You searched for: “in
in, in, inn
in (IN) (preposition)
Within the limits, bounds, or area of: Scott, you are in your rights to ask for catsup to eat with your fries.
in (IN) (adverb)
From the outside to a point inside: After waiting for about 15 minutes, Fay finally was walking in the dining room to a table.
inn (IN) (noun)
A public lodging house serving food and drink to travelers; a hotel: Debora stayed at a charming inn during her mountain vacation.

When Helena arrived at the reception desk of the inn, she inquired whether she was in time for dinner and then when she was told, yes, she had plenty of time, she was shown to a table in the restaurant, so she could order her meal.

More possibly related word entries
Units related to: “in
(Greek: in, into, inward; within; near, at; to put, to go into, or to cover with; as, entomb, encamp, enfold; to provide with; as, to enlighten; to cause to be; as, to enlarge; thoroughly; as, enmesh; in, within, into; as enzootic)
(Greek: within, inside, into, in, on, inner)
(Latin: in, into, within, inside, on, toward [il-, ir-, im-], in, into, etc.: involve, incur, invade; also, used intensively, as in the words inflame and inflammable, or without perceptible force.)
(Old English, Middle English: in, into; within; toward; a prefix used in front of English words, not Latin or Greek elements; as in the words, indoors and inland)
(Latin: to be lenient [toward], accede, take pleasure [in]; originally, "to be kind, kindness; to be long-suffering, to be patient")
(Latin: in-, "in" + filtratus, "felt")
(Latin: within, inside, into, in, inward)
(owls come in several shapes and sizes)
(confusion exists about usage of "a" and "an" in front of other words)
(Greek > Latin: suffix; from French -aque, or directly from Latin -acus, from Greek -akos forming adjectives. This suffix was used to form names of arts and sciences in Greek and it is now generally used to form new names of sciences in English; meanings, "related to, of the nature of, pertaining to, referring to")
(Greek > Latin: [originally, Academus/Akademus, a name of a hero in Greek mythology; then it became a gymnasium near Athens where Plato taught])
(Latin: derived from aceto- plus the suffix -yl; used in naming chemical radicals)
(Latin: grape, grapes in a cluster)
(Latin: suffix; forming adjectives; inclined to, given to, tendency to be, abounding in)
(Greek: ray [as of light] or like a ray in form; radiance, radiation; a radiating or tentacled structure)
(Latin: to set in motion, to hurry, to shake; to drive; to do, to act; to lead, to conduct, to guide)
(Greek: struggle, a contest, to contend for a prize; also, to lead, set in motion, drive, conduct, guide, govern; to do, to act; by extension, pain)
(Greek: in medicine, a painful seizure or sudden-acute pain; as, with gout)
(Greek > Latin: fields; wild, savage; living in the fields, via ager, agri.)
(Greek: land, soil, field, fields; earth; wild, as one who lives in the fields; wildness; savage, savageness)
(Greek: sleeplessness, wakefulness; originally, it meant "sleeping in the field")
(Greek: one another, of one another; literally, "the other"; reciprocally; in mutual relation)
(Greek > Latin: fox; baldness; derived from "mange in foxes"; bald patches on the head)
(Greek: ; beginning, first of anything; first letter of the Greek alphabet; used in physics and chemistry to designate a variety of series or values)
(Greek: sand; used primarily in botany and zoology)
(Latin: suffix; indicating a person who specializes in something)
(the importance of Latin and Greek in the development of English as revealed in the history of English)
(Greek: man, men, male, masculine; also, stamen or anther as used in botany)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(Latin: before, in front of, prior to, forward; used as a prefix)
(Latin: before, in front of; fore, prior, preceding; used as a prefix)
(Greek: cave, cavern; in medicine, of or pertaining to a [bodily] cavity or sinus; a term in anatomical nomenclature, especially to designate a cavity or chamber within a bone)
(Latin: anxius, solicitous, uneasy, troubled in mind)
(Greek: spider; the arachnoidea; when used in medicine this Greek element refers to a membrane, veins, or any web-like structure in the body)
(Greek > Latin: chief, principal leader, first [in position or rank])
(Greek: govern, rule; ruler, chief [first in position])
(Greek: original [first in time], beginning, first cause, origin, ancient, primitive, from the beginning; most basic)
(a suffix which forms nouns that refer to people who regularly engage in some activity, or who are characterized in a certain way, as indicated by the stem or root of the word; originally, which appeared in Middle English in words from Old French where it expressed an intensive degree or with a pejorative or disparaging application)
(Latin: harena, "sand" or "arena" in English, became the general term for "shows" and now it refers more to "sports", etc.)
(Latin: harena, "sand" or "arena" in English, became the general term for "shows" and now it refers more to "sports", etc.)
(Greek: of, or pertaining to "god of war", Ares or Mars, used primarily in astronomy)
(Latin: a suffix forming adjectives from nouns ending in -ary; a person who, a thing that; a person who is a part of something, pertaining to one's state or condition; a person who has a connection with or belief in the stated subject; a promotor of something; a native or inhabitant of someplace; someone of a certain age)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; a place for; abounding in or connected with something; a place containing or related to that which is specified by the root)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; used in medicine to denote a state or condition of)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; one who; forms nouns from verbs in -ize; nouns denoting the adherent of a certain doctrine, principle, or custom)
(understanding astronomical phenomena in terms of the laws of physics)
(Greek: struggle, a contest [in war or in sports], to contend for a prize; physical activity, rigorous self-discipline or training)
(Danish or Norwegian: eighteen; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Latin: diviner, soothsayer; a member of the college of priests in Rome, who foretold the future; in ancient Rome, a priest who foretold events by interpreting omens)
(Latin: to look, to observe in order to make a prediction; to see omens; from auspex [genitive form auspicis] avi-, stem of avis, "bird" plus -spex, "observer", from specere)
(Latin: to long eagerly for; to wish, to desire; to have a keen interest in something; an intense eagerness to do something)
(Greek: indicates the presence of nitrogen in chemistry)
(Greek: rod-shaped micro-organism; used in biomedical terminology)
(Greek: weight, heavy; atmospheric pressure; a combining form meaning "pressure", as in barotaxis, or sometimes "weight", as in baromacrometer)
(using an instrument to detect photoluminescent signals in marine environments)
(the bearded races of mankind have commonly held the beard in high honor)
(scientist, inventor, printer, writer, patriot, and diplomat; sharing his contribution of wisdom to generations from the past, in the present, and into the future)
(Greek: B, β; second letter of the Greek alphabet and the second object in any order of arrangement or classification)
(references used in the contents of Word Info)
(Latin: bile; which is a digestive juice secreted by the liver, stored in the gallbladder, and aids in the digestion of fats)
(controlling access has its advantages)
(definitions of terms used in biometric technology)
(Utilizing nature in the present and in the future with engineering designs)
(biological theft by illegally collecting indigenous plants, microbes, enzymes, etc. by corporations who patent them for their own commercial use as defined at this bio unit page)
(Greek: insertion; literally, "something thrown in")
(Greek: mucus; a slippery protective secretion that is produced in the linings of some organs of the body by the mucous membranes and glands)
(Greek: turning like oxen in plowing; alternate lines in opposite directions; zig-zag procedure)
(Greek: slow, slowness; delayed, tardy; a prefix used in the sense of being "abnormally slow")
(Greek: windpipe or one of the two large branches of the trachea, the tube in air-breathing vertebrates that conducts air from the throat to the bronchi, strengthened by incomplete rings of cartilage)
(Latin: burere, "to burn up"; from urere, with an inserted or faulty separation of b in amburere, "to burn around"; which stands for amb-urere, "to burn around", but it was misdivided into am-burere and because of this misdivision, the new verb burere was formed with the past participle bustum; so, it really came from urere, "to burn, to singe")
(a compilation of several languages)
(a Roman month in retrospection)
(links to a variety of languages)
(Greek: shell; husk; cup [of a flower], used primarily in the specialized senses of "pertaining to or of a cup-shaped bodily organ or cavity"; also a reference to the "cup-shaped ring of sepals encasing a flower bud")
(Greek > Latin: reed, pipe; the word for "reed" in Hebrew, Arabic, and Egyptian was kaneh; then the word element passed into Greek and Latin, and into the languages of western Europe)
(Part 2 of 4: "The Ballad of Salvation Bill" by Robert Service was based on experiences he had with a compulsive smoker who just had to smoke because smoking was so important in his life)
(Part 3 of 4: smoking and anti-smoking, or anti-tobacco, have been in conflict for more than a century regarding those who smoke)
(Part 1 of 4: fear and hatred of tobacco smoke or being around smokers and being exposed to smoking in general)
(Part 2 of 4: fear and hatred of tobacco smoke and the efforts to restrict smoking in public places)
(Part 4 of 4: smoking in public and the efforts to ban, or to restrict, second-hand smoke that threatens the lives of waiters, waitresses, and innocent customers so they don't have to suffer from the discomfort and health perils presented by smokers)
(Greek: down, downward; under, lower; against; entirely, in accordance with, completely; definitely)
(Greek > Latin: to let down, to insert, to thrust in [kata, "down" plus hienai, "to send"])
(Latin: to be in motion; to go, to go away, to yield, to give up, to withdraw)
(Latin: frequented, populous; to frequent in great numbers, to assemble, to honor; thronged)
(Latin: unmarried; vow not to marry; chaste, morally pure in thought and conduct; that which is considered to be decent and virtuous behavior)
(Latin: a storeroom, a chamber, a closet; by extension, of or pertaining to a cell, a microscopic protoplasmic mass made up of a nucleus enclosed in a semipermeable membrane)
(Greek: hollow; abdomen; hernia; used primarily in the sense of concave; pertaining to a bodily cavity)
