You searched for: “is
verb "to be": am, is, are; was, were; will be; has been, have been; had been; being (verb forms)
To exist: "He will be here later."
This entry is located in the following unit: verbo-, verb-, verbi- (page 3)
(Latin: belly, venter [the use of "stomach" is considered incorrect for this root word]; from Latin abdo-, to put away)
(Greek > Latin: suffix; from French -aque, or directly from Latin -acus, from Greek -akos forming adjectives. This suffix was used to form names of arts and sciences in Greek and it is now generally used to form new names of sciences in English; meanings, "related to, of the nature of, pertaining to, referring to")
(Latin: prefix; to, toward, a direction toward, addition to, near, at; and changes to: ac-, af-, ag-, al-, an-, ap-, aq-, ar-, as-, at- when ad- is combined with certain words that begin with the letters c, f, g, l, n, p, q, r, s, and t)
(the state of being enslaved to a habit or practice or to something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming, as narcotics, to such an extent that its cessation causes severe trauma)
(two separate units where one is dealing with phobias and the other one presents manias)
(this is a pictionary of lions from African countries)
(Latin: ring, an iron ring for the feet; circle; (so called because of its form); usually the posterior opening of the alimentary canal through which undigested food is voided; the anus)
(Latin: a suffix forming adjectives from nouns ending in -ary; a person who, a thing that; a person who is a part of something, pertaining to one's state or condition; a person who has a connection with or belief in the stated subject; a promotor of something; a native or inhabitant of someplace; someone of a certain age)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; a place for; abounding in or connected with something; a place containing or related to that which is specified by the root)
(Greek: shield; one who is armed with a shield)
(Latin: something that is inferior, small, or shallow; expressing incomplete resemblance)
(Latin: bile; which is a digestive juice secreted by the liver, stored in the gallbladder, and aids in the digestion of fats)
(a bionic hand which is considered a next-generation prosthetic device which appeals to both patients and health care professionals)
(Greek: mucus; a slippery protective secretion that is produced in the linings of some organs of the body by the mucous membranes and glands)
(A Blog is Another Way to Express Our Selves When Writing on the Internet)
(A Blog is Another Way to Express Our Selves When Writing on the Internet)
(more and better sterilization of body parts is essential to successful body transplants)
(November is the 11th month of the New Style Calendar)
(Greek: smoke; vapor; sooty [extended meaning is carbon dioxide])
(This suffix has no etymological source; it is just a part of other words.)
(Latin: unmarried; vow not to marry; chaste, morally pure in thought and conduct; that which is considered to be decent and virtuous behavior)
(cytology is the study of cells and the cell theory states that all living things are composed of cells and that all cells arise only from other cells)
(Latin: brain; that part of the brain that is concerned with the coordination of body movements)
(Greek: chemical element; antimonos, opposed to solitude; symbol Sb is from Latin stibium [powdered antimony]; some say antimony means, “a metal seldom found alone”; metal)
(Anglo-Saxon: gold, Sanskrit juel, to shine; the symbol is from Latin aurum, shining down; metal)
(Anglo-Saxon: iron, the symbol is from Latin ferrum which also means iron; metal)
(Anglo-Saxon: lead; the symbol is from the Latin plumbum, "lead")
(Latin: named for the Roman god Mercurius; the symbol is from Latin hydrargyrum, "liquid silver"; liquid metal)
(Modern Latin: named for the goddess, Niobe, daughter of Tantalus. This element is also known as columbium; metal)
(Modern Latin: named for potash, a compound of potassium; the symbol is from Latin kalium; from Arabic, gilf, and a reference to the charred ashes of the saltwort; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Anglo-Saxon, sealfor, siolfur; the symbol is from Latin argentum, "silver"; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Swedish, tung sten, "heavy stone"; the symbol is from German Wolfram;, named for the tungsten mineral wolframite; metal)
(Greek: choledochos, from chole, "bile" + dechomai, "to receive"; the common bile duct or tube; conveying bile; containing bile, which is a yellow-green fluid that is made by the liver, stored in the gallbladder, and passes through the common bile duct into the first section of the small intestine or duodenum where it helps to digest fat)
(Greek: dance; involuntary movements; spasm; in medicine, it is used to reveal a nervous disorder either of organic origin or from an infection)
(Greek (khylos) > Latin (chylus): juice, to pour; pertaining to chyle, the milky fluid consisting of lymph and emulsified fat that is a product of the digestive process)
(Greek: glue; used in the sense of "pertaining to a colloid, a gelatinous [gluelike] substance in which particle matter is suspended")
(Greek: crowlike; used in the specialized sense of "pertaining to, or connected to the coracoid, the bony process that forms part of the scapular arch [and is so named because its shape resembles that of a crow's beak"])
(Latin: bark, rind; literally, that which is "stripped off"; used in its extended senses, chief among these being "pertaining to the outer layer of a bodily organ, especially the brain")
(The U.S. is in danger of losing its status as the world's greatest talent magnet)
(Just two of many lexicons that need to clarify all of the word contents for a better understanding instead of using another form of one of the words that is being defined to explain the other entries or simply not providing any information about the other words besides the primary entry.)
(Greek: duty, that which is binding; obligation; necessity)
(Greek: believe, belief; that which is thought to be true by someone who has the power or right to give orders, make decisions, and to enforce his or her opinions, doctrines, praise, or beliefs)
(Animal health and dung beetle health: they are both vital)
(Latin: first part of the small intestine; based on duodecim, "twelve", because its length is approximately twelve finger-breadths)
