Publications; New York; 1985.

Planned and produced by Equinox (Oxford) Ltd.; Littlegate House; St. Ebbe's Street; Oxford, England.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 2)
The New Encyclopedia of Aquatic Life Volume One

Aquatic Invertebrates and Fishes; edited by Andrew Campbell and John Dawes; Facts on File Natural Science Library; Facts On File, Inc.; New York; printed in China; 2004.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 2)
The New Encyclopedia of Aquatic Life Volume Two

Aquatic Invertebrates and Fishes; edited by Andrew Campbell and John Dawes; Facts on File Natural Science Library; Facts On File, Inc.; New York; printed in China; 2004.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 2)
The Story of Writing
By Andrew Robinson; Thames and Hudson Ltd.; London; 1995; pages 7-217.
theater of the absurd (s) (noun), theaters of the absurd (pl)
1. Dramas stressing the irrational or illogical aspects of life, usually to show that modern life is pointless: The politician, Mr. Douglas, suggested that the latest election results were nothing more than a theater of the absurd.
2. A form of drama that emphasizes the absurdity of human existence by employing disjointed, repetitious, and meaningless dialogue, purposeless and confusing situations, and plots that lack realistic or logical procedures: Mrs. Willson, the drama teacher, told her students that the theater of the absurd, that they were expected to perform, should emphasize the main character's isolation in a bizarre and meaningless world.
This entry is located in the following units: surd-, -surd (page 1) theat-, theatr- (page 1)
theory of music, musical theory
In music, a discipline involving the construction of cognitive systems to be used as a tool for comprehending musical compositions.

The discipline is subdivided into what can be called speculative and analytic theory.

Speculative theory engages in reconciling with music certain philosophical observations of man and nature.

It can be prescriptive when it imposes these extramusical contentions to establish an aesthetic norm.

In more general usage, the term musical theory is used to include the study of acoustics, harmony, and ear training.

This entry is located in the following unit: musico-, music- + (page 3)
There are many women who spend a lot of scents on perfumes.
Playing with a different meaning for a word.
© ALL rights are reserved.

Go to this Word A Day Revisited Index
so you can see more Mickey Bach illustrations.

This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 6)
To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and then say that whatever you hit was the target you were aiming at.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 6)
Tomorrow: one of the greatest labor saving devices from the past, to the present, and for the future.
trichiasis of the anus
An incurvation of the hairs around the anus, consequently irritating the mucous membrane.
Tropic of Cancer
Tropic of Capricorn
1. The parallel of latitude 23° 27' south of the equator, the southern boundary of the Torrid Zone, and the most southerly latitude at which the sun can shine directly overhead (at the December solstice).
2. In astronomy, the Goat, a zodiacal constellation between Sagittarius and Aquarius.
uvula of the bladder (s) (noun) (no plural)
A slight projection into the cavity of the bladder, usually more prominent in older men: The uvula of the bladder is located just behind the urethral opening that marks the location of the middle lobe of the prostate gland.
This entry is located in the following unit: uvul-, uvulo- (page 1)
uvula of the soft palate (s) (noun); uvula of the soft palates (pl)
A conical protuberance from the back edge of the middle of the soft palate: The function of the uvula of the soft palate is to prevent food from entering the nasal cavity.

During swallowing, the uvula of the soft palate moves upward with the soft palate.

This entry is located in the following units: palato-, palat- + (page 3) uvul-, uvulo- (page 1)
Vaseball: a game of catch played by children in the living room.
venereal collar, collar of pearls, collar of Venus, leukoderma colli
Syphilitic leukoderma or a congenital skin condition characterized by spots or bands of unpigmented skin around the neck and shoulders.

It is virtually pathognomonic of late syphilis; that is, decisively characteristic of a disease or indicating a disease with certainty.