(Latin: hundred; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Greek > Latin: center; middle point, mid point; focus, focal point, focalize; zero in on)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; first made at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at the University of California in Berkeley; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; first made at the University of California and named for California and the University of California in Berkeley; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; named for the asteroid Ceres which was discovered in 1803 and named for the Roman goddess Ceres; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; named for Ytterby, a village in Sweden; where gadolite was found; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; named in honor of Enrico Fermi, an Italian-American physicist; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, helios, the sun, first observed in the sun’s atmosphere; gas)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Latin, Magnesia, a district in Asia Minor; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; named in honor of Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeléyev, a Russian chemist who contributed so much to the development of the periodic table; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; named in honor of Alfred Nobel; the discovery was made at the Nobel Institute; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, named in honor of the asteroid Pallas, which was discovered at about the same time; and for Pallas, the Greek goddess of wisdom; metal)
(Greek: prasios, "green", plus didymos, "twin" [with the element neodymium] because of a green line in its spectrum; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: from Latin Rhenus, in honor of the Rhine River in Germany; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, rhodon, "rose"; in reference to the red color of its salts; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Latin rubidus, "red"; from the red lines in its spectrum; metal)
(Modern Latin: named for Ruthenia [Latin for Russia] in the Urals, where one was first found; metal)
(Modern Latin: named for Strontian, "a village in Scotland"; metal)
(Modern Latin: named for the mythical king Tantalus [who in the Greek myths was tortured by being placed in water up to his chin, which he was never able to drink, whence the word “tantalize”]; because of the element’s insolubility or “to illustrate the tantalizing work he had until he succeeded in isolating this element”; metal)
(Modern Latin: named for Ytterby, a village in Sweden; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: named for Ytterby, a quarry in Sweden where the first rare earth had been discovered; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: named for Ytterby, near Vaxholm in Sweden; rare earth)
(Greek: khimaira, fabled monster; unreal, fantastic, imaginary, fanciful, unrealistic; however, in medical and other scientific fields, characterized by two or more genetically distinct cell types in one organism)
(perceptions of China and the Chinese in their actual interrelationships with themselves and the rest of the world; as well as, the potential hazards and perils of their global dominance)
(Greek: choledochos, from chole, "bile" + dechomai, "to receive"; the common bile duct or tube; conveying bile; containing bile, which is a yellow-green fluid that is made by the liver, stored in the gallbladder, and passes through the common bile duct into the first section of the small intestine or duodenum where it helps to digest fat)
(Greek: disease in which the bodily humors [biles] are subject to violent discharge; characterized by severe vomiting and diarrhea)
(Greek: khorde, "gut string" [of a lyre]; used in an extended sense to mean "sinew, flexible rod-shaped organ, string, cord"; Latin: chorda, "related notes in music, string of a musical instrument, cat-gut" via Old French, corde, "rope, string, twist, cord")
(Greek: dance; involuntary movements; spasm; in medicine, it is used to reveal a nervous disorder either of organic origin or from an infection)
(Latin: around, about, surrounding, closed curve, circling, circular on all sides; literally, "in a circle")
(Latin: talk, speak, say; to put into quick motion, to excite, to provoke, to call urgently; to summon, to summon forth, to arouse, to stimulate; used in the sense of "stimulating")
(Greek: break, break in pieces; broken, broken in pieces, crush; bend)
(Greek > Latin: bars, lattice, grate; used in the sense of "lattice[d], latticelike")
(Greek: inclination, slope; the [supposed] slope of the earth from the equator towards the poles; hence, the latitudinal zone of the earth and prevailing weather in a given zone)
(Greek: bed; slope, slant; to lean, leaning; an ecological term; in the sense of a slope or gradient)
(Greek: twig; later, in modern usage: repetition, carbon copy, same)
(Greek: cuckoo; the end of the vertebral column in man and in some apes; the rudiment of a tail)
(Greek: spiral shell, snail with a spiral shell; pertaining to the cochlea, the spiral tube in the inner ear)
(Latin: to inhabit; to live in, to live on, to live among; to dwell; living among, dwelling in; occurring on, occurring in)
(Greek: sheath, scabbard; in medicine, a combining form that means "sheath" or "vagina")
(Greek: glue; used in the sense of "pertaining to a colloid, a gelatinous [gluelike] substance in which particle matter is suspended")
(completed units of words that contain word entries that have both enhanced definitions and appropriate usages in context sentences while units of compositions presents additional information about specific words or topics)
(Latin: to deliberate together, to consider; a magistrate in ancient Rome who sought information or advice from the Roman Senate)
(Latin: to cook, to prepare food, to ripen, to digest, to turn over in the mind)
(Greek: crowlike; used in the specialized sense of "pertaining to, or connected to the coracoid, the bony process that forms part of the scapular arch [and is so named because its shape resembles that of a crow's beak"])
(Latin: bark, rind; literally, that which is "stripped off"; used in its extended senses, chief among these being "pertaining to the outer layer of a bodily organ, especially the brain")
(Greek: kosmos to cosmos; "world, universe"; from its "perfect order and arrangement"; to order, to arrange, to adorn; well-ordered, regular, arranged; skilled in adornment, which came into English as cosmetic.)
(The U.S. is in danger of losing its status as the world's greatest talent magnet)
(getting a "fire in the head" in order to get the flame of creativity in motion)
(Latin: twilight, dusky, dawn; in the evening or early-morning hours; dim, indistinct)
(Latin: to become greater or larger in amount or size, to grow, to multiply, to increase; to reproduce)
(Greek: ring; used in the extended sense of pertaining to the [ring-shaped] cartilage that forms the back and lower part of the laryngeal cavity)
(Greek: crystal, ice, freeze, congeal, frost; icelike, transparent; [especially in reference to a mineral or glass])
(Latin: to lie [in a horizontal position or posture]; to lie down, to lie asleep)
(Greek > Latin: roller, roller-shaped figure; used in the sense of being "roller-shaped, column-shaped")
(Greek: sac or bladder which contains fluid [or gas, as in pneumatocyst]; urinary bladder)
(Greek: cells, cell, hollow; used primarily in the extended sense of "animal or plant cells" [because cells were originally thought to be hollow])
(Greek: tear, tears; as from a tear-gland or the tear-glands in the eyes)
(Latin: from, away from, off; down; wholly, entirely, utterly, complete; reverse the action of, undo; the negation or reversal of the notion expressed in the primary or root word)
(Greek: ten; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Latin: ten; also, a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Just two of many lexicons that need to clarify all of the word contents for a better understanding instead of using another form of one of the words that is being defined to explain the other entries or simply not providing any information about the other words besides the primary entry.)
(Greek: two; second [in a series])
(enjoying words with special points of view, sometimes humorous, and which are not found in a "regular" dictionary)
(Latin: separation, apart, asunder; removal, away, from; negation, deprivation, undoing, reversal, utterly, completely; in different directions)
(Greek > Latin: disk; round plate thrown in athletic competitions; used primarily in the extended sense of "something shaped like a round plate")
(blogging a blog in this blogosphere; or logging a log in this journalsphere)
(Latin: a by-road, a turn away, go in different directions; branching away from)
(Greek: long; used in extended senses as, "abnormally long"; narrow)
(Greek: house, household affairs [environment, habitat], home, dwelling; used in one extensive sense as, "environment")
(Latin: to build, to erect a building; a building, a sanctuary, a temple; originally, aedes, "building a hearth" or "to build a hearth" because the fire in the hearth was the center of the home in early times since it supplied both heat and light; over time, the meaning expanded from the hearth itself to the home and building that enclosed it)
(research and development, the United States in a changing world)
(Greek > Latin: driven on, set in motion; driven, set in motion; ductile; elasticity, elastic)
(Greek > Latin: that which is thrust into something; wedge, stopper; interpolation, obstruction; from "throw in" or "throw into")
(The Celts settled in Britain in about 500 B.C.)
(Under Hadrian, the Romans built a wall to protect themselves from the Picts in Northern Britain)
(Caedmon wrote what became known as "Caedmon's Hymn" in A.D. 657-680)
(The story of Beowulf was a literary work in Old English)
(English was re-established in Britain)
(the English language is viewed as a ticket to the future in Mongolia and other countries)
(retired educators teach English in the Polish countryside)
(Greek ainigma > Latin aenigma: dark saying, riddle, fable; from ainissesthai, "to speak darkly, to speak in riddles")
(Greek: mirror; visible in [a thing]; seen in [something])
(Greek: within, inside, inner; used as a prefix [used in many words related to anatomy and biology])
(Greek: insect, bug; literally, "cut up, cut in pieces"; an insect because it appears to be segmented)
(Greek: daybreak, dawn, red of the dawn sky; primarily used in naming chemical compounds, especially pertaining to red stain or dye)
(Greek: again; occurring in some rhetorical terms)
(Greek: above, over, on, upon; besides; in addition to; toward; among)
(Latin: suffix from -ensis, of, belonging to, from [a place]; originating in [a city or country])
(Greek -issa > Late Latin -issa > Old French -esse > Middle English -esse: a suffix that forms nouns meaning a female +++, as in lioness, tigress, heiress, hostess, and sculptress)