(Greek: abortion, untimely birth; primarily used to mean "congenital absence" or "defect" of a part which is normally present)
(Greek: image, figure, form, shape; literally, "that which is seen")
(Greek: to drive, strike, beat out; general application is "beaten metal, metal plate")
(Greek > Latin: that which is thrust into something; wedge, stopper; interpolation, obstruction; from "throw in" or "throw into")
(Greek: brain; that which is inside the head)
(Indo-European is believed to be the origin of many modern languages)
(the uniformity of American English is largely a result of the improved modes of travel and communication)
(Mongolian leaders believe that English is the key to economic progress)
(the English language is viewed as a ticket to the future in Mongolia and other countries)
(an accurate count is impossible)
(Anglo Saxon or Teutonic: in Old English times, eye was eage, which is related to a whole range of words for "eye" in other European languages; including, Greek ophthalmos and Latin oculus [with all of its subsequent derivatives])
(Latin: an insoluble protein that is an essential part of blood coagulation)
(Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is the practice of extracting natural gas from underground shale deposits by injecting high-pressure streams of water, sand, and chemicals)
(eating dirt or earth is a common practice on a global scale)
(Latin: to make a collection; to gather what is left after the reapers)
(Latin: glue, sticky substance which remains in flour when the starch is taken out)
(Greek > Latin: generation, genesis, origination; creation [Greek: gonos, -gonia > Latin: -gonia, "that which is begotten, offspring"])
(Greek: to scratch; to write, to record, to draw, to describe; that which is written or described)
(Greek: something that is wrong; sin, evil behavior; wickedness in living; misconduct; that part of theology that deals with sin or immoral deeds)
(Latin: heir; "he, or she, who obtains that which is left")
(Greek: tissue [web]; beam or warp of a loom; hence, that which is woven; a web or tissue; used in the sense of pertaining to [body] tissue)
(hoodwink, deceive, cheat; believed to be from hocus pocus which is probably from a pseudo Latin phrase: hax pax max Deus adimax, that was used by traveling conjurers to impress their audiences)
(The human body is at the edge of human comprehension with its microcosmic mysteries and its 100 trillion cells!)
(Latin: a suffix that forms English adjectives from Latin adjectives ending with -is or -ius with meanings about "pertaining to, relating to", or "characterized by")
(Latin: suffix form of -an from -ianus, a modifier of the main word to which it is attached: belonging to, coming from, being involved in, or being like something)
(Greek: a suffix; pertaining to; of the nature of, like; in chemistry, it denotes a higher valence of the element than is expressed by -ous)
(Greek: a suffix that forms nouns and is usually used to form names of arts and sciences)
(Creativity is achieved by focusing and striving with one's chosen objective regardless of what others say or have done! In essence, it is a conception and the completion of the chosen vision.)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix that is used to form hundreds of words that mean: similar to, resembling, like, characterized by, or of the nature of)
(Latin: funnel; literally, "the [little] thing into which something is poured"; a funnel-shaped organ of the body)
(Latin: oculus used as a reference to "eye" to designate something that looks like or is suggestive of a person's organ of sight including potato "eyes")
(Latin: a bug; literally, "cut into," from insectum, with a notched or divided body; literally, "that which is cut up, segmented" [as the bodies of the first invertebrates to which the term was applied or appeared to be])
(Latin: island; derived from insul[a], "island" [used here in reference to the islands [islets] of Langerhans, irregular structures in the pancreas that produce the protein hormone insulin which is secreted into the blood where it regulates sugar metabolism])
(The Right Web Hosting Provider Is the KEY to a Happy and Successful Website Presence)
(the word internet is now a common noun, not a proper noun)
(Greek: equal; by extension: same, similar, alike; normally used as a prefix)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; one who believes in; one who is engaged in; someone who does something)
(contronyms or words which have definitions that are self-antonyms; that is, which have two meanings that are the opposites of each other)
(Greek: containing, or derived from keratin, a highly insoluble scleroprotein that is the main constituent of horny tissues, the nails, and the organic matrix of tooth enamel; derived from Greek kera[s], kerat[os], "horn")
(taking it even when it is not needed)
(Latin: insect in its grub stage; from Latin larva, "mask" and by extension, "ghost", the idea being that an insect in its grub stage is merely a ghost of its future self and bears no resemblance to its future form)
(Greek > Latin: an assumption that is taken for granted; a premise)
(Greek: leukos, white; the primary meaning now is the color "white"; but it also includes the meanings of "light, clear, bright")
(Greek: stone, rock; hard consolidated mineral matter; hard matter formed from mineral and earth material; hard substance that is solid)
(Deep-sea animals have made attempts to light their cold and dark environments by carrying their own lights on their heads and on every other conceivable part of the bodies; including their eyes and tails and the insides of their mouths. The light they shed is living light.)
(Latin: place; from place to place; where something is positioned or situated)
(Greek: water, yellowish fluid; connected with, or containing, lymph, a transparent fluid that is derived from body tissue and conveyed to the bloodstream by the lymphatic vessels)
(Greek > Latin: learning, science, that which is learned; knowledge)
(Latin: medium is the neuter form of the adjective medius, meaning "middle"; as well as, a neuter noun meaning, "the middle")
(Greek: a combining form occurring in the names of chemical compounds in which the methyl group is present; alcohol, wine)
(the mosquito is the original skin diver)