vestibular fossa, fossa of vestibule of vagina
The portion of the vestibule (passage) of the vagina between the frenulum of the labia minora (fold) connecting the two labia minora and the posterior labial commissure (slight fold uniting the lips majora posteriorly in front of the anus) of the vulva.
This entry is located in the following unit: foss-, fossili-, fossil-, fossor- + (page 2)
Vicar of Christ
In the Roman Catholic Church, the pope.
This entry is located in the following unit: vicar- + (page 1)
vidette, a variant spelling of vedette
1. A horse-mounted sentry posted in front of a military formation's position.
2. A small scouting boat used to observe and to report aboiut an opposing naval force.
This entry is located in the following unit: vid-, video-, vis-, -vision, -visional, -visionally, visuo-, vu- (page 14)
viva-voce, word-of-mouth
Expressed orally or with a living voice.
This entry is located in the following unit: viva-, vivi-, vivo-, viv- (page 5)
What's the definition of a will? It's a dead giveaway.
widow of the late (whoever is "late" [dead]) *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 24)
window of vulnerability (s) (noun); windows of vulnerability (pl)
A time frame within which defensive measures by the armed forces are reduced, compromised, or lacking: The window of vulnerability is used with reference to military defenses of strategic assets, and also by analogy in computer software to a "vulnerability" which is open to exploitation by hackers.
This entry is located in the following units: -ability (page 10) vulner- (page 2)
(shortened forms of spoken words or written symbols, or phrases, used chiefly in writing to represent the complete forms)
(generally a reference to indigenous people in general; being the first or earliest known of its kind present in a region: aboriginal forests, aboriginal rocks; of or relating to Aborigines or people of Australia)
(the origins and more recent usage as a term used in the performances of prestidigitation or "magic")
(modifying or describing parts of speech)
(descriptions of verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs)
(a system of sounds for each symbol)
(etymology of words or their original "true meanings"; a rich source of information regarding the earliest meanings of words as they migrated from the past into the present)
(the structure of organisms from the smallest components of cells to the biggest organs and their relationships to other organs especially of the human body)
(the science of bodily structures and parts as discovered and developed over the centuries by means of dissections)
(Egyptians suffered with a variety of physical complaints despite healthier habits among ancient nations)
(terms restricted to the study of social insects; such as, ants and words that apply generally to entomology)
(a glossary of archeological terms particularly related to the field of research that can tell us about our origins and our remote past)
(a published series of etymological topics)
(the science of the celestial bodies: the sun, the moon, and the planets; the stars and galaxies; and all of the other objects in the universe)
(scientific terms about the use of vehicles including cars, trucks, or any automobiles including their technology as related to transportation)
(a reverse acronym or a regular word that also doubles as an acronym using the same procedures as with acronyms, except that the letters of a word are presented to form a phrase which defines the word or for humorous reasons)
(a world of Biblical information for everyone who wants to know more about the Bible and its contents and the world from which it became known)
(phrases or Bible quotations that are derived directly from the King Jame's version of the Bible many of which are direct quotations)
(sources of information for the various terms listed in the Index of Scientific and Technological Topics)
(Algenol, an algae strain of microscopic plantlike organisms that feed off sunlight and carbon dioxide; a biofuel greener and cheaper than oil or corn-fed ethanol)
(a glossary of biological terms about living creatures including plants and all kinds of animal species and organisms)
(a collective term for all organic substances of relatively recent, non-geological, origin which can be used for energy production)
(many blended words have entered English since the 1800's; a significant number of which are corporate brand names)
(the relative locations of sections of the body, or bodily organs, and their actions and activities)
(what resembles an odd marriage between Trojan battle gear and Medusa is actually part of the most powerful brain scanner ever made)
(the most deadly five "enemies" of the brain: depression, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, stroke, and autism)
(words that end with cate and are pronounced KAYT)
(the hundred-degree temperature interval gave us the name scale of centigrade from the Latin centum, "hundred" and gradus, "step")
(Photo of world leaders at work)
(all of the enhanced units present parts of speeches (when applicable), have definitions for word entries, and clarifying sentences in context)
(some of the common terms used in computer science)
(a radiographic technique that produces an image of a detailed cross section of bodily tissue using a narrow collimated beam of x-rays that rotates in a full arc around a patient to image the body in cross-sectional slices)
(connecting words or groups of words)
(judicial or legal words that may apply to trial processes that determine the guilt or innocence of people which is ascertained by either judges or juries)
(lexicomedy, linguicomedy, or a chuckleglossary consisting of definitions which are markedly different from the accepted dictionary norm)
(a variety of learning concepts for improving vocabulary skills)
(a variety of diseases)
(New plagues, survival, and the various mutual adaptations carried on with our microbial fellow travelers)
(New diseases are always coming into existence, most change with time, and some even vanish from known existence!)
(Until recently, the usual explanation for the first pandemics was not biological but a result of immorality)
(dogs are considered to be the companions and best friends of humans and this list of terms will help all of us understand the topics that exist about our canine friends)
(a suffix that forms abstract and collective nouns added to adjectives to show state or condition; added to nouns to show a position, rank, or realm of; all of those who are part of a group or organization)
(conceptions of dreams from different cultures and during different historical periods)
(electricity has become one of the most significant areas of study in the world)
(concern over the environmental impact of burning fossil fuels has resulted in looking for alternative fuels that are less polluting)
(this summary of English history is continued from the Get Words home page)
(an official language of the Republic of South Africa which developed from the Dutch of the colonists who went there in the 1600's; South African Dutch)
(the language of a group of American Indian tribes that lived in the valleys of the Ottawa River and of the northern tributaries of the St. Lawrence River)
(an American Indian or an Eskimo; any of the languages of certain American Indians or Eskimos)
(A history of the English Language)
(languages spoken by over 400 closely related groups in central, east-central, and southern Africa, belonging to the South Central subgroup of the Niger-Congo language family and including Swahili, Kinyarwanda, Kirundi, Zulu, Xhosa, etc.)
(the language of France is also spoken in Belgium, Switzerland, Canada, Haiti, Monaco, New Caledonia, and several other countries including some areas of the U.S.; such as, Louisiana and some New England states)
(many words in English come from a variety of foreign sources)
(an alphabetized listing of links to a world of the uncompromising multi-purpose, majestic, and fathomable universe of words)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(an extensive list of words with explanations that can expand and greatly improve your English vocabulary)
(ecology is the study of the relationship between organisms and the environments in which they live, including all living and nonliving components)
(origins of "arena" and "clue")
(enhance your English vocabulary by taking advantage of word origins)
(Greek: eu, "good, well; sounding good" + pheme, "speaking, speech"; mild, agreeable, or roundabout words used in place of coarse, painful, or offensive ones)
(a history of English dictionaries)
(the historical progress of English dictionaries)
(the next stages of dictionary development)
(other features were incorporated into dictionaries as they continued to evolve)
(the laser that can produce quadrillions of pulses of light per second, creating a spot on a cell that is as hot as the sun)
(the first newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the second newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the third newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the fourth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the fifth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the sixth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the seventh newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the eighth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the ninth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the tenth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the eleventh newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the twelfth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the thirteenth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the fourteenth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(examples of how words can be applied in abnormal ways)
(the four gemstones which are most valuable are diamonds, sapphires, rubies, and emeralds; and anyone would be impressed with a gift of a diamond, a sapphire, an emerald, or a ruby piece of jewelry)
(geography includes mapmakers, scientists, explorers of the earth and provides a way to look at both the physical world and the people who live in various parts this globe)
(a glossary, or dictionary, of terms used in geology; the science of the earth including its origin, composition, structure, and history)
(when visiting old graveyards and examining the epitaphs on gravestones, there are certain words and phrases which could be difficult or impossible to understand without knowing what the words in this unit mean)
(medical professionals and scientists who specialize in designated areas of medical care)
(fields are protected by barriers of hedges by keeping the wind from eroding (blowing away) valuable top soil)
(Herodotus extended his historical coverage beyond the Greek world to the lives, ways, and beliefs of the people with whom the Greeks and the Persians came into contact)
(the science of water which denotes the study of the properties, distribution, and movements of water on land surfaces, in the soil, and through the subsurface rocks of the earth)
(a description in which plants can be produced in containers filled with water and a number of other non-soil contents)
(Latin punctus "a point" or "a mark"; the standardized non-alphabetical symbols or marks that are used to organize writing into clauses, phrases, and sentences, and in this way to clarify meanings)
(access a variety of topics regarding science and technology)
(this is an over-all listing of the special groups of topics listed on this site)
(Historical perspectives of the Reader's Digest)
(a compilation of excerpts and quotes from past issues of magazines and books so they won't be lost in the present)
(There are estimated to be 10,000 million insects living in each square kilometer of habitable land on earth or 26,000 million per square mile)
(Latin origins of words in English characterized by "jumping, leaping", or "springing forward")
(a glossary of terms relating to the decoration and design of interior spaces in buildings)
(Italian developed from Latin and the following words came into English from Italian; most of which were derived from Latin)
(the first Latin words to find their way into the English language owe their adoption to the early contact between the Roman and the Germanic tribes on the European continent and Greek came with Latin and French while others were borrowed directly; especially, in the fields of science and technology)
(Modern Medical Technology reveals more about King Tut, Part 1 of 2)
(Modern Medical Technology reveals more about King Tut, Part 2 of 2)
(just a few of the many important words with several applications in common practice and referring to special technical and scientific operations)
(mathematics is the deductive study of quantities, magnitudes, and shapes as determined by the use of numbers and symbols while every branch of science and engineering depends on mathematics; measurement is the process of associating numbers with physical quantities and phenomena and measurement is fundamental to the sciences; to engineering, construction, and other technical fields; and to almost all everyday activities)
(how some terms might be interpreted by those who lack professional vocabulary knowledge in the field of medicine)
(leeches are bleeding their way back into the good graces of modern medical treatment as healers just as they did in ancient societies)
(learning more about the progress of medicine throughout the centuries)
(fashion terms including the invention of new words for items that apply specifically to men's fashions)
(terms about the science and technology of metals and metal processing)
(topics about the study of the complex motions and interactions of the atmosphere, including the observation of phenomena; such as, temperature, density, winds, clouds, and precipitation)
(an index of Mickey Bach cartoons)
(composed of varied things or made up of many different things or kinds of things that have no necessary connection with each other; from Latin miscellaneus, from miscellus, "mixed"; and derived from miscere, "to mix")
(words that don't mean what they look like or what many people assume that they should mean)
(the advantages of self determination in fulfilling your objectives and belief in your aspirations can improve your mental control and enhance your health)
(these words have become a part of the English language over recent years)
(previously published list of Focusing on Words Newsletters)
(names of words)
(Old Norse: oaf, silly person)
(the study of the deep seas or oceans involves the abyss or the "deep seas" which cover almost two-thirds of the earth's surface; showing applicable scientific terminology in this unit)
(grammatical forms including: nouns, adjectives, adverbs, verbs, etc. that are used to identify word entries)
(a science that attempts to discover the fundamental principles of the sciences, the arts, and the world that the sciences and arts influence)
(generally, flowering plants have special parts that make it possible for them to exist)
(poetic, figures of speech, and words primarily referring to the content of various types of poems)
(words to live by, to inspire, and to give guidance)
(words that take the places of nouns)
(using the creations of pumpkins to illustrate some words)
(this page includes a presentation of the punctuation marks or symbols that are in general use in English writing)
(a mark of punctuation for questions)
(symbols at the beginning and end of a word or groups of words)
(some quotes about a variety of subjects)
(over the past century, knowledge of the way the universe works [science] has grown significantly, and with it the ability to apply that knowledge to everyday problems [technology] has changed the way people live)
(the spread of information with the "wiring" of the world has improved communications between people and accelerated the pace of scientific discoveries as well as greater efficiency in the exchange of technical knowledge and applications)
(a re-writing of the classical story with excessive wordiness)
(there is much more to learn about the mysterious processes of sleep and the things that disturb it)
(bibliographic sources of information from which words and topics have been compiled about scientific and technological topics)
(bibliographic sources of information from which words and sentences have been compiled about words and expressions English speakers should know for better understanding and communication)
(a comparison of synonymous references and their relationships to each other)
(engineering is the technical science in which properties of matter and the sources of power in nature are made useful to people; such as, in structures, devices, machines, and products)
(some of the common terms and abbreviations used by those who send out text messages)
(a translation of the story)
(The name given to the plague that ravaged Europe between 1347 and 1351.)
(The name given to the plague that ravaged Europe between 1347 and 1351.)
(The name given to the plague that ravaged Europe between 1347 and 1351.)
(Various living organisms are organized from the smallest unit of cells to form tissues which form organs and organs work together to form organ systems)
(Fiction or Non-Fiction? You decide.)
(theater as we know it was originated by the Greeks and many of their theatrical terms are still in use)
(historical perspectives of thermoscopes to thermometers: Daniel Fahrenheit, Galileo Galilei, Anders Celsius, and Lord Kelvin; among others, were major contributors to temperature calculations as we know them today)
(Sesquipedalia Verba or Sesquipedalians are references to the use of excessively long words)
(A family of words ending in -ude.)
(knowledge about special topics that enhance a person's understanding about certain words)
(to make a careful and critical examination of something or to investigate someone thoroughly)
(A visual presentation of various plants, animals, insects and other forms of life in their environments)
(as presented by Mickey Bach, the cartoonist who defined words with related illustrations)
(using definitions and a letter added to the beginning of the second word of two words with the same spellings will produce two completely different words)
(sentences that illustrate the manipulations of words with one meaning into different applications)
(words exist in all sizes and degrees of difficulty from numerous languages and English continues to churn out new words from the past and the present)
(many of the words used today in English are derived from Greek myths)
(an exhibition of words that appear in headlines and sub-headlines which all of us should know)
(lists of words used in context from various printed media; including, statements that help readers determine how words function in various contents)
(there are many words which may be rarely seen by a vast number of people; however, they have been existing and they are still available for one's use or enlightenment)
(a collection of English words that have been used in the titles of articles from various printed media)
(one of the group of biological sciences, each of which deals with an aspect of the study of living things)
(phyla rhymes or major taxonomic groups, classifying of living organisms, into which animals are divided and made up of several classes in poetic format)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “of
“Lawyer Idiocy” as Demonstrated by Some of Them