(Greek: upper air, purer air [alcohol and sufuric acid]; in scientific terminology, "volatile, clean-smelling, euphoria-producing liquid composed of alcohol and sufuric acid")
(Greek: -etikos, an adjective suffix meaning "pertaining to, of the nature of" for nouns ending in -esis)
(Latin: a prefix occurring in words of Latin origin used in the senses: out, out of, from; upward; completely, entirely; to remove from, deprive of; without; former [said of previous holders of office or dignity])
(Greek: from hexa-, "six"; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Latin: come forth in abundance, grow luxuriantly; superabundance)
(Latin: to go into exile; to be in exile, banishment)
(Anglo Saxon or Teutonic: in Old English times, eye was eage, which is related to a whole range of words for "eye" in other European languages; including, Greek ophthalmos and Latin oculus [with all of its subsequent derivatives])
(Latin: face, pertaining to the face; countenance; form, make, set in place, do)
(Latin: to speak; utterance, expression, manifestation; expressed in a number of ways)
(Latin: band, bandage; bundle, bunch; used in the extended sense of "pertaining to the fascia", a band or sheet of fibrous tissue providing a subcutaneous covering for various parts of the body)
(Danish and Norwegian: fifteen; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Latin: ward off, to ward off, strike, keep off, guard, protect; from fendere [found only in compounded words])
(Latin: window; in anatomy, a small opening in a bone; to bring to light, to show)
(Latin: strong, hard, solid; steadfast or unwavering in purpose, loyalty, or resolve)
(Latin: to blow, a puff of wind or air; by extension, accumulation of gas in the stomach or bowels)
(Latin: flower; full of flowers, abounding in flowers; flora, plant life, plants of a general region or period)
(Latin: flow, flowing; moving in a continuous and smooth way; wave, moving back and forth)
(Old English: a prefix meaning before in place, rank, or time; in advance)
(Latin: rein, bridle, a bit (as in a horses mouth); by extension, a medical term for a connecting fold of membrane in the body)
(Latin: in vain, in error; to deceive, to disappoint)
(Latin: helmet, helmet shaped, to cover with a helmet; cap; used primarily in zoology and botany with phases of sense development that seem to have been: weasel, weasel's skin or hide, leather, and then a helmet made of leather; by extension, it also means "cat, cats" in some words)
(Named after the Italian physician and physicist who investigated the nature and effects of what he conceived to be electricity in animal tissue; who in 1762 discovered and first described voltaic electricity; electric currents; and primarily, direct electrical current.)
(Greek: Γ, γ; the third letter of the Greek alphabet; corresponding to g, as in go and as a numeral, it indicates 3)
(Greek: an eating, or gnawing, sore ending in mortification, necrosis, or the death of bodily tissue; usually the result of ischemia or the loss of blood supply to the affected area, bacterial invasion, and subsequent putrefaction)
(Latin: a suffix; from agere to set in motion, to drive, to lead; to do, to act)
(Latin: bud, sprout, a growing thing in its early stages)
(Greek: "giant"; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Latin: acorn; in medicine, gland, glans)
(Greek: glue; in medicine, the network of supporting tissue and fibers that nourishes nerve cells within the brain and spinal cord)
(Latin: a round body, a ball; round, a sphere; the earth; "sphere" came from Latin globus, "round mass, sphere"; related to gleba, "clod, soil, land". Sense of "planet earth," or a three-dimensional map of it, appeared first in 1553)
(GPS Defined and Indications of Improvements in Accuracy)
(satellite tracking pygmy elephants in order to learn more about these little pachyderms)
(Latin: glue, sticky substance which remains in flour when the starch is taken out)
(Greek: sweet; used in the specialized sense of "sweet, syrupy liquid")
(Greek: write, writing, something written, a written record, a recording; letters; words; later, a small weight, a unit of mass in the metric system)
(secretly getting access to files on a computer or network in order to get information, to steal private information in order to illegally transfer money, or to cause damage, etc.)
(Greek > Latin: to wander in mind, to dream)
(Greek: something that is wrong; sin, evil behavior; wickedness in living; misconduct; that part of theology that deals with sin or immoral deeds)
(air purification in the home, business, school, and workplace)
(be aware of the effects of oxytocin in nasal sprays)
(Latin: blunt, dull; lethargy, lack of energy or interest in doing things)
(Greek: a hundred; many; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Greek: Hermes, the son of Zeus and Maia, the god of commerce and messenger of the gods in Greek mythology; identified by the Romans as Mercury; however, some of the words in this unit come from Hermes tris megistos, Hermes Trismegistus, literally, "Hermes, Thrice the Greatest" referring to the Egyptian god Thoth, who was identified with the Greek god Hermes, of science and arts)
(Latin: protruded viscus; rupture; in the sense of "protrusion of tissue or part of an organ through an abnormal opening in the surrounding walls")
(Greek: tissue [web]; beam or warp of a loom; hence, that which is woven; a web or tissue; used in the sense of pertaining to [body] tissue)
(Greek: even, level, smooth; used in the sense of "flat" or "plane")
(Greek: same, like, resembling, sharing in common, similar, equal)
(Latin: bristling, rough, roughness; rudeness; shaking, tremble, trembling, shutter; shock; disgust, hatred; resulting in horror, horrid, etc.)
(Greek: from ancient Greek hormáein [hormein], "to set in motion, impel, urge on")
(Greek: to rouse or to set in motion)
(Greek: health, healthy, healthful, wholesome, sound [in body])
(Greek: above, over; excessive; more than normal; abnormal excess [in medicine]; abnormally great or powerful sensation [in physical or pathological terms]; highest [in chemical compounds])
(Greek > Latin: together, in one, as a single word)
(a normal behavior when induced in most “normal people” under suitable conditions)
(Latin: suffix form of -an from -ianus, a modifier of the main word to which it is attached: belonging to, coming from, being involved in, or being like something)
(Greek: a suffix; pertaining to; of the nature of, like; in chemistry, it denotes a higher valence of the element than is expressed by -ous)
(Greek: fluid [distinct from blood] that flows through the veins of the gods; by extension, "watery part of blood or milk," used in the sense of "thin, serous or sanious fluid, especially from a wound or sore")
(Greek: a suffix; meaning, specialist in, practitioner of)
(Greek: a suffix used to form the names of families in zoology and biology; descended from, related to)
(Creativity is achieved by focusing and striving with one's chosen objective regardless of what others say or have done! In essence, it is a conception and the completion of the chosen vision.)
(Latin: no, not [ig-, il-, im-, ir-])
(Latin: belonging to a country; born in a country; native to a geographical area)
(Greek: force, strength; seat of strength; muscle, sinew; fibrous vessel in a muscle)
(Latin: island; derived from insul[a], "island" [used here in reference to the islands [islets] of Langerhans, irregular structures in the pancreas that produce the protein hormone insulin which is secreted into the blood where it regulates sugar metabolism])
(Latin: a suffix; to act in a certain way; to treat in a certain way; to make into; to treat with; to do; to make; to cause)
(Greek, ismos; Latin, ismus: a suffix: belief in, practice of, condition of, process, characteristic behavior or manner, abnormal state, distinctive feature or trait)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; one who believes in; one who is engaged in; someone who does something)
(Latin: a suffix; to act in a certain way; to treat in a certain way; to make into; to treat with; to do; to make; to cause)
(Latin: the fasting [intestine], the portion of the small intestine between the duodenum and the ileum [so named because early anatomists typically found this organ to be empty in dissection]; original meaning, "hungry, not partaking of food")
(Latin: link, unite, yoke; bring together, meet, merge, engage in; combine)
(Greek: one thousand; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements and representing 103 or 1 000)
(signs given in the arenas of Rome and now in our modern times)
(a slip of the tongue, a mistake in uttering a word, an imprudent word inadvertently spoken; as expressed by public personalities in this series of articles)
(Latin: insect in its grub stage; from Latin larva, "mask" and by extension, "ghost", the idea being that an insect in its grub stage is merely a ghost of its future self and bears no resemblance to its future form)
(The Importance of Latin in the English Language)
(Latin-Roman Numerals that are used in English and other modern languages)
(Latin words directly incorporated into English which are essentially without changes from their original spelling)
(Greek: thin, small, fine, delicate, mild; from "peeled, husked"; used primarily in the sense of "abnormally thin, narrow, slender, or delicate")
(Latin: light in weight, lightness; to raise, to rise, to lift)
(the way they were in ancient times and are in the present and potentials for the future)
(Deep-sea animals have made attempts to light their cold and dark environments by carrying their own lights on their heads and on every other conceivable part of the bodies; including their eyes and tails and the insides of their mouths. The light they shed is living light.)
(Greek: talk, speak; speech; word; a person who speaks in a certain manner; someone who deals with topics or subjects)
(Greek: large, great; long [in extent or duration]; enlarged, or elongated, long [in length]; abnormally large)
(Latin: to soften, softening; to mollify; a kneading movement used in massage; stroking, caressing, love play)
(Latin: mantellum, cloak, veil; by way of Middle English, from Old English mentel and from Old French mantel; resulting in English words about: mantle, mantel, and manteau)
(Greek: derived from an ancient villiage in Greece, northeast of Athens; as a result of an important Greek victory over the Persians in 490 B.C.)
(Greek: breast; the front of the human chest and either of two soft rounded organs on each side of the chest in women and men; however, with women the organs are more prominent and produce milk after childbirth; also, a milk-producing gland in mammals that corresponds to the human breast)
(Greek: breast; used in the specialized sense as "of or pertaining to the breast-shaped mastoid process of the temporal bone)
(Latin: opening or passageway in the body, bodily opening or canal; to go, to pass, passage)
(Memories of Experiences while Living and Traveling in Many Parts of the World)