(Latin: much, many; combining form of Latin multus "much, many"; which is related to the Greek mala, "very, very much, exceedingly")
(Greek: mucus; a protective secretion from the mucous membranes in the nose, throat, and lungs; a thick fluid produced by the linings of some tissues of the body and is secreted as a protective lubricant coating by cells and glands of the mucous membranes)
(Greek > Latin: secret, occult [probable literal meaning is "one whose eyes are closed"])
(Greek: thread, that which is spun; pertaining to a thread-like structure used in many scientific terms)
(Latin: Probably from mitulus "mussel", of unknown origin [the change from m to n has not been explained]. It is also said to possibly come from Latin nidificare or nidulari, "to nest"; from nidus "nest", but there is no confirmation for either theory)
(an explanation of what it is and where it came from)
(Greek: a suffix meaning: to talk, to speak; a branch of knowledge; any science or academic field that ends in -ology which is a variant of -logy; a person who speaks in a certain manner; someone who deals with certain topics or subjects)
(Latin: foreboding; anything perceived or happening that is believed to portend or to suggest that something is going to happen which may be a good or an evil event or circumstance in the future)
(Greek: said to be a stem for "all, every, whole", or "complete"; that is, a field of study in biology that refers to the whole set of omics including their -omics and -ome subfields in order to understand life as a holistic existence and organic beings as a whole)
(Greek: used as a suffix; view; sight; see, that which is seen)
(Greek: pancreas [pan, "all" plus kreas, "flesh"; the idea apparently being that the pancreas is an organ composed entirely of glandular flesh])
(Greek: beyond expectations; surprise endings; a pun which is fun)
(Latin: foot, feet; people often see this ped element in other words. When people refer to "pedal extremities", they mean "feet". When anyone pushes the pedals of a bicycle, it is done with the feet. A pedestrian must use the feet for walking. A quadruped has four feet while a centipede has "100 feet"; or a large number of them because it may be impossible to count all of them.)
(Greek: pemphix, "blister"; blistering skin diseases or a swelling of the skin that contains watery fluid and is caused by burning or irritation; a bump or small swelling on or beneath the skin)
(Greek > Modern Latin: abnormal reduction, decrease in, insufficient, deficiency. Originally, the meaning was poverty, need; sometimes it is erroneously or incorrectly rendered as -poenia)
(Greek: a combining form confused between three Greek roots and may mean "hunger", "dirt", or "drink"; and there is one Latin form referring to the "pine tree")
(avoid redundancies or excessive repetitiousness by not using unnecessary repetitions and superfluous words or more word usages than is needed, desired, or required)
(Greek: near; resembling that which is named by the combining root)
(Wilfred Owen challenges our thinking about whether it is really so sweet and fitting to die for one's country)
(thinking that you can be successful in achieving an objective is a vital mental condition, but thinking that you can not do it is almost a guarantee that you will not be successful as indicated by Walter Wintle)
(Latin: prandium, literally, that which is eaten early)
(Latin: a sign, an omen, portent; a wonder, a person; especially, a child who is endowed with extraordinary qualities)
(seeing is believing; even if some things have to be believed in order to be seen)
(situation in which less and less is done by more and more officials; government agency where after all is said and done, more is said than done)
(an agency where after all is said and done, more is said than done.)
(a book that is bound to be used and where one word leads to another and another, ad infinitum)
(our planet, whose interior is very hot but whose exterior is not so hot; a minor planet with major problems; and a jigsaw puzzle with a peace missing)
(just because we were born that way is no justification for staying in such a condition)
(if patients are fortunate, this is the art of keeping them involved while nature cures their diseases)
(something that may not be golden, but is worth its weight in gold and which can't be misquoted)
(a situation where the IQ is not as important as the I will)
(a nation that utilizes automation and technology, but which is depending more and more on outsourcing to other nations for the experts in those areas)
(a time when there is less pax and more tax)
(a female who is either a hit or a miss)
(ignorance word usage is no excuse for continuing such ignorance)
(there is a lack of understanding as to how RFID works)
(RFID Is ready for more and more organizations)
(RFID is being extended in NATO)
(bill is proposed in New Hampshire, U.S., to place limits on RFID applications)
(what it is and what its future may be)
(Latin: ray, radiating [the Latin word for the spokes of a wheel is radius]; spoke, staff, rod)
(Latin: straight [intestine], direct, right; that is, "the part of the large intestine that ends at the anus")
(Greek: rhetorike tekhne, "the technique or art of public speaking" > Latin: orator; that which is spoken)
(a Czech word, robota meaning "serf" or "slave" or "forced work" which is now applied to any manufactured device that is capable of doing work ordinarily done by human beings)
(Latin: to chew over again, to chew the cud; to muse or to meditate; that is, to think about something in a deep and serious or dreamy and abstracted way or to think about something carefully, calmly, seriously, and for a long time)
(Is United States Losing the Science Race?)
(John Robertson, a committed lexicographer who is utilizing the past and the present to provide word information for our modern age)
(Latin: a speaking, talking, delivering religious messages; literally, "that which is put together in a certain order")
(Hebrew: the grave; hell; pit [a gloomy netherworld for departed spirits; Shoel is the counterpart of Hades and Tartarus])
(Latin: sound, that which is heard; noise)
(a secretly hidden coding that dates back to ancient Greece and is used even in this modern era)
("The Emperor's New Clothes" by Hans Christian Andersen is a fable about the pitfalls of political self-aggrandizement and the fear of people to face reality even when they know that the reality of the situation is untrue)