On November 8, 1998, there was an article in “Dear Ann Landers” titled, “Lawyer-bashing: Sometimes wounds are self-inflicted.”

The Massachusetts Bar Association Lawyers Journal printed the following questions actually asked of witnesses by lawyers during a trial. The responses to some of the questions were given by insightful witnesses. This is not a put-on. It’s for real. —Ronita in Center Line, Michigan”

  • Question: Now, doctor, isn’t it true that when a person dies in his sleep, he doesn’t know about it until the next morning?
  • Question: The youngest son, the twenty-year-old, how old is he?
  • Question: Were you present when your picture was taken?
  • Question: Was it you or your younger brother who was killed in the war?
  • Question: Did he kill you?
  • Question: How far apart were the vehicles at the time of the collision?
  • Question: You were there until the time you left, is that true?
  • Question: She had three children, right?

    Answer: Yes.

    Question: How many were boys?

    Answer: None.

    Question: How many were girls?

  • Question: You say the stairs went down to the basement?

    Answer: Yes.

    Question: And these stairs, did they go up, also?

  • Question: How was your first marriage terminated?

    Answer: By death.

    Question: And by whose death was it terminated?

  • Question: Can you describe the individual?

    Answer: He was about medium height and had a beard.

    Question: Was this a male or a female?

  • Question: Is your appearance here this morning pursuant to a deposition notice that I sent to your attorney?

    Answer: No, this is how I dress when I go to work.

  • Question: Doctor, how many autopsies have you performed on dead people?

    Answer: All my autopsies are performed on dead people.

  • Question: All your responses must be oral. OK? What school did you go to?

    Answer: Oral.

  • Question: Do you recall the time that you examined the body?

    Answer: The autopsy started around 8:30 p.m.

    Question: And Mr. Dennington was dead at the time?

    Answer: No, he was sitting on the table wondering why I was doing an autopsy.

  • Question: Mr. Slatery, you went on a rather elaborate honeymoon, didn't you?

    Answer: I went to Europe, sir.

    Question: And you took your new wife?

  • Question: So the date of conception was August 8th?>

    Answer: Yes.

    Question: And what were you doing at the time?

  • Question: Are you qualified to give a urine sample?

    Answer: I have been since early childhood.

  • Question: You were not shot in the fracas?

    Answer: No, I was shot midway between the fracas and the navel.


Oh, well! That's the way it goes sometimes.


This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #05 (page 1)
2. Scientific method, formlation of physical laws and generalizations
The formulation of physical laws from the generalization of the phenomena: physical laws are the way nature usually behaves based on what has been observed in the past.
This entry is located in the following unit: Measurements and Mathematics Terms (page 1)
3. Scientific method, developoment of theory to predict new phenomena
The development of a theory that is used to predict new phenomena where the theory is a general statement that explains the facts.

A theory can lead to a new conclusion or the discovery of a phenomenon. Developments of a theory often result in a change in paradigm; that is, looking at or thinking about a scientific problem in a totally different way as indicated by a set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitute a way of viewing reality for the scientific community that shares them.

—Based on information compiled from "Why Is Measurement Important to Science?"
by Patricia Barnes-Svarney, Editorial Director; The New York Public Library Science Desk Reference;
A Stoneson Press Book, Macmillan Publishers; New York; 1995; page 2.
This entry is located in the following unit: Measurements and Mathematics Terms (page 1)
A message from someone who recently purchased a copy of Words for a Modern Age, A Cross Reference of Latin and Greek Combining Elements

John Robertson:

I received your book on 6/26/00. Congratulations on a great book. You no doubt spent a great amount of time in research. I find the book fascinating.

It’s been over 45 years since I studied Latin and Greek in college and unless one keeps it up, one tends to forget. You have rekindled my interest. Now that I’m retired, I’ll have more time. I have always been interested in the origin of words especially from Latin and Greek.

Because the schools do not teach Latin and Greek as they once did, your book would be invaluable in helping students with the English language; thereby enriching their thought process. I am so happy that we still have people in this world who regard knowledge of Latin and Greek essential to scholarly development.

To quote Seneca, Jr. from your book: “Non scholae, sed vitae discimus.” Thank you for your “illusions” and also many thanks to your wife.

Jeffrey

Note from your editor: The “illusions” referred to the dedication in Words for a Modern Age, A Cross Reference of Latin and Greek Combining Elements in which I wrote: “Dedicated to my wife, who has been my sine qua non. She has kept me in good health with her loving concern for my well being and has rarely interfered with my efforts to strive for my ‘illusions.’ ”

The Latin quotation by Seneca, Jr. means: “We don’t learn just for school, but we learn for life.”.




Speaking of books. The following came from "The Spelling Newsletter" published by Ray Laurita, Leonardo Press, PO Box 1326, Camden, ME 04843.


Can This Be True? Department

After reading the following exchange which appeared in the Metropolitan Diary, I have a feeling that our readers will be equally dismayed:

Carol Ruth Langer stopped at the information desk of a Barnes & Noble in Midtown to inquire about a copy of the Book of Job.


"How would you be spelling 'Job'?" the clerk asked.

"J -- O -- B", Ms. Langer said.

"Job books are in the career section."

Ms. Langer tried again. "Not job, Job, a book in the Bible".

"Who is the author" the clerk asked.


At that point, Ms. Langer knew it was time to leave.