(other writers join the bandwagon in revealing fake entries in book)
(a memoir contained in the Introduction of his book)
(Greek: after, behind, beyond; changed in form, altered; higher [used to designate a higher degree of a branch of science])
(Greek: upraised, high up; in the air; anything raised from the ground, high, lofty; hovering in the air; hence, "heavenly body, atmospheric phenomenon")
(Greek: a combining form occurring in the names of chemical compounds in which the methyl group is present; alcohol, wine)
(Greek: small, tiny; also, a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Latin: thousand; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements; including, thousandth, thousandths)
(Latin: move, moving, to set in motion)
(other languages expressing the words mosquito, mosquitoes as shown in Latinized-text format)
(Latin: musum, "muzzle, snout"; Old French muser "to meditate, to ponder", perhaps literally "to go around with one's nose in the air" from muse "muzzle, snout")
(Latin > French: done in exchange; reciprocal; with the same feelings or relationships; shared by two people or groups, in common with each other)
(Greek: mucus; a protective secretion from the mucous membranes in the nose, throat, and lungs; a thick fluid produced by the linings of some tissues of the body and is secreted as a protective lubricant coating by cells and glands of the mucous membranes)
(Greek: lipoid substance (containing or resembling fat) sheathing certain nerve fibers; lipoid substance found in body tissue)
(Greek > Latin: membrane, tympanic [drum] membranes in the ears)
(Greek: slime, mucus; used often in biomedical nomenclature)
(Greek: dwarf, dwarfish; pygmy; "little old man;" very small or tiny; also, a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(varied potential advancements in nanotechnology innovations)
(Greek: thread, that which is spun; pertaining to a thread-like structure used in many scientific terms)
(Greek: goddess of victory in Greek mythology; literally, victory)
(A noisy silence in the waters of the oceans and the seas)
(Greek > Latin > French: the tree Olea europaea, used in its etymological sense)
(Greek: a suffix meaning: to talk, to speak; a branch of knowledge; any science or academic field that ends in -ology which is a variant of -logy; a person who speaks in a certain manner; someone who deals with certain topics or subjects)
(Olympia, a place in Greece in the western Peloponnese, scene of the Olympic games)
(Greek: rain, rainstorm; showers of rain; aqueous vapor in the atmosphere; precipitation or falling down from the sky of a form of water; such as, rain, snow, hail, sleet, or mist)
(Latin: foreboding; anything perceived or happening that is believed to portend or to suggest that something is going to happen which may be a good or an evil event or circumstance in the future)
(Greek: said to be a stem for "all, every, whole", or "complete"; that is, a field of study in biology that refers to the whole set of omics including their -omics and -ome subfields in order to understand life as a holistic existence and organic beings as a whole)
(Greek: egg or eggs; used in an extended sense as the ovum)
(Latin: rut or track made in the ground by a wheel; circle, ring, round surface, disk)
(Latin: order, in order; in a row, regular series, class, rank)
(Greek > Latin > French: excitement or violent action in an organ or part)
(Latin: a suffix of adjectives ending in -ory; of or relating to; like; resembling)
(Latin: full of, abounding in, having the qualities of, characteristic of something)
(Latin: full of or having the qualities of; in chemistry, a suffix denoting that the element indicated by the name bearing it, has a valence lower than that denoted by the termination -ic; as, nitrous, sulphurous, etc., as contrasted with nitric, sulphuric, etc.)
(Greek: to smell; stink; generally used in a bad sense)
(Greek: a "peak", but used by ecologists in the restricted sense of "foothill")
(Latin: marked with the palm of the hand; adorned with palm leaves; used primarily in the sense of "having five lobes that diverge from a common center" [as fingers from an open palm])
(Latin: poppy; used in extended senses to mean "pertaining to, containing, or derived from opium")
(Greek: papyros > Latin > Old French; papyrus, an Egyptian rush [a reed plant] from which material was made for writing or drawing. Used in the sense of "fibrous material on which to write or to draw"; paper)
(Latin: to make ready, to get ready, to put in order; to furnish, to prepare)
(Latin: to come forth, to be visible, to come in sight)
(Latin: wall [of a house], walls; used in the extended sense of "the walls of a cavity or organ of the body")
(Latin: cattle, property in cattle; private property; money; particular)
(Latin: foot, feet; people often see this ped element in other words. When people refer to "pedal extremities", they mean "feet". When anyone pushes the pedals of a bicycle, it is done with the feet. A pedestrian must use the feet for walking. A quadruped has four feet while a centipede has "100 feet"; or a large number of them because it may be impossible to count all of them.)
(Latin: worse; diminish, weaken; inferior in quality or condition)
(Latin: hang, hanging; weigh, weighing; to cause to hang down; related to words in this pond- unit.)
(Greek > Modern Latin: abnormal reduction, decrease in, insufficient, deficiency. Originally, the meaning was poverty, need; sometimes it is erroneously or incorrectly rendered as -poenia)
(Latin: feather, feathers; by extension in some situations, wing, wings)
(Greek: mother-in-law; father-in-law)
(Latin: human being; originally, character in a drama, mask)
(Greek: derived from penta-, "five"; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Greek: in botany, a suffix combining form meaning, "having a certain number or a certain shape of petals")
(Greek via Latin: bone between two joints of a finger or toe; line of battle; from phalanx, heavy infantry in close order [from Greek antiquity])
(Greek: breath, wind; pertaining to air or gas; bellows, bladder, bubble; swollen; as seen in many modern scientific terms)
(Greek: a plant; growth; growing in a specified way or place; to produce)
(Italian: very small or from Spanish, "beak, tip, very small"; and from Latin, beccus, beak; also, a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(passively drifting and wandering in the sky)
(importance of plankton in marine life)
(Latin: to clap, to strike, to beat; to clap the hands in approbation [recognition as good], to approve)
(Greek: stroke, wound; used in medicine to denote "a condition resulting from a stroke")
(two roads diverged or separated and went in different directions according to Robert Frost)
(an abnormal way of getting warm in the freezing conditions of a Canadian winter as expressed by Robert Service)
(thinking that you can be successful in achieving an objective is a vital mental condition, but thinking that you can not do it is almost a guarantee that you will not be successful as indicated by Walter Wintle)
(marriage comes in a variety of formats)
(Greek > Latin: skilled in the law; busy, skilled in business; a thing done; to do, effect, accomplish, practice)
(Latin: before [both in time and place])
(Latin: individual; not in public life; apart from the State; belonging to an individual)
(Greek > Latin: a prefix signifying before; forward, forth; for, in favor of; in front of; in place of, on behalf of; according to; as, to place before; to go before or forward, to throw forward)
(Egyptian schools for scribes prepared students so they could have the economic advantages of those who worked in this profession)
(Greek: one who stands before, in front of; refers primarily to the prostate gland [so named because it "stands before" the mouth of the bladder])
(Greek: stammering; faltering in speech)
(a disease of the skin in which raised, rough, reddened areas appear, covered with fine silvery scales which cause aggravation)
(Greek: a person who crouches; than extended to a beggar, poor; paupers; modernized meanings: street people, homeless, vagrant, living in poverty)
(sections which are available in this series about reasons for publishing)
(Latin: flesh, meat, fleshy parts of the body; fruit pulp; used mostly in reference to the tissue that exists in a tooth)
(Latin: appearing as if, as it were, as though; somewhat like, resembling, seemingly; simulating; in a certain sense or degree)
(seeing is believing; even if some things have to be believed in order to be seen)
(slip-ups, goofs, flubs, and other blunders in many areas of communication; examples of incompetence and incongruity)
(slip-ups, goofs, flubs, and other blunders in many areas of communication; examples of language incompetence)
(slip-ups, goofs, flubs, and other blunders in many areas of communication; examples of language incompetence)
(situation in which less and less is done by more and more officials; government agency where after all is said and done, more is said than done)
(establishments that often forget that in “business”, the "u" comes before the "i")
(something that comes in two basic gender formats, but in billions of shapes and forms)
(just because we were born that way is no justification for staying in such a condition)
(information and viewpoints that are constantly shifting courses in the midst of ever-changing news; knowing which perspectives to put into and what to keep out of a newspaper)
(a condition in which the more we know, the more we know that we don't know)
(EU, Languages Stretch the Limits; as European Union seeks a stronger voice, words get in the way)
(failure in life takes place when we live and fail to learn; what we don't know, we can learn)
(speaking a foreign language in English; the inability to tell what a person does not mean until he/she has spoken)
(only thing that keeps your credit card in good standing)
(consider the postage stamp: its usefulness consists in the ability to stick to one thing until it gets there)
(a field in which scientists try to prolong the lives of people so they will have time to pay for the gadgets that are invented for them)
(something that may not be golden, but is worth its weight in gold and which can't be misquoted)
(a situation in which one does not have to remember what was said previously)
(a nation that utilizes automation and technology, but which is depending more and more on outsourcing to other nations for the experts in those areas)
(some of the of terms used in RFID technology)
(RFID is being extended in NATO)
(bill is proposed in New Hampshire, U.S., to place limits on RFID applications)
(Latin: reciprocus, turning back the same way, alternating; turning backward and forward; to give, to do, to feel, or to show in return)
(Latin: make right, adjust, remedy; make straight; to lead, put in a straight line; to rule)
(millions of photoreceptor cells residing in the human retina gather light and transmit signals to the brain)