(Latin > French: device for calculating a distance traveled (in a vehicle for hire) and the corresponding fare is charged)
(Greek > Latin: case, capsule, sheath, container, receptacle [also: a placing, a setting, a putting]; "a place where" something is kept)
(Latin: to ring, to jingle; formed by reduplication (for the sake of emphasis) from the base of Latin tinnire, which is of imitative origin.)
(Greek: childbirth, delivery, a reference to the production of offspring; that which is brought forth)
(toilet paper is a very modern product of convenience)
(unusual water recycling device is revealed)
(Greek > Latin: sound, tone; that which is stretched, a stretching, a straining, a pitch of the voice, a musical note)
(funding is invigorating a field which challenges some traditional aspects of science)
(Latin: to assign, to allot, to bestow, to give, to grant; from tribe, to give out among the tribes was tribuere which is the source of many of the words located in this unit)
(also known as trichinellosis, it is caused by eating raw or undercooked pork and wild game products)
(Greek: third; a number which is often used as a prefix)
(Greek: that which is round[ed]; a wheel, a disk)
(Latin: of, relating to, or resembling; compound of the suffixes -ule, "little, small" and -ar, "pertaining to, of the nature of, like"; and so, -ular is a combining form meaning: referring to something "specified": appendicular, molecular, pedicular; as well as, a combining form meaning "resembling" something specified: circular, globular, tubular)
(Latin: womb; hollow, muscular organ of the female reproductive system in which the fertilized ovum, or egg, and the fetus, unborn baby, is nourished and grows until birth)
(Latin: animating, enlivening; vigorous, vigor, active; to be alive, activity, to quicken; then a quickening action of growing; a specific sense of "plant cultivated for food, edible herb, or root" is first recorded in 1767; the differences between the meanings from its original links with "life, liveliness" was completed in the early twentieth century, when vegetable came to be used for an "inactive person".)
(Latin: victima, an animal or a human that is offered as a sacrifice to a god; perhaps a religiously consecrated creature)
(Latin: internal organs; all that is under the skin, all parts in the body except flesh or muscles; entrails; any large interior organ in any of the three great cavities of the body; specifically, those within the chest; such as, the heart or lungs; or in the abdomen; such as, the liver, pancreas, and intestines; and in the head; such as, the brain)
(the vulture is near extinction in India)
(Greek: the malar bone or the arch that the malar bone forms with the other bones to which it is connected)
Word Entries containing the term: “is
A bicycle can't stand on its own because it is two tired.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A boiled egg in the morning is hard to beat.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A carnation is a country where everyone owns a car.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A committee is a group of people who keep minutes and waste hours.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A dermatologist is someone who makes rash judgments.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A kangaroo is the largest species of grasshopper known to humans.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A keyring is used for holding all kinds of keys, except the key to success.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A lot of money is tainted: It taint yours and it taint mine.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A man's home is his castle, in a manor of speaking.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A midget fortune-teller who escapes from prison is a small medium at large.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A plateau is a high form of flattery.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A secret is enough for one, too much for two, and nothing at all for three.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A sleeping bull is a bulldozer.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A sponge is something that is full of holes but it still can hold water.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
A war does not determine who is right, only who is left.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Adolescence is a period when teenagers feel that they will never be as ignorant as their parents.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
An acre is someone who is in pain.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
An adult is someone who has stopped growing at both ends and is now growing in the middle.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
An autobiography is a history of cars.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
An eyedropper is a clumsy ophthalmologist.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Benign is what a person becomes after he or she is eight.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Biology is the study of anything that comes in twos.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Cauterize is what happened when a guy made eye contact with a woman.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Condescending is a convict escaping down the wall of a prison using a rope.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Congress is the opposite of progress.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Consciousness is that annoying time between naps.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Dilate is someone who lives for a long time.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Diplomacy is the art of getting other people to do it your way.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Dogma is a mother dog with puppies.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Efficiency expert: A person smart enough to tell others how to run their businesses but who is too smart to start his or her own.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Egotist: someone who is usually me-deep in conversation.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Electricity is essential for many people