As seen in the May 15, 2000, issue of the New York Times.
This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #11 (page 1)
ABA Model Code of Professional Responsibility
American Bar Association standards of behavior, which are voluntary and intended as self-regulating for lawyer conduct in the courtroom and between lawyers and clients.
This entry is located in the following unit: Criminal Court Words or Judicial Terms + (page 1)
aberration of starlight
1. The tiny apparent displacement of stars resulting from the motion of the earth through space.
2. Apparent displacement of a star from its true position, due to the combined effects of the speed of light and the speed of the earth in orbit around the sun (about 30 kilometers per second or 18.5 miles per second).
This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 1)
Academic Press Dictionary of Science and Technology
Edited by Christopher Morris; Academic Press, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Publishers; New York; 1992.
This entry is located in the following unit: Sources of Information; Science and Technology (page 1)
acceptance of responsibility
A genuine admission or acknowledgment of wrong doing.

In federal presentence investigation reports, for example, convicted offenders may write an explanation and apology for the crime(s) they committed

A provision that may be considered in deciding whether leniency should be extended to offenders during the sentencing phase of their processing.

This entry is located in the following unit: Criminal Court Words or Judicial Terms + (page 1)
adaptive theory of sleeping
A theory that the sleep pattern of human beings developed after the species began living in caves, which offered protection from encounters with powerful night time predators.
This entry is located in the following unit: Dream Terms (page 1)
Administrative Office of United States Courts
Organization that hires federal probation officers to supervise federal offenders.

Also supervises pretrial divertees; probation officers prepare presentence investigation reports about offenders at the request of a district judge.

This entry is located in the following unit: Criminal Court Words or Judicial Terms + (page 1)
Aesculepius, Asculapius (Latin); Asclepius, Asklepios (Greek), Part 1 of 2
A god for all medical doctors unit.
age of majority, age of consent
Chronological date when one reaches adulthood, usually either 18 or 21; when juveniles are no longer under the jurisdiction of the juvenile courts, but rather the criminal courts.
This entry is located in the following unit: Criminal Court Words or Judicial Terms + (page 2)
allocation of resources
The knowledge people use to assign rights to the ownership and use of resources.
alternation of generations
Succession of sexually and asexually formed groups of offspring belinging to a given species of organisms; such as, microspheric and megalospheric foraminifers, polyps, and medusa stages of some coelenterates (invertebrate lacking a backbone or spinal column), etc.

Coelenterates are radially symmetrical animals having saclike bodies with only one opening and tentacles with stinging structures; they occur in polyp and medusa forms.

This entry is located in the following unit: Geology or Related Geological Terms + (page 2)
Amazing Histories of Words

Lists of word histories including a wide variety of well-known English terms.

This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 1)
amble of dogs
A relaxed, easy gait in which the legs on either side move almost, but not quite, as a pair.

Often seen as the transition movement between a walk and other gaits.

This entry is located in the following unit: Dog or Canine Terms + (page 1)
angle of incidence
The angle that a ray of sun makes with a line perpendicular to the surface.

A surface that directly faces the sun has a solar angle of incidence of zero, but if the surface is parallel to the sun (for example, sunrise striking a horizontal rooftop), the angle of incidence is 90°.

This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 1)
angle of response
A natural surface inclination of a slope consisting of loose, well-sorted rock or mineral fragments.
This entry is located in the following unit: Geography Terms + (page 1)
ant sizes of workers: monomorphic, dimorphic, polymorphic
Depending on the species, workers in a colony can be
  1. Monomorphic, all the same size.
  2. Dimorphic, of two sizes.
  3. Polymorphic, more than two sizes.

Workers divide labor, so some leave the nest to find food while most of them stay in the nest to take care of all of the other tasks which need to be done.

This entry is located in the following unit: Ant and Related Entomology Terms (page 2)
Apollo, god of the Sun, words from myths
The Sun god who brings life-giving heat and light to Earth unit.
Apple of your eye (Deuteronomy 32:10, Zechariah 2:8)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 1)
Arena: Blood, Sweat, and Cheers; Part 1 of 2
Latin: harena, "sand" or "arena" in English, became the general term for "shows" and now it refers more to "sports", etc. unit.
Asimov's Chronology of science and Discovery
Isaac Asimov; Harper & Row, Publishers; New York; 1989.
This entry is located in the following unit: Sources of Information; Science and Technology (page 1)
astronomical areas of study
Fields of study include: astrophysics, celestial mechanics, and cosmology.

Astronomy is considered by some to be the oldest recorded science. This concept is based on records from ancient Babylonia, China, Egypt, and Mexico.

The first true astronomers are said to be the Greeks, who deduced the earth to be a sphere and attempted to measure its size. A summary of Greek astronomy came to us from Ptolemy of Alexandria's Almagest.

The Arabs developed the astrolabe and produced good star catalogs while in 1543, the Polish astronomer Copernicus demonstrated that the sun, not the earth, is the center of our planetary system

The Italian scientist Galileo was the first to use a telescope for astronomical study, 1609-1610.

The British astronomer William Herschel's suggestions on the shape of our galaxy were verified in 1923 by the U.S. astronomer Edwin Hubble's telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory in California.

Recent extension of the powers of astronomy to explore the universe has been made possible in the use of rockets, satellites, space stations, and space probes, while the launching of the Hubble Space Telescope into permanent orbit in 1990 has made it possible for the detection of celestial phenomena seven times more distant than by any earth-based telescope.

This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 3)
balance of payments
A periodic summary of difference between a nation's total payments to foreign countries and its receipts from them.
This entry is located in the following unit: Economical, Business, and Financial Terms + (page 2)
balance of system
Represents all components and costs other than the photovoltaic modules/array.

It includes design costs, land, site preparation, system installation, support structures, power conditioning, operation and maintenance costs, indirect storage, and related costs.

This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 2)
balance of trade
The difference in value between a nation's imports and its exports.
This entry is located in the following unit: Economical, Business, and Financial Terms + (page 2)
Baptism of fire (Matthew 3:11)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 1)
Best of Breed
The dog selected by the judge as the best representative of a particular breed on that day.
This entry is located in the following unit: Dog or Canine Terms + (page 2)
Bibliography or Sources of Terms
Bibliography of topics and terms.
This entry is located in the following unit: Index of Scientific and Technological Topics (page 1)
Bibliography or Sources of Terms
Some of the references used to present topics and terms.
This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 1)
Bill of Rights
The first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution which set forth certain freedoms and guarantees to U.S. citizens.
Biometrics: Index of Units
Units which explain the various aspects of biometrics unit.
Biomimetics: Index of Natural Imitations
The production of natural-life mimics unit.
birth of Egyptology
The study of ancient Egypt can be traced to Napoleon's 1798 invasion, when his team of scholars and artists made detailed records of the country's antiquities.
This entry is located in the following unit: Archeology, Archaeology (page 2)
Birth of the Blues

This is supposed to be the ONLY time Johnny Carson sang in public!

This show was at Kiel Opera House in St Louis, in June, 1965, when Johnny Carson hosted the "Tonight Show".

"The Rat Pack" was playing in Las Vegas, but visited Carson for this entertaining performance by Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., and Johnny Carson

Click on this link: Birth of the Blues for your enjoyment.

This entry is located in the following unit: Videos (page 1)
Blog, Blogs, and Blogging, Part 1 of 2
A Blog is Another Way to Express Our Selves When Writing on the Internet unit.
burden of proof
The requirement to introduce evidence to prove an alleged fact or set of facts.
This entry is located in the following unit: Criminal Court Words or Judicial Terms + (page 6)
By the skin of your teeth (Job 19:20)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 1)
By the sweat of your brow (Genesis 3:19)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 1)
Calendar,The Whole Ball of Wax
The meaning and origin as presented in this unit.
Cameron defends stiff sentences for rioters, honing debate on message of deterrence
stiff sentences:
rioters:
honing:
deterrence:

"Mr. Cameron said the four days of arson, riot and looting in London and major cities was 'absolutely appalling' and the criminal justice system should be sending 'a very clear message that it's wrong and won't be tolerated.' "

International Herald Tribune, August 18, 2011; page 3.
Capnomania and Fumimania, Part 1 of 4
The Ballad of Salvation Bill by Robert W. Service and additional capnomania-fumimania information about smoking or addiction to tobacco smoke from the past to the present unit.
Capnophobia and Fumiphobia, Part 1 of 4
The fear and hatred of tobacco smoke or being around smokers and being exposed to smoking in general unit.
cate family of verbs
Words that end with cate and are pronounced KAYT: in this unit.
center of gravity
The point where the weight of an object appears to be concentrated, usually near its middle.