(Greek: suture, stitching, joining in a seam)
(Greek: that which may be turned or spun around; magician's circle; equilateral parallelogram in which only the opposite angles are equal)
(A Special Publication for Logophiles (YOU?) and for Those Who Want a Handy Reference to Latin-Greek Elements Used in English-Derived Words)
(Latin numbers as cardinals, "quantities"; and as ordinals, "showing order" or "designating a place in an ordered sequence")
(historical perspectives for a better understanding of Roman events in their arenas)
(words which identify Roman terms referring to people and other topics; especially, those appearing in Those about to Die)
(Latin: to chew over again, to chew the cud; to muse or to meditate; that is, to think about something in a deep and serious or dreamy and abstracted way or to think about something carefully, calmly, seriously, and for a long time)
(Latin: country, farm, land, open land; of the country, simple; living in the country)
(Latin: spittle, the fluid secreted in the mouth)
(Salt runs through our language, our history, and our veins!)
(Latin: healthy, whole; by extension: cure, heal, take care of; sound in mind and body)
(Latin: poetic medley, satire: the use of irony, sarcasm, or ridicule in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice, folly, etc.)
(Latin: the flat, triangular bone in the back of the shoulder; the shoulder blade)
(Latin: from Medieval Latin sciatica, in sciatica passio, "sciatic disease", from feminine of sciaticus, "sciatic"; from Latin ischiadicus, "of pain in the hip"; from Greek iskhiadikos, iskhias, iskhiados, "pain in the hips"; from iskhion, "hip joint".)
(international students in scientific areas of study need to possess a solid grasp of English to succeed as scientists or even to lay claim to being scientifically literate citizens of the world)
(international students in scientific areas of study need to possess a solid grasp of English to succeed as scientists or even to lay claim to being scientifically literate citizens of the world)
(lists of careers in science with short descriptions)
(Latin: pertaining to, or having scurvy [a disease resulting from a deficiency of vitamin C in the body, characterized by weakness, anemia, spongy gums, bleeding from the mucous membranes, etc.])
(a classical example of phobias in famous art work)
(Latin: borrowed from Old French saison, seison, "a sowing, planting", from Latin sationem, "a sowing"; in Vulgar Latin, "time of sowing, seeding time")
(Latin: from Old French seculer; from Late Latin sæcularis, worldly, living in the world, not belonging to a religious order; from saecularis, pertaining to a generation or age; from saeculum, saeclum, period of a man's life, generation; period of a hundred years)
(advances in seismic-imaging computers are finding more energy sources)
(Latin: a partition; a dividing wall between two spaces, tissues, or cavities; from saepire "to enclose, to hedge in", and from saepes, "fence, hedge")
(Latin: a speaking, talking, delivering religious messages; literally, "that which is put together in a certain order")
(Latin: serum, whey; watery substance; serum, in connection with serum)
(Latin: scrinium, a case, chest, box, or receptacle; especially, one in which are deposited sacred relics, bones of a saint, or sacred books and documents)
(Greek: sigmoeides, shaped like the letter sigma; pertaining to the sigmoid flexure, the S-shaped bend in the colon; a combining form that usually denotes the sigmoid colon)
(slavery not only existed in the past, but it still exists in parts of the present world)
(Latin: to suck in, to swallow; to take in)
(as seen in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, 1599, we have this famous speech)
(Greek: entrails, intestines, viscera [internal organs collectively; especially, those in the abdominal cavity])
(Latin > French: to seek amusement, literally, "to carry oneself in the opposite direction")
(Greek: bunch of grapes, uvula [that which resembles a grape hanging from a stock]; staphylococci, grape-shaped bacteria occurring in irregular clusters)
(Latin: standing, to stay, to make firm, fixed; cause to stand, to put, to place, to put in place, to remain in place; to stand still)
(a secretly hidden coding that dates back to ancient Greece and is used even in this modern era)
(Greek: Greek herald in the Trojan war [Greek mythology]; powerful voice [literally, "groaner, roarer"])
(Latin: suavis, "sweet"; suadere, "to advise"; "to make something pleasant to, to present in a pleasing manner"; hence "to recommend, to advise")
(Latin: under, below, beneath; used as a prefix as shown in various formats below)
("Virgin suicides" forced on young women in Turkey)
(Latin: talis, "such like" or "such"; talio, "punishment equal in severity to the wrong that occasioned it" or "exaction of payment or payment in kind")
(Latin: at length; in the sense of "lengthwise, one behind the other")
(Greek > Latin: ankle, tarsal plate of the eyelid; from Greek tarsos, frame of wickerwork; broad, flat surface, as also in tarsos podos, the flat of the foot, instep of the foot; the edge of the eyelid)
(Latin > French: device for calculating a distance traveled (in a vehicle for hire) and the corresponding fare is charged)
(Greek: arrangement, order, put in order, orientation; the movements or directed responses of motile organisms to stimuli, as indicated by the combining roots)
(advances in computers, entertainment, and science top list of tech breakthroughs)
(Greek > Latin: to move in a certain direction; to stretch, to hold out; tension; as well as tendon, sinew)
(Greek: tendon, sinew [related to "move in a certain direction, stretch"])
(Greek: "monster, marvel"; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Latin: a witness, one who stands by; from testicle, one of the two oval male gonads supported in the scrotum by its tissues and suspended by the spermatic cord)
(Greek > Latin: inner room, bedchamber; so called by Galen because chambers at the base of the brain were thought to supply animal spirits to the optic nerves; thalamus, the middle part of the diencephalon (the area in the center of the brain just above the brain stem that includes the thalamus and hypothalamus) which relays sensory impulses to the cerebral cortex of the brain)
(Latin: titulus; inscription on a tomb or altar; a label, a heading in a book or other composition)
(Latin: toile to toilette in Middle French)
(Latin: toile to toilette in Middle French)
(Latin: toile to toilette in Middle French to "toilet" in English)
(Latin: toile to toilette in Middle French to "toilet" in English)
(an excess of nutrients flowing from the land to the sea has created serious environment problems)
(an excess of nutrients flowing from the land to the sea has created serious environmental problems)
(an excess of nutrients flowing from the land to the sea has created serious environmental problems)
(an excess of nutrients flowing from the land to the sea has created serious environmental problems)
(once considered in poor taste; the joke was not nearly as vulgar as those that are currently expressed on many U.S. TV shows)
(Greek > Latin: a peculiarity in language or special presentations)
(the "tongue" term may be applied to both a body part in the mouth and an extensive reference to "language")
(Latin: to assign, to allot, to bestow, to give, to grant; from tribe, to give out among the tribes was tribuere which is the source of many of the words located in this unit)
(Greek > Latin: cave; thriving in caves; cave dweller)
(Greek: a suffix referring to a device, tool, or instrument; more generally, used in the names of any kind of chamber or apparatus used in experiments)
(Greek: to smoke; smoke, mist, vapor, hot vapor, steam, cloud, fog; stupor [insensibility, numbness, dullness]; used exclusively in medicine as a reference to fever accompanied by stupor or a clouding of the mind resulting from the fever caused by a severe-infectious disease)
(Greek: heaven [s], vault of heaven; hence "the sky"; from Uranus, the god of the sky; in medicine, the palate, roof, or top of the mouth)
(Latin: womb; hollow, muscular organ of the female reproductive system in which the fertilized ovum, or egg, and the fetus, unborn baby, is nourished and grows until birth)
(Latin: originally, "sheath, scabbard, the husk of grain"; in medical science, the vagina or lowest part of the female genital tract, the canal that leads from the vulva to the uterus)
(Latin: a doorlike structure in a passageway that hinders or prevents the reflux or flowing back of its contents)
(from Latin vates, seer, prophet; sooth-sayer; prophesy, prophecy; which should not be confused with Vatican, "Pope's palace in Rome" or Vaticanism, "doctrine of papal supremacy and infallibility")
(Latin: animating, enlivening; vigorous, vigor, active; to be alive, activity, to quicken; then a quickening action of growing; a specific sense of "plant cultivated for food, edible herb, or root" is first recorded in 1767; the differences between the meanings from its original links with "life, liveliness" was completed in the early twentieth century, when vegetable came to be used for an "inactive person".)
(Latin: stand in awe of, to be awed at; wonder or admiration of; dread mixed with veneration or great respect)
(Latin > Italian: a person skilled in one of the fine arts, especially in music)
(Latin: internal organs; all that is under the skin, all parts in the body except flesh or muscles; entrails; any large interior organ in any of the three great cavities of the body; specifically, those within the chest; such as, the heart or lungs; or in the abdomen; such as, the liver, pancreas, and intestines; and in the head; such as, the brain)
(seeing English words in three vocabulary quiz types from different perspectives for a greater enhancement of English-word skills)
(unit of measurement of electromotive force, or pressure, in an electrical circuit, or 'push', named for Alessandro Volta (1745-1827) renowned for his pioneering work in electricity)
(the vulture is near extinction in India)
(The translation of the story with the interpretations of the right answers in parentheses)
(Greek: from octo-, "eight"; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Greek: from octo-, "eight"; a decimal prefix used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Latin: septo-, seven; a decimal prefix [10-21] used in the international metric system for measurements)
(Latin: septo-, "seven"; a decimal prefix [1021] used in the international metric system for measurements)
(origin and background of the study of animals in motion)
Word Entries containing the term: “in
A boiled egg in the morning is hard to beat.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A man's home is his castle, in a manor of speaking.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
a spe in spem
From hope to hope.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 2)
Abeunt studia in mores.
Translation: "Studies change into habits."