Electricity is both a basic part of nature and one of our most widely used global forms of energy

Electricity is actually a secondary energy source known as an energy carrier. This means we get electricity from the conversion of other sources of energy; such as, coal, nuclear, wind, water power, solar energy, etc.

These sources of energy for electricity are called primary sources and the energy sources used to make electricity can be renewable or non-renewable, but electricity itself is neither renewable nor nonrenewable.

Electricity use has resulted in dramatic changes in the way our world exists because before electricity became available over 100 years ago, houses had no light at night or people used candles, then kerosene lamps. Food was cooled in iceboxes (or not at all), and rooms were warmed by wood-burning or coal-burning stoves.

Many scientists and inventors have worked to decipher the principles of electricity since the 1600s and notable accomplishments were made by Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Edison, and Nikola Tesla.

Today, scientists are still studying electricity and learning more about it. They've learned that all citizens need to practice good safety habits, since electricity can be very dangerous.

Benjamin Franklin demonstrated that lightning is electricity, Thomas Edison invented the first long-lasting incandescent light bulb and Nikola Tesla discovered the principles of alternating electricity currents.

Before 1879, direct current (DC) electricity was used in arc lights for outdoor lighting. In the late 1800's, Nikola Tesla pioneered the generation, transmission, and use of alternating current (AC) electricity, which reduced the cost of transmitting electricity over long distances.