Cars with a high center of gravity are more likely to topple over when they go round corners.

This entry is located in the following unit: Automobile or Related Car Terms (page 2)
challenges of jurors
Questions raised of jurors by the judge, prosecutor, and/or defense attorney relating to their qualifications as impartial finders of fact; a determination of juror bias one way or another for or against the defendant.
This entry is located in the following unit: Criminal Court Words or Judicial Terms + (page 7)
change of venue
A change in the place of trial, usually from one country or district to another one.

Changes of venue are often conducted to avoid prejudicial trial proceedings, where it is believed that a fair trial cannot be obtained in the specific jurisdiction where the crime was alleged to have been committed.

This entry is located in the following unit: Criminal Court Words or Judicial Terms + (page 7)
Chariots of Fire (2 Kings 6:17)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 2)
Chemical Elements Chart History, Part 1 of 2
History of the Chemical Elements Table unit.
Chemical Elements Chart History, Part 1 of 2
History of the Chemical Elements Table unit.
cleavage of lateral epitaxial films for transfer; CLEFT
A process for making inexpensive Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) photovoltaic cells in which a thin film of GaAs is grown on top of a thick, single-crystal GaAs (or other suitable material) substrate and then is cleaved from the substrate and incorporated into a cell, allowing the substrate to be reused to grow more thin-film GaAs.

This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 4)
coefficient of relationship, coefficient of relatedness, degree of relatedness
The probability that a gene possessed by one individual is also possessed by another individual through common descent in the previous few generations.
This entry is located in the following unit: Ant and Related Entomology Terms (page 5)
Cognition or Processes of Sensory Input Terms
Cognition Theory and Applications by Stephen K. Reed; Thomson Learning, Inc.: 2004.
This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography or Lists of Glossary-Term Sources (page 1)
Confusing Words, Index of Clarified Groups A-Z
Lists of homonyms, homophones, homographs, and other words that cause confusions unit.
crumple zones of cars
Crumple zones exist at the front and the back of a car and these areas are deliberately designed to crumple up like an accordion when a collision takes place.

Such actions slow the car's deceleration and dramatically reduces the impact forces. Just three feet (one meter) of crumpled car can cut the forces reaching the passengers by 90 percent.

This entry is located in the following unit: Automobile or Related Car Terms (page 2)
curvature of space
According to Einstein's theory of gravitation, massive objects in space; such as, stars, cause space to curve and light to bend.
This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 8)
days of storage
The number of consecutive days the stand-alone system will meet a defined load without solar energy input.

This term is related to system availability.

This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 5)
depth of discharge; DOD
The ampere-hours removed from a fully charged cell or battery, expressed as a percentage of rated capacity.

For example, the removal of 25 ampere-hours from a fully charged 100 ampere-hours rated cell results in a 25 percent depth of discharge.

Under certain conditions, such as discharge rates lower than that used to rate the cell, depth of discharge can exceed 100 percent.

This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 6)
Dictionary with a Touch of Humor
Enjoying words with special points of view, sometimes humorous, and which are not found in a "regular" dictionary unit.
Early flaws of euro are resurfacing in debt crisis
flaws:
resurfacing:
debt crisis :

When the rules for the euro were first drafted 15 years ago, the leaders of France and Germany had to compromise even to agree on its name: Berlin wanted a 'a stability pact,' emphasizing Germanic fiscal discipline, while the French leaders insisted on adding 'growth' to the title to make it more palatable to their voters."

International Herald Tribune, August 18, 2011; page 1.
Education: Index of Topics
Various topics having to do with technological education and research trends unit.
elbow of a dog
The joint in the front leg where the upper arm (humerus) meets the forearm (ulna).
This entry is located in the following unit: Dog or Canine Terms + (page 4)
Encyclopedia of Science and Technology
James Trefil, General Editor; Routledge; New York; 2001.
This entry is located in the following unit: Sources of Information; Science and Technology (page 1)
Energy Sources of Words
Scientific research into scientific Energy Sources of Words.
This entry is located in the following unit: Index of Scientific and Technological Topics (page 1)
Erin McKean presents a speech titled: "The Joy of Lexicography"
Filmed at TED: Technology, Entertainment and Design, March, 2007.

Click on this link: Erin McKean was able to launch Wordnik, thanks to her TED Talk.

This entry is located in the following unit: Videos (page 1)
Examples of Conjunctions
  • Either write her a note or call her on the phone. (connecting verbs)
  • That tree is quite tall but full of leaves. (connecting adjectives)
  • The setup at the table is missing a knife and a fork. (connecting nouns)
This entry is located in the following unit: conjunction (s), conjunctions (pl) (page 1)
expansion of universe
A feature of our universe deduced from the observation that the distant galaxies' light is red-shifted.

Observations so far have not succeeded in determining whether the universe is open (of infinite extent in space) or closed (of finite extent) and whether the universe in the future will continue to expand indefinitely or will eventually collapse back into an extremely dense, congested state.

This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 10)
Fat of the land (Genesis 45:18)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 2)
Feet of clay (Daniel 2:31-33)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 2)
First Point of Aries
The point at which the sun, traveling from south to north on the ecliptic, crosses the celestial equator.

Identical to the vernal equinox.

This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 11)
Funk & Wagnalls Standard Handbook of Synonyms, Antonyms, and Prepositions
By James C. Fernald, L.H.D.; Funk & Wagnalls; New York; 1947.
This entry is located in the following unit: Sources of Information; Words in Action (page 1)
Grammatical Forms That Are Used to Identify the Parts of Speech for Word Entries
A list of Parts of Speech that are presented with word entries.
This entry is located in the following unit: Index of Punctuation Marks (page 1)
Graveyard Words for a Greater Understanding of Epitaphs

Lists of words used on old gravestones which used Latin terms.

This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 1)
Hydroponics: Soilless Production of Crops
The Soilless Production of Crops or Hydroponics elements.

This entry is located in the following unit: Index of Scientific and Technological Topics (page 2)
In the twinkling of an eye (1 Corinthians 15:52)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 3)
Index of Information from Past Publications Revealed in the Present, Part 1
Information from the Past and into the Present, Part 1; Historical perspectives of the Reader's Digest.
Index of Information from Past Publications Revealed in the Present, Part 2
Information from the Past and into the Present, Part 2; Excerpts of humorous and more serious topics from the Reader's Digest March, 1932.
Index of Information from Past Publications Revealed in the Present, Part 3
Information from the Past and into the Present, Part 3; A few words from the Reader's Digest July, 1940.
Index of Scientific and Technological Topics

Lists of scientific and technological subjects for your investigation and enlightenment or education that results in understanding and the spread of knowledge.

This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 1)
Instructions for Use of Commercial Products

These statements were found on actual products. Really! Why? Is it ignorance on the part of companies or is this something out of “Instructions for Dummies?” Not all of them are blunders in English.

The warning labels are real because some companies are afraid of being abused by frivolous lawsuits that U.S. courts should be throwing out without further consideration. Instead, it is costing consumers millions of dollars because companies are actually required by law to pay large sums for nonsense lawsuits and, of course, these costs are passed on to those who buy their products.

Robert Dorigo Jones, president of the Michigan Lawsuit Abuse Watch, a consumer advocacy group says, "Wacky warning labels are a sign of our lawsuit-happy times."