A maxim by Ovid: "Pursuits done with constant and careful attention become habits."

Abi in pace.
Depart in peace.

A variant of Vade in pace. or "Go in peace."

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 4) pac-, peac-, peas- (page 1)
Adeo in teneris consuescere multum est.
So important is it to grow inured to anything in early youth.

There is a value of instilling sound principles in the mind during the early years.

So imperative it is to form habits in early years.
—Vergil
'Tis education forms the common mind;
Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclined.
—Alexander Pope (English poet and satirist; 1688-1744), in his Moral Essays.
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 11) multi-, mult- (page 1)
Aequam memento rebus in arduis servare mentem. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Remember to maintain a clear head when attempting difficult tasks."
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 12) memor-, memen- (page 1)
Aliena vitia in oculis habemus; a tergo nostra sunt.
Another's faults are before our eyes; our own [faults] are behind us.

Expressed by Seneca, in his writing titled, On Anger.

Aliquis in omnibus, nullus in singulis.
A somebody in general, a nobody in particular.

Another version is, "A jack-of-all-trades, master of none." A description of someone who may have several general skills, or areas of knowledge, but who is not an expert in any of them.

Altiora in votis.
I pray for the higher things.

Motto of Highgate School, U.K.

A.M. in the morning
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 2)
Amicus certus in re incerta cernitur.
A friend in need is a friend indeed.

From Quintus Ennius (239 - 169 B.C.). He served in the Roman army as a centurion during the Second Punic War. Cato brought him to Rome, and he became a Roman citizen in 184. B.C.

He wrote tragedies and comedies adapted from the Greek, satires, epigrams, a didactic poem on nature, a poem on mythology, a poem on Scipio's victory over Hannibal, and the Annals, a history of Rome in eighteen books.

This entry is located in the following units: ami-, amic- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 15)
An acre is someone who is in pain.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
An adult is someone who has stopped growing at both ends and is now growing in the middle.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
an anachronism in his own time *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 2)
Ancestors or Latin origins of words in English (carpet, scarce, excerpt):
It appears to be impossible that such far-flung words as carpet, scarce, and excerpt all come from the same Latin verb; however, they do, and their histories show the astonishing and unpredictable way some words have developed.

The word carpet, for example, ultimately derives from the Latin carpo, which meant to "pluck" or to "card" wool, and it is believed that the first carpets were of wooly cloth made of unravelled threads.

Then there is the term scarce, which English inherited from the French escars, "scanty", originally from the Latin ex, "out", and carpo, "pluck". It's like "plucking" from the cookie jar until the cookies become "scanty" and scarce.

Another related word is excerpt, from Latin excerptus (ex, "out" and carpo, "pluck") which refers to something that has been "plucked out" of its context.

The result is that the idea of "plucking" streams through the three widely divergent words just as a scarce thread of color can be woven through the carpet with which this excerpt started.

These basic words and their related forms can be seen in this carpo-, carp- (cerp-) unit of "to pluck, to pick out, to gather, to select" words.

This entry is located in the following unit: carpo-, carp- (cerp-) + (page 1)
And in a voice that rang he answered
“No!”
anguis in herba
A snake in the grass.

A traitor or disloyal friend; an unsuspected danger.

This entry is located in the following units: angui- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 15)
at this point in time
"At this time"; or "At this point" is more than adequate and is preferable!
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 3)
Bear in the Sky
As one goes north from the equator, the stars of the northern sky seem to climb higher in the sky. Eventually, the most prominent constellation of the northern sky, the "Big Dipper" or "Great Bear" would be overhead at some time of the night.

The Greeks referred to the north as the arctic, from arktos, or "bear". It was the region where the "bear" was overhead. The "Great Bear" is known to modern astronomers by the Latin name Ursa Major.

This entry is located in the following unit: arcto-, arct- + (page 3)
Biology is the study of anything that comes in twos.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Biometrics: Benefits of Biometrics in Controlling Access
A biometric tool that measures bodily features for better security.
Biometrics: Important Role in Physical Access Control
A biometric tool that is important for physical-access control.
Biopiracy: In the News
Resources from Kenyan Lake Bogoria is a current biopiracy issue.
Calicem vitae dedisti mihi in mortem.
The cup of life is the cup of death.

Motto of German Emperor Henry VII of Luxembourg (1308-1313).