Tesla's inventions used electricity to bring indoor lighting to our homes and to power industrial machines.

In spite of the fact that electricity is important in the daily lives of people in industrialized nations, few probably stop to think what life would be like without electricity.

Regrettably, too many people in the world are still deprived of the pleasures and advantages of having access to electricity.

Like air and water, people who have normal use of electricity tend to take it for granted; even though they use electricity to do so many tasks every day; from lighting, heating, and cooling their homes to powering their televisions, kitchen equipment, computers, and other appliances run by electricity.

About the only time users of electricity really appreciate their electrical power and what it does is when it is cut off by storms or by some other abnormal situation.

—Compiled from various sources as seen in this
Electronic Bibliography page.

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 22)
encapsulate [incapsulate is a less common spelling] (verb), encapsulates; encapsulated; encapsulating
1. To encase in or as if in a capsule.
2. To express in a brief summary; epitomize: headlines that encapsulate the news.
3. To show or to express the main idea or quality of something in a brief way.
4. To completely cover something; especially, so that it will not touch anything else: "The contaminated material should be encapsulated and removed."
encapsulation; incapsulation is a less common spelling
1. The act or process of enclosing or being enclosed within a sheath not normal to the part.
2. The growth of a membrane around (any part) so as to enclose it in a capsule.
3. Formation of a capsule or a sheath around a structure.
4. Computer science, the ability to provide computer users with a well-defined interface to a set of functions in a way which hides their internal workings.
5. Computer science, a method of making a software system modular by creating well-defined interface routines that deal with a particular kind of data and allowing other programs to access the data only through those routines; the interface routines encapsulate the data.
6. Photovoltaic or the production of electric power from electromagnetic radiation, involving a method by which photovoltaic cells are protected from the environment, typically by being laminated between a glass superstrate (covering on the sun side of a photovoltaic module) and an ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) substrate (physical support material on which an integrated circuit is constructed).

Photovoltaic cells are single semiconducting elements of small size that absorb light or other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum and emit electricity.

This entry is located in the following unit: capsulo-, capsul-, caps- (page 2)
Etc. is an abbreviation that sometimes makes others think you know more than you really do.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Experience is the name we give to the mistakes we make.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
Giraffiti is vandalism spray-painted very, very high, such as on an overpass.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
Handicap is a ready-to-use hat.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
Health: Oxytocin Is Found to Have Benefits
Inhaling oxytocin can result in positive reactions.
This entry is located in the following unit: Health: Index of Articles (page 1)
Intense is where campers sleep.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
Is demum miser est, cuius nobilitas miserias nobilitat.
Translation: Indeed, wretched is the man whose fame makes his misfortunes famous.
—Lucius Accius (c.170-86 B.C.)
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 5) miser- (page 1)
Is minimum eget mortalis qui minimum eupit.
That man is least in want who desires least.

From Publilius Syrus, Sententiae (c.43 B.C.).

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
Polygamy is marriage to many spouses, while monotony is considered by some as marriage to just one spouse.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 5)
Radio Frequency Identification (RFID): What is RFID?
An explanation of what RFID is.
This entry is located in the following unit: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID): Index of Units (page 1)
Secret: something that is told to just one person at a time.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 5)
Selfish is what the owner of a seafood store does.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 5)
situation is calm and quiet
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 20)
The last thing I want to do is hurt you; however, it's still on my list.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 6)
To belong is to take one’s time.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 6)
To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism. To steal from many sources is research.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 6)
Toothache is the pain that drives some people to extraction.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 6)
unauspicious [inauspicious is the preferred spelling] (s) (adjective)
Not favorable, not successful: "Steve's unauspicious hopes indicated his pessimism about the undertaking."
unauspiciously [inauspiciously is the preferred spelling] (adverb)
Unfortunately, unfavorably: "After losing so much money, Roger decided that his success as a gambler had been unauspiciously determined."
vandalize, vandalizes, vandalized, vandalizing (verb forms); British spelling is vandalise
To deliberately destroy, damage, or to deface property; either private or public: "Their car was vandalized when it was parked in the street."

"The school was broken into and there was considerable vandalizing done to walls in the halls, class rooms, and even in the library."

This entry is located in the following units: -ize (page 10) vandal- (page 1)
When a clock is hungry, it goes back four seconds.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 6)
When someone is in prison, what is his or her favorite punctuation mark?