  • On hairdryer instructions: Do not use while sleeping.
  • On a bag of Fritos: You could be a winner! No purchase necessary. Details inside.
  • On a bar of Dial soap: Directions. Use like regular soap.
  • Frozen dinner that says: Serving suggestion, Defrost.
  • On a hotel-provided shower cap in a box: Fits one head.
  • On Tesco's Tiramisu dessert: Do not turn upside down. (Printed on the bottom of the box)
  • On Marks & Spencer bread pudding: Product will be hot after heating.
  • On packaging for a Rowenta iron: Do not iron clothes on body.
  • On Boots (pharmacy chain in the UK) children's cough medicine: Do not drive car or operate machinery after use.
  • On Nytol: Warning, may cause drowsiness.
  • On a Korean kitchen knife: Warning, keep out of children.
  • On a string of Chinese-made Christmas lights: For indoor or outdoor use only.
  • On a Japanese food processor: Not to be used for the other use.
  • On Sainsbury's peanuts: Warning, contains nuts.
  • On an American Airlines packet of nuts: Instructions, open packet, eat nuts.
  • On a Swedish chainsaw: Do not attempt to stop chain with your hands.
  • Contributed by Doron, As seen in Joke of the Day! Date: Tue, 27 Oct 1998.

  • Label on a baby stroller (British, "pram"): Remove your child before folding the stroller for storage.
  • A Batman costume carried a warning stating: "PARENT: Please exercise caution. FOR PLAY ONLY. Mask and chest plate are not protective. Cape does not enable user to fly.
  • A plastic sled advises users to wear helmets and to avoid trees, rocks, or "man-made obstacles."

    It also states: "This product does not have brakes."

  • Addicted to Milk? A self-described milk-a-holic is suing the dairy industry, claiming that a lifetime of drinking whole milk contributed to his clogged arteries and a minor stroke. Norman Mayo, 61, believes he might have avoided his health problems if he had been warned on milk cartons about fat and cholesterol.

    "I drank milk like some people drink beer or water," he said. "I've always loved a nice cold glass of milk, and I've drank [sic] a lot of it."

    The Associated Press, 6/6/97.

  • Milk Lawsuit - Featured in Jay Leno's "Tonight Show" [a Talk-Show Host and comedian on American T-V].

    As Jay Leno noted in his monologue on June 10, 1997, "Here's another reason why Americans hate lawyers. A man in suburban Seattle is suing the dairy industry because he's become addicted to milk and it has raised his cholesterol to dangerous levels. It's just as dangerous as tobacco. The government should have warning labels on milk, in fact this is the proposed warning label:

    WARNING: TOO MUCH MILK CAN MAKE YOU A FRIVOLOUS-LAWSUIT FILING MORON.

  • This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #04 (page 1)
International System of Units, SI; Système Internationale d’Unités
All systems of weights and measures, metric and non-metric, are linked through a network of international agreements supporting the International System of Units.

The International System is called the SI, using the first two initials of its French name Système International d'Unités.

The primary agreement is the "Treaty of the Meter" or the Convention du Mètre, signed in Paris on May 20, 1875.

Forty-eight nations have signed the treaty, including all the major industrialized countries. The United States is a charter member of the metric club, having signed the original document back in 1875.

Each SI unit is represented by a symbol, not an abbreviation. The use of unit symbols is regulated by precise rules.

These symbols are the same in every language of the world; however, the names of the units themselves vary in spelling according to national procedures; therefore, it is correct for Americans to write meter and Germans to write Meter, and it is also correct for the British to write metre, Italians to write metro, and Poles to write metr.

There is no official spelling of the SI units; however, the SI does provide the names, the definitions, and the symbols of the units which must be followed even when the spellings are different as shown below.

The fundamental SI unit of length has numerous spellings

  • meter (American English, Danish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Norwegian, Slovak, and Swedish)
  • metr (Czech, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • metras (Lithuanian)
  • metre (British, Australian, Canadian and New Zealand English; French)
  • metri (Finnish)
  • metro (Basque, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish)

A list of elements associated with the International System of Units (SI)

  • ampere (unit of measurement)
  • are (unit of area measurement)
  • atomic second
  • candela (cd) (SI unit of measurement)
  • centimeter (cm) (unit of measurement)
  • coulomb (unit of energy measurement)
  • farad (unit of measurement)
  • gram (gm or g) (measurement)
  • hectare (unit of measurement)
  • henry (unit of energy measurement)
  • hertz (unit of measurement)
  • joule (unit of energy measurement)
  • kelvin (K) (unit of measurement)
  • kilogram (kg) (unit of measurement)
  • kilometer (km) (unit of measurement)
  • liter (l) (unit of measurement)
  • lumen (unit of energy measurement)
  • lux (unit of energy measurement)
  • megohm (electronics)
  • meter (m) (measurement)
  • metric ton (unit of weight)
  • micrometer (unit of measurement)
  • millimeter (mm) (unit of measurement)
  • mole (chemistry)
  • nanometer (unit of measurement)
  • nanotesla (physics)
  • newton (unit of measurement)
  • ohm (unit of energy measurement)
  • pascal (Pa ) (unit of energy measurement)
  • second (unit of time)
  • siemens (S) (unit of energy measurement)
  • tesla (unit of energy measurement)
  • unit (measurement)
  • volt (unit of measurement)
  • watt (unit of measurement)
  • weber (unit of measurement)

Compiled partly from information located at the
Encyclopedia Britannica on line.
This entry is located in the following unit: Measurements and Mathematics Terms (page 7)
intrinsic rate of increase
Symbolized by r, the fraction by which a population is growing in each instant of time.
This entry is located in the following unit: Ant and Related Entomology Terms (page 10)
Labor of love (Hebrews 6:10)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 3)
Land of Nod (Genesis 4:16)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 3)
Letter of the law (2 Corinthians 3:6)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 3)
Letters of interest from readers
John,

I mentioned this earlier but my letter apparently went into hyperorbit. The phrases involving two and tandem are not pleonasms. Tandem hitching simply requires that the hitching of a team be linear, one behind another. Any number of individuals can constitute the tandem team.

A replacement pleonasm could be the “three-horse troika.” A troika is three horses, hitched abreast, to a conveyance.

—-Richard

This is in reference to my pleonasm/redundancy list at the pleonasm page.


For the history [of discipline and punishment], I found the following on www.m-w.com:

Discipline Etymology: Middle English, from Old French & Latin; Old French, from Latin disciplina, teaching, learning, from discipulus, pupil.

Punish Etymology: Middle English, punisshen, from Middle French, puniss-, stem of punir, from Latin punire, from poena, penalty —

My interpretation is that discipline is an inflexible teaching. Punishment can be a tool to achieve discipline, but reward is another tool. Moreover, crime punishment (for example) can be hardly related with discipline.

—Giovanni

Hello,

I am very delighted with the newsletter. I agree that the female version of an android would be gynoid or something in that area. I have recently learned the Ancient Greek word for woman: gune, gunaikos. So in English that would transliterate into gyna-.

I was wondering how I can get my comments to appear on the newsletter. I truly love the classic languages and anxious to participate.


Si bene valet, valeo.
—Michael

Contrasting Discipline and Punishment

Discipline is derived from the Latin word discere which means to learn. Discipline is related to the concept of moral or physical training often involving hard work and hard knocks as we say “I went to the school of hard knocks.” We learn from the mistakes we make (except for those of us with hard heads!).

Discipline can be imposed by others or we can be self-disciplined. We learn discipline (self-control) through the lessons of life.

Many times, when we behave in an undisciplined matter we can incur a consequence which is like a penalty or punishment.

Penalties for our behavior can be a natural result of our actions or given to us by our authority.

Punishment comes from two Latin words; the Latin verb punire (poenio) which means to punish or penalize and the Latin noun poenia = a penalty/punishment. It is the idea of paying for the wrong that was done. Hence the Latin idiom poenas dare, "to pay the penalty".

Punishment is related to discipline but not synonymous.

As language evolves, related terms are sometimes used interchangeably as are discipline and punishment. However, I believe it is best to clearly distinguish between these two terms as your text book is doing. Looking at the phrases below, which communicates more clearly?