Child labor in Guatemala

Children are forced to work very early in their lives

  • Guatemalan children shine shoes and make bricks, many starting as early as five or six years of age.
  • They cut cane and mop floors; and at some factories exporting to the United States, they sew and sort and chop, often in conditions so onerous that they violate even Guatemala's very loose labor laws.
  • Guatemala's young workers, most of them poor indigenous people, say they often feel that nobody cares about them, not their parents who send them off to the work force, not their stern bosses who treat them like adults, and not even the dysfunctional government in Guatemala City.
  • Guatemalan work-places resemble grade schools, with adult supervisors standing over little laborers like the strictest of teachers.
  • According to an independent study of the issue, an estimated one million Guatemalan children under the age of 18 are working.

One child worker's testimony

The child workers are people like Maria, 16, who lamented her four years in the labor force, but at the same time insisted that she not be fully identified so as not to endanger a job that is helping to support her parents and four brothers and sisters.

  • "My father hits me and tells me I can't study," she said, tears running down her cheeks. "He stays home and drinks and I have to go to the factory."
  • On Sundays, her only day off, she goes to special classes for young laborers offered by the Center for Study and Support for Local Development.
  • Despite having worked at a factory since she was twelve and at home for years before that, Maria has now completed the equivalent of third grade.
  • "I can be so tired, so exhausted, but I feel so good when I come home and read," she said, her tears stopping and her face lighting up.
  • "It can be any book. I just like to see the words."
—Excerpts from "Plight of child workers puts Guatemala in bind"
by Marc Lacey; IHT; March 12, 2007; pages 1 & 5.
This entry is located in the following unit: labor-, laborat- + (page 1)
competition in biology
A relationship between members of the same or different species in which individuals are adversely affected by those having the same living requirements; such as, food or space.

Intraspecific competition; for example, competition among members of the same species, is shown by some species of birds and mammals, the males of which set up territories from which all other males of the same species are excluded.

With interspecific competition, members of different species compete for the same ecologically limiting factors; such as, a food source.

This entry is located in the following unit: peti-, pet-, -pit- (page 2)
competition in economics
Rivalry in supplying or acquiring economic services or goods.

Sellers compete with other sales people, and buyers with other buyers and in its perfect form, there is competition among many small buyers and sellers, none of whom is too large to affect the market as a whole.

Competition is often reduced by many limitations, including copyrights, patents, and governmental regulations; such as, fair-trade laws, minimum wage laws, and wage and price controls.

This entry is located in the following unit: peti-, pet-, -pit- (page 2)
Completed Units in Word Info that have been Enhanced
This entry is located in the following unit: Completed Units of Words and Special Compositions about Words (page 1)
consecutive extra points in a row *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 6)
Constanter in ardua.
With constancy against difficulties.

A motto of perseverance and steadfastness.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 4)
constantia in ardua
By perseverance against difficulty.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 4)
Cum dubia in certis versetur vita pericli pro lucro tibi pone diem quicumque sequetur.
Since our frail life through dangers sure must run, count every day that comes as something won.

Cato (c. 234-149 B.C.), called "the Censor" or "the Elder", to distinguish him from the later Catos, was consul in 195 B.C., and censor in 184. In the latter office he tried to reform Roman morals, sparing no one and banning foreign habits and customs.

This entry is located in the following units: cum (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 6)
De die in diem. (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From day to day."
This entry is located in the following units: de- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 1)
Dirige, Domine, Deus meus, in conspectu tuo viam meam.
Translation: "Direct, O Lord, my God, my way in thy sight."

Old Testament Bible, Psalm 5:9.

Eggs are the only food that comes naturally in no deposit, no-return, and in bio-degradable packaging.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Egotist: someone who is usually me-deep in conversation.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Faenum habet in cornu, longe fuge.
He has hay on his horn, beware of him.

A Latin idiom: The Romans were wary of bulls who gored haystacks. The proverb warns against the man who exhibits taurine traits.

This entry is located in the following units: corn- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group F (page 1)
feces in the news, Enviropig

A genetically engineered pig, labeled Enviropig, was recently approved for limited production in Canada because it makes urine and feces that contains up to sixty-five percent less phosphorous, Canadian officials have announced.

—From "Gene-Altered 'Enviropig' to Reduce Dead Zones?"
"Pigs modified to excrete less phosphorus win limited approval in Canada"
by Anne Minard for National Geographic News;
Published, March 30, 2010.
This entry is located in the following unit: feco-, fec-, faeco-, faec-, feci- + (page 2)
feces in the news, having no toilets harming billions of people

A lack of toilets is severely jeopardizing the health of 2.6 billion people in the developing world who are forced to discard their excrement, or feces, in bags, buckets, fields, and ditches.

"The lack of a safe, private, and convenient toilet is a daily source of indignity and undermines health, education, and income generation," according to Beyond Scarcity: Power, Poverty, and the Global Water Crisis, a report commissioned by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Much of Europe and North America built sanitation systems in the 1800s to keep humans and their drinking water away from pathogen-bearing fecal matter that can transmit cholera, diarrhea, typhoid, and parasites.

Nearly every other person in the developing world today lacks access to improved sanitation, and 1.1 billion people, one-sixth of the world's population, get their water from sources contaminated by human and animal feces, the report says.

—From "Lack of Toilets Harming Health of Billions, UN Report Says"
by Kelly Hearn for National Geographic News;
Published, November 15, 2006.
This entry is located in the following unit: feco-, fec-, faeco-, faec-, feci- + (page 2)
feces in the news, human feces used by many farmers in the world

Irrigation is the primary agricultural use of human waste in the developing world; however, frequently untreated human feces harvested from latrines is delivered to farms and spread as fertilizer.

Facing water shortages and escalating fertilizer costs, farmers in developing countries are using raw sewage to irrigate and fertilize nearly forty-nine million acres (20 million hectares) of cropland.

—From "Human Waste Used by 200 Million Farmers"
by Tasha Eichenseher in Stockholm, Sweden;
for National Geographic News; Published, August 21, 2008.
This entry is located in the following unit: feco-, fec-, faeco-, faec-, feci- + (page 2)
fetus in fetu, fetus-in-fetu
A fetus-in-fetu is an encapsulated, pedunculated vertebrate tumor.

This is a situation in which one twin fails to develop past the fetal stage and is completely subsumed into the body of the other. Generally, it's fetus in fetu if the fetus develops a reasonable skeleton, but sometimes there are just bits and pieces of fetus bodies that are subsumed into otherwise healthy babies.

Fetus in fetu is a surgico pathological curiosity, wherein a vertebrate fetus is included within the abdomen of its partner. Masses containing bones, cartilage, teeth, central nervous system tissue, fat and muscle may be found in the abdomen of newborns and children termed Teratomas. They are defined as fetus in fetu if there is a recognized trunk and limbs, seemingly an abortive twinning.

Another description states that fetus in fetu (or foetus in foeto) describes an extremely rare abnormality that involves a fetus getting trapped inside its twin. It continues to survive as a parasite even past birth by forming an umbilical cord-like structure that leeches its twin's blood supply until it grows so large that it starts to harm the host, at which point doctors usually intervene.

Invariably the parasitic fetus is anencephalic (without a brain) and lacks internal organs, and as such is unable to survive on its own, though it may have almost human (albeit underdeveloped and bizarre) features such as limbs, digits, hair, nails and teeth.

Fetus in fetu was coined by Johann Friedrich Meckel in the early nineteenth century. It is an extremely rare condition estimated to occur once in 500,000 deliveries.

This entry is located in the following unit: feto-, fet-, feti-, foeto-, foet- + (page 2)
Fures privatorum in nervo ataque in compentibus aetatem agunt; fures publici in auro ataque in purpura.
Those who steal from private individuals spend their lives in stocks and chains; those who steal from the pubic treasure go dressed in gold and purple.
—Marcus Porcius Cato (234-149.B.C.)
Gloria in facto (s), Gloria in factis (pl)
Latin: Glory through deed, Glory through deeds.

"A deed is an act or acts that are carried out or completed: "James performed a great deed when he helped Lamont prepare for his final exams at the university."

This entry is located in the following unit: glori-, glor- + (page 1)
Going to church doesn't make a person a Christian, any more than standing in a garage makes him or her a car.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
Imperium in imperio. (Latin motto)
Translation: "An empire within an empire."

An early motto of the State of Ohio (1866-1868), USA.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 1) par-, para- (page 2)
in absentia
In [one's] absence.