A period, because it is at the end of a sentence.

This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 7)
Wife-beating is "sanctioned" by Koran according to a German judge

A German judge has stirred a storm of protest in Frankfurt, Germany, by citing the Koran in turning down a German Muslim wife's request for a fast-track divorce on the ground that her husband beat her.

In a remarkable ruling that underlines the tension between Muslim customs and European laws, the judge, Christa Datz-Winter, said the couple came from a Moroccan cultural environment in which it is common for husbands to beat their wives. The Koran, she wrote, sanctions such physical abuse.

News of the ruling brought swift and sharp condemnation from politicians, legal experts, and Muslim leaders in Germany; many of whom said they were confounded that a German judge would put seventh-century Islamic religious teaching ahead of German law in deciding a case of domestic violence.

While legal experts said the ruling was a judicial misstep rather than evidence of a broader trend, it comes at a time of rising tensions in Germany and elsewhere in Europe, as authorities in many fields struggle to reconcile Western values with their burgeoning Muslim minorities.

Last fall, a Berlin opera house canceled performances of a modified Mozart opera because of security fears stirred by an added scene that depicted the severed head of the Prophet Muhammad.

Stung by charges that it had surrendered its artistic freedom, it staged the opera three months later without incident.

To some people here, the ruling reflects a similar compromising of basic values in the name of cultural sensitivity.

Muslim leaders agreed that Muslims living here must be judged by the German legal code, but they were just as offended by what they characterized as the judge's misinterpretation of a much-debated passage in the Koran governing relations between husbands and wives.

For some people, the greatest damage done by this episode is to other Muslim women suffering from domestic abuse. Many already fear going to court against their spouses.

There have been a series of so-called "honor killings" here in which Turkish Muslim men have murdered women.

—Compiled from excerpts of an article,
"German judge rouses anger by citing Koran: She claims it sanctions wife-beating";
by Mark Landler; International Herald Tribune; March 23, 2007; pages 1 & 4.
This entry is located in the following unit: sanct-, sancti- (page 3)
Worry is like a rocking chair; it will give you something to do, but it won’t get you anywhere.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 7)
(what resembles an odd marriage between Trojan battle gear and Medusa is actually part of the most powerful brain scanner ever made)
(judicial or legal words that may apply to trial processes that determine the guilt or innocence of people which is ascertained by either judges or juries)
(this summary of English history is continued from the Get Words home page)
(the language of France is also spoken in Belgium, Switzerland, Canada, Haiti, Monaco, New Caledonia, and several other countries including some areas of the U.S.; such as, Louisiana and some New England states)
(ecology is the study of the relationship between organisms and the environments in which they live, including all living and nonliving components)
(the laser that can produce quadrillions of pulses of light per second, creating a spot on a cell that is as hot as the sun)
(this is an over-all listing of the special groups of topics listed on this site)
(expressing a strong feeling or emphasizing what is shown)
(mathematics is the deductive study of quantities, magnitudes, and shapes as determined by the use of numbers and symbols while every branch of science and engineering depends on mathematics; measurement is the process of associating numbers with physical quantities and phenomena and measurement is fundamental to the sciences; to engineering, construction, and other technical fields; and to almost all everyday activities)
(the Mexican marijuana trade is more robust and brazen than ever before)
(numerical fun is available for you here)
(A few clips from Old Age Is Not for Sissies by Art Linkletter)
(Shakespeare is given credit for coining more than 1,500 words for the English language)
(there is much more to learn about the mysterious processes of sleep and the things that disturb it)
(engineering is the technical science in which properties of matter and the sources of power in nature are made useful to people; such as, in structures, devices, machines, and products)
(a suffix freely used to designate someone who is associated with, concerned with, or characterized by a thing or an expression; sometimes, with a jocular [humorous] or derisive [contempt or ridicule] intent; borrowed from Russian, a common personal suffix)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “is
Dung Beetle Survival Is Essential
Animal health and dung beetle health: they are both vital unit.
It doesn’t do much good to lock the barn door after the horse is stolen.
Don’t lock the barn door after the horse is stolen.

Of little value his compunctions
Who assumes clavinous functions
When once from circumambient pen,
Is snatched its equine denizen.
The love of money is the root of all evil (Timothy 6:10)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)
The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak (Matthew 26:41)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)
The writing is on the wall (Daniel 5: 5/6)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)
Woe is me (Job 10:15)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)