I am being punished. [I am experiencing a penalty] I am being disciplined. [Am I behaving in a disciplined manner or being punished?]

He endured the discipline. [Did he endure rigorous training or a punishment?] He endured the punishment. [He endured a penalty].

For what it's worth,

—Lori

Just wanted to say thank you for a wonderful and educational site on the WWW. I work with a lot of people from other countries who, have asked me to help them learn the English language. This site has been extremely helpful to me.

With all of the slang that is used, it is hard to understand, some of which I was not aware of, that I have been using (like "what's up" a man from Ethiopia said to me what is the meaning of this Laura? What do they mean what is up? The sky is up, I laughed and explained).

Anyway, thanks for teaching me as well and others. Bless you for the effort you put forth!


—Laura

Gee, I really like this site. I prepare prison inmates to pass the GED exam. I really like my work and am planning on presenting a 40-minute talk with handouts about the value of improving vocabulary. This will be in March at the Missouri Department of Corrections Education Conference.

I should have two sessions, with about thirty to forty participants each. The title of my little dittie is: "Don't Be a Brain Robber, Be a Brain Builder!" Catchie-huh?

Now, I would like to know if I may use some of the material from this site and if you have some references or pearls of wisdom to suggest. I really would appreciate hearing them.

By the way, in the field of literacy and emerging language skills, the area of corrections is doing a big job of stressing the importance of getting a GED. If an inmate wants a job above $7.50 a month, he has to have a diploma!

Sometime in the next two years, an inmate will also need a GED to get a parole date! So far I have enjoyed my inmate students. They are so interesting, and surprisingly, they are open to using dictionaries and improving their vocabulary. Thanks for listening.

—Sincerely, Nancy

Hi John

Thank you for the welcome; what fun to find your page. As a retired teacher of Humanities, I applaud the writer's efforts to present accurate information to her class. I'm sure she is an excellent teacher. I also admire your effort in trying to focus on Latin and Greek derivatives, and I'll be interested to see if you can pull it off.

Having done no research on either punishment or discipline, I don't have any answers, but here are a few ideas I'll S.W.A.G.

First, punishment and discipline are Latin derivatives but with radically different stems. The text is right to make a difference between them. The Latins and Greeks were clear thinkers and, therefore, meant exactly what they said.

When they used "punishment," they meant a condition of causing pain or suffering; when they used "discipline," they meant instruction and/or education. Punishment and discipline may be used together. That is, one may cause pain or suffering (emotional, not necessarily physical), but that is largely ineffective without discipline.

"Don't hit your sister with your fist, you'll break your knuckles" is more effective than "Don't hit your sister with your fist, because if you do, I"ll hit you." ;-)

So, discipline takes punishment one step further; it provides instruction as to the way of the world. Experiments in child psychology appear to provide evidence showing that babies only two or three months old have a sense of how the physical world works. The essence of punishment is unpredictability. The two words probably became synonymous in the vernacular through sloppy thinking.

Good luck with your project.

—Best regards, Gayle

Any idea who came up with this ridiculous sesquipedalian monstrosity [floccinaucinihilipilification]? I forgot the definition.

Your newsletter is great by the way.

Ok, is there a precise word for the act of "counting sheep" other than the inaccurate "insomnia"? If not, can we offer a neologism, a hybrid word combining sheep and sleep . . . Ewesomia? But that isn't pc, is it? Ewes it or lose it . . . . (to sheep perchance to dream?)

I checked Nelson's Expository Dictionary of the Old Testament in which the word for "flock, sheep, goats"; is tso’n or "small cattle". "Tso’nia?" "Tso’nasomia"? I don't know, this sounds strange . . . .

What about the "counting" part of "counting sheep"? The same Hebraic dictionary defines "count"; as saphar, meaning "to number, count, proclaim or declare".

So counting sheep could be combined into "Saphartsonia"?

But what about the "sleep" connection? This is rambling, perhaps you could offer a Latin-Greek variant . . . thanks.

—John M.
This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #03 (page 1)
Living off the fat of the land (Genesis 45:18)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 3)
marvels of the Maya
In 1839, Frederick Catherwood and John Lloyd Stephens explored Central America, visiting the Maya monuments of Copan, Palenque, and Uxmal. Stephens' fascination with the Maya has continued to these modern times.
This entry is located in the following unit: Archeology, Archaeology (page 5)
McGraw-Hill Year Book of Science & Technology
McGraw-Hill, Inc.; New York; 1992.
This entry is located in the following unit: Sources of Information; Science and Technology (page 1)
Misleading Meanings of English Words

English words that don't mean what they look like as they are often assumed to be.

This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 2)
Nanotechnology: Index of Articles
A series of nanotech subjects unit.
O ye of little faith (Luke 12:28)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 4)
Oaf of Office
Oaf or Oath of Office?
This entry is located in the following unit: Words at Work in the Print Media: INDEX (page 1)
oil of amber
Brown essential oil distilled from amber.

It is miscible (mixable) with alcohol which has a balsamic (aromatic resin) aroma.

This entry is located in the following unit: amber (page 1)
Out of the mouths of babes (Psalms 8:2, Matthew 21:16)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 4)
Poetry, Proverbs, Quotes, and Statements of Faith

Compositions, both secular and of a religious nature, providing thoughts about faith and personal meditations for consideration.

This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 2)
Results of Previous "Mnemonic devices can guarantee greater accuracy in spelling English words.

First, the results of the principal/principle survey

The spelling of many English words are confusing even to those whose first language is English.

There were 45 per cent of the subscribers on the Focusing on Words Newsletter list who responded to the survey.

  • 1. The (principal/principle) reason for this discussion is to improve one’s spelling skills.

    Of those responding, 68 per cent chose the right answer (principal).

  • 2. All of us should live by certain moral (principals/principles).

    Ninety-nine per cent chose the right answer (principles) in number two.

  • 3. The (principal/principle) character in the play is ill.

    In number three, eighty-two per cent chose the right answer (principal).

  • 4. His political (principals/principles) are less than acceptable.

    In number four, ninety-seven per cent chose the right answer (principles).

  • 5. As a matter of (principal/principle), he refused to borrow money from anyone.

    In number five, ninety-seven per cent chose the right answer (principle).

  • 6. The (principal/principle) invested in that project was $100,000.

    Of those participating, eighty-five per cent made the correct choice of (principal) in number six.

  • 7. We must instill into the minds of our youth (principals/principles) of honesty and morality.

    Ninety-seven per cent of participants indicated the right answer (principles) in the last number.

A few words about the use of mnemonic devices that make it easier to remember how to spell certain words correctly.

Although many subscribers had different mnemonic devices for determining which principal/principle to use in a sentence, the best mnemonics to use seem to be “main” for principal and “rule” for principle.

Note the relationship of the “a” in main and principal and the “le” in rule and principle. Always make these relationships and you will always use them correctly.

Mnemonic [nee MAH nik], as in mnemonic device, comes from the Greek element that means, “memory” or “to remember” and refers to a technique that facilitates making the right choices for words that are otherwise confusing.

Whenever you want to make sure you have chosen the correct principal/principle, substitute the words main and rule in place of one or the other principal/principle, to see if it makes sense and when it does; it is certain that you have the right choice. For example, in number one, you could say, “The rule reason for this discussion ....” or say, “The main reason for this discussion ....” and you would logically have to choose main or “principal” because the other choice simply doesn’t make any sense.

So many people have used the mnemonic device of saying, “You spell the principal of the school with pal because he/she is your pal” or something similar to that. I strongly urge that you NOT use this mnemonic because it can be very misleading. It tends to make people think that the use of pal is used only with that particular principal. It is far better to say that the principal of the school is spelled with pal because he/she is the MAIN administrator, teacher, or educator of the school.

Did you notice the erratum in sentence number seven of the survey. Mea culpa. I used “install” instead of “instill into the minds ....”

Congratulations to nine subscribers (out of the 412 who participated) who saw and told me about this error (erratum). If there had been more than one erratum, then I would have had to confess to errata.

Thank you, if you were one of those who contributed to the survey. It was amazing to see that MOST of the participants made no errata in their submissions. I apparently have a VERY knowledgeable list of subscribers!

This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #05 (page 1)
sands of time
Showing the sands of time.

Word Info image © ALL rights reserved.
This entry is located in the following unit: Time, Times, and More Times (page 1)
Scientific Terms Including a Variety of Topics
  1. Descriptioinary by Marc McCutcheon: Checkmark Books; An imprint of Facts On File, Inc.; New York; 2000.
  2. Encyclopedia of Science and Technology by James Trefil, Editor; Routledge; New York; 2001.
  3. How Things Work, Everyday Technology Explained by John Langone; National Geographic; Washington, D.C.; 2006.
  4. Inventions and Discoveries by Rodney Carlisle; Scientific American; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; Hoboken, New Jersey; 2004.
  5. Random House Word Menu by Stephen Glazier; Random House Publishers; New York; 1992.
  6. Science Desk Reference; Scientific American; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; New York; 1999.
  7. The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy by E.D. Hirsch, Jr., Joseph F. Kett, and James Trefil; Houghton Mifflin Company; Boston, Massachusetts; 1988.
This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography or Lists of Glossary-Term Sources (page 1)
seasonal depth of discharge
An adjustment factor used in some system sizing procedures which "allows" the battery to be gradually discharged over a 30-90 day period of poor solar insolation.

This factor results in a slightly smaller photovoltaic array.

This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 19)
shelf life of batteries
The length of time, under specified conditions, that a battery can be stored so that it keeps its guaranteed capacity.
This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 19)
Sign of the times (Matthew 16:3)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 4)
state-of-charge; SOC
The available capacity remaining in the battery, expressed as a percentage of the rated capacity.
This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 20)
Sweat of your brow (Genesis 3:19)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 4)
The ends of the earth (Zechariah 9:10)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 4)
The love of money is the root of all evil (Timothy 6:10)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)
The results of a diagnostic test given to premedical students who were instructed to write short meanings for a list of medical terms

artery, the study of paintings.

bacteria, the back door of a cafeteria.

barium, what doctors do when patients die.

bowel, a letter like a, e, i, o, or u.

caesarean section, a neighborhood in Rome.

cat scan, searching for a lost cat.

cauterize, making eye-contact with a girl.

coma, a punctuation mark.

dilate, to live a long time.

enema, not a friend .

euthanasia, Chinese, Japanese, etc. adolescents.

fester, quicker.

fibula, a small lie.

genital, not a Jew.

hangnail, a coat hook.

impotent, distinguished, well known.

labor pain, getting hurt at work.

malfeasance, exorbitant charges for professional services.

medical staff, a doctor’s cane.

morbid, a higher offer.

nitrates, cheaper than day rates.

node, was aware of, knew.

nosography

1. The art of writing using a pen or pencil stuck up one’s nose.

2. The writing done by a nasograph.

outpatient, someone who has fainted.

pap smear, a fatherhood test.

pelvis, a cousin of Elvis.

prophylactic, a person who favors birth control.

recovery room, place to do upholstery.

rectum, dang near killed ‘em.

secretion, hiding something.

seizure, famous Roman leader.

tablet, a small table.

terminal illness, getting sick at the airport.

tumor, more than one.

urine, opposite of “you’re out”.

vein, conceited.

—Source is unknown
The root of the matter (Job 19:28)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)
The salt of the earth (Matthew 5:13)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)
Think of any single number greater than zero; such as, 1 to 9.
Multiply the number of your choice by 3. Add 1. Multiply by 3. Add the original number to the result.

The answer will always end with 3. Delete the 3, and the remaining figure will be the original number that you started with.

This entry is located in the following unit: Number Challenges (page 1)
torrent of (s) (noun phrase), torrents of (pl)
A violent, sudden, and excessive outpouring of something; usually, words or feelings: Ingrid experienced a torrent of abusive words from her supervisor because she didn't get her report in on time.
This entry is located in the following unit: English Words in Action, Group T (page 4)
tragedy of the commons
The degradation of commonly owned resources due to the lack of incentive for individual users to conserve them.

Commons were originally shared grazing areas, which were generally overgrazed. The full expression was coined by Garrett Hardin in 1968.

This entry is located in the following unit: Ocean and Deep Sea Terms (page 6)
Vexillology Information, Part 1 of 4
The study of flags and their significance; in this unit.
Wages of sin (Romans 6:23)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)
wanderers or positions of planets
The orbits and positions of the planets or "wanderers" could not be accurately accounted for before the invention of the telescope although star positions were known.

Understanding came with the revolutionary work of Galileo, Brahe, and Kepler which, together with Newton's contributions, finally swept away the Greek concept of an earth-centered universe and established the present model of the solar system.

The Greeks had simplified celestial mechanics according to the simple doctrine that "matter behaves according to nature."

This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 28)
Wash your hands of the matter (Matthew 27:24)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)
Words of Science and the History behind Them
Isaac Asimov; Houghton Mifflin Company; Boston; 1959.
This entry is located in the following unit: Sources of Information; Science and Technology (page 1)
Words Used in Headings as Seen in a Variety of Publications

Lists of groups about Words Used in Printed Media Headings as seen in various media publications.

This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 2)
writ of certiorari
A writ issued by a higher court directing a lower court to prepare the record of a case and to send it to the higher court for review.

It is a means of accessing the U.S. Supreme Court in order for a case to be heard.

This entry is located in the following unit: Criminal Court Words or Judicial Terms + (page 7)
zodiac, revision of star signs

"The Sun does not move", wrote Leonardo da Vinci in 1495

Well, everything in the Cosmos moves, including the sun, the earth and the Star Signs of the Zodiac. The Signs of the Zodiac were first mapped by the ancient Babylonians about 3,000 years ago when, indeed, there were 12 Star Signs.

Movement on the Cosmic time-scale is very slow compared with the time-scale of a human life. The Star Signs are slipping by a small amount each year, so that there are now 13 Signs in the Zodiac.

The Sign of Ophiuchus (30 November-17 December) moved into the Zodiac over 1,000 years ago. Most astrologers continued to use the traditional 12 Signs of the Zodiac because they were unaware of star movements. That practice has continued to the present day.

To illustrate just how slowly the Cosmic clock advances: the Age of Pisces replaced the Age of Aries about 1,400 years ago, and the much-heralded Age of Aquarius will not be here for another 600 years!

The New Signs of the Zodiac

  1. The New Pisces: First Sign of the Zodiac: 12 March to 18 April.
  2. The New Aries: Second Sign of the Zodiac: 19 April to 13 May.
  3. The New Taurus: Third Sign of the Zodiac: 14 May to 20 June.
  4. The New Gemini: Fourth Sign of the Zodiac: 21 June to 19 July.
  5. The New Cancer: Fifth Sign of the Zodiac: 20 July to 19 August.
  6. The New Leo: Sixth Sign of the Zodiac: 20 August to 15 September.
  7. The New Virgo: Seventh Sign of the Zodiac: 16 September to 30 October.
  8. The New Libra: Eighth Sign of the Zodiac: 31 October to 22 November.
  9. The New Scorpio: Ninth Sign of the Zodiac: 23 to 29 November.
  10. The New Ophiuchus: Tenth Sign of the Zodiac: 30 November to 17 December.
  11. The New Sagittarius: Eleventh Sign of the Zodiac: 18 December to 18 January.
  12. The New Capricorn: Twelfth Sign of the Zodiac: 19 January to 15 February.
  13. The New Aquarius: Thirteenth Sign of the Zodiac: 16 February to 11 March.
—Information for these zodiac signs came from the book:
The 13 Signs of the Zodiac by Walter Berg;
Thorsons, an Imprint of Harper Collins Publishers;
San Francisco, California; 1995; pages viii, and 1-127.
This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 28)