Pronounced in Latin as [in ahb SEN tee uh] but in English as [in ab SEN shuh]. One may be awarded a university degree in absentia or be convicted of a crime in absentia; in the former case because of the inability of someone to appear for the academic ceremony, in the latter because somebody is beyond the reach of the law by being in another country or whose location is unknown.

in aeternum
Forever.
In alio pediculum, in te ricinum non vides.
You see a louse on someone else, but not a tick on yourself.
—Petronius Arbiter

Petronius (c. 27-66 A.D.) was a Roman courtier, satirist writer, and credited with writing the Satyricon (Tales of Satyrs); a long satirical romance in prose and verse of which only parts of the 15th and 16th books, in a fragmentary state, still survive.

—Excerpts from Chambers Biographical Dictionary,
Chambers Harrap Publishers, Ltd.; Edinburg, 1997.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 2)
in articulo mortis
In the grasp of death or at the moment of death.

A statement made in articulo mortis, "at the point of death", carries special weight; since it is believed that a person about to die has nothing to gain, perhaps much to lose, by lying.

In bono vince.
Conquer by good.

Motto of St. Lawrence College, Ramsgate, U.K.

in camera
In a chamber.

Current meaning is "in private" which is applied especially to a hearing held by a judge in her/his chambers, or in an office, with the public and the press excluded. A judge's chambers [singular] is his/her private office for discussing cases or legal matters not taken up in open court.

This entry is located in the following units: camer- + (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 2)
In Christo fratres.
Brothers in Christ.

Motto of Tonbridge School, U.K.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 2)
In democracy, your vote counts; while in feudalism, your count votes.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
In Deo speramus.
We trust in God.

Motto of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. It is also translated as, "In God we trust."

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 2)
in excelsis
In the highest.
This entry is located in the following units: cell-, cel- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 2)
in extenso
In full.

An unabridged text is given in extenso or word for word.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 2)
In fide fiducia. (Latin motto)
Translation: "There is trust in faith."

Motto of Leys School, Cambridge, U.K.

This entry is located in the following units: fid-, fidel- (page 4) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 2)
In fide vestra virtutem in virtute autem scientiam. (Latin motto)
Translation: "[Have] virtue in your faith but knowledge in your virtue."

Motto of Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia, USA.

In fide, justitia, et fortitudine.
In faith, justice, and strength.

Motto of the Order of St. George, Bavaria, Germany.

In filling out an application, where it says, "In case of emergency, notify..." I answered "a doctor".
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
in flagrante delicto (s) (adverb) (no comparatives)
Descriptive of discovering someone behaving in an illegitimate and unethical way: An in flagrante delicto refers to a legal term which is used to indicate that a criminal has been caught in the act of committing an illegal offense; literally, "with the crime still blazing".

The phrases: "caught red-handed" or "caught in the act" are English equivalents of in flagrante delicto.

in flower
When plants are in flower, the blossoms are growing on them: "The garden looked beautiful with all of the tulips that were in flower.
This entry is located in the following unit: flori-, flor-, flora-, -florous (page 5)
in folio
A once-folded sheet of printed matter.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 2)
In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.
We enter the circle after dark and are consumed by fire.

A Latin palindrome that describes the movement of moths.

In hac spe vivo.
In this hope, I live.
in large part, in large measure
Not entirely, but mostly: "The success of the drama was in large part because of the talents of the director."
This entry is located in the following unit: larg-, largi- + (page 1)
in lieu of
In place of; instead of.
This entry is located in the following unit: loco- (page 2)
in limine; in lim.
At or on the outset.

Used to describe something that is about to happen or is beginning to happen.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 3)
In loco parentis. (Latin legal term)
Translation: "In the place of a parent."

Having the responsibilities or role of a parent, e.g. teachers during the time students are under their charge are in the legal position of a guardian. Anyone who serves in loco parentis may be considered to have responsibilities of guardianship, either formal or informal, over minors.

In lumine tuo videbimus lumen. (Latin motto)
Translation: "In Thy light we shall see the light."

Also translated as, "In Thy light shall we see light." Motto of Columbia University, New York City, USA; the College of Great Falls; Great Falls, Montana; and Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, Ohio.

In medias res.
"Into the middle of things." Extended to mean: "Into the thick of it."

The way a story or play might begin, as when a story begins in the middle and then flashes back to the cause of a character's trouble or perdicament. The writer may begin the play, story, poem, or novel by jumping into an ongoing stream of action which is considered a powerful writing technique in any language.

The benefits of beginning a story, play, or poem in medias res, or "into the thick of it", are not limited to the opening pages. The same technique can be applied to each new "beginnings" in chapters of a novel, acts in a play, or stanzas in a poem.

The in medias res technique does not work for every story, novel, play, script, or poem. Certain works may simply require a more methodical approach; however, the in medias res can create a hook that grabs the readers' attention from the very beginning.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 3) medio-, medi- (page 2)
In medio tutissimus ibis.
"You shall go safest in the middle course."
This entry is located in the following unit: medio-, medi- (page 2)
in no uncertain terms (pl) (noun) (no singular)
In a very clear and direct way: Jim's mother repeated to him in no uncertain terms to never say that curse word again!
This entry is located in the following unit: cern-, cert-, cer-; cret-, creet-, cre- (page 3)
in nullius bonis
Among the goods or property of no person.

Belonging to no person; such as, a treasure-trove and wreck were anciently considered.

In omnia paratus.
Prepared for all things.

Ready for any eventuality; ready for anything.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 3) omni-, omn- (page 1)
In pace, ut sapiens, aptarit idonea bello.
In peace, like a wise man, he appropriately prepares for war.

This advice came from Horace in his Satires, used by modern advocates of a strong war machine as the best strategy for centuries and has yet to produce a lasting peace.

This entry is located in the following units: belli-, bell- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 3)
in pectore
In secret.

Anything done in pectore is done literally "in the breast"; such as, the designation of a cardinal by a pope without public announcement. The designation is said to be in pectore.

When the pope names new cardinals, sometimes he will announce that one or more are named in pectore; that is, "secretly". The name, or names, are not announced publicly and only the pope knows the name and even the new cardinal is aware that he has been chosen. Usually, it is not recorded anywhere.

During times of political hostilities, popes used in pectore

As anti-Catholic hostility among various governments became common, in pectore appointments became more common during the late 18th and 19th centuries.

Pope Pius VII created eleven cardinals in pectore; despite the anti-Church hostility of the French Revolution, all of them were eventually published, as were Pope Leo XII's three in pectore appointments.

The outbreak of major revolutions in Europe during the late 1820s caused the proportion of in pectore appointments to all cardinal appointments to rise dramatically: Pope Pius VIII created thirteen cardinals, but only five of them were ever published, while Pope Gregory XVI created as many as twenty-eight cardinals out of a total of eighty in pectore; of which five were unpublished.

Also, creati et reservati in pectore is a term which means, "create cardinals without declaring their names"; that is, "in the chest".

—Based on information from
The Catholic Encyclopedia, The Encyclopedia Press, Inc.; 1922.
and
"Catholic World News": http://www.cwnews.com
in perpetuum
Forever, in perpetuity.

Often seen on tombstones. Also presented as in perpetuo.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 3) peti-, pet-, -pit- (page 3)
in pleno
In full.

Payment in pleno is payment in full.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 3)
in praesenti
At present.

In praesenti means now rather than in futuro, or in the future.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 3)
in reality
In actual fact.
This entry is located in the following unit: real- (page 1)
In sapientia modus.
In wisdom a means [method].

Motto of The University of New England, Australia.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 3)
In silvam ne ligna feras.
Don't carry logs into the forest. -Horace
in situ
1. In its original or normal position.
2. In position, localized.
3. In the normal place without disturbing or invading the surrounding bodily tissue.
4. Not invasive; applied especially to carcinomas which have not invaded beyond their original epithelial confines.

Literally from Latin, "in place", an expression used by scholars, who may say, for example, that an observation or experiment was performed in situ, signifying that it was made in the natural or original location of the material or process under study.

in spite of; not, inspite of (prepositional phrase)
Regardless of, even though; without being affected by: "The tourist had difficulty communicating when she went to Germany in spite of all the years she studied German."

"In spite of the high prices, there is still enough demand for oil to keep the costs of gas higher than some people can afford."

"Note that unlike 'despite' being spelled as one word, 'in spite' [of] should always be spelled as two separate words and not as 'inspite [of]'. Remember: inspite of, NO; in spite of, YES!"

in tandem
If two things happen, or are used in tandem, they happen or are used at the same time; and if two people do something in tandem, they do it together.
This entry is located in the following unit: tandem (page 1)
in the affirmative
To accept or to agree to a statement or request: "She answered her son's request in the affirmative."
This entry is located in the following unit: firm- (page 2)
in the vicinity of (s) (noun), in the vicinities of (pl)
1. The area near some particular place: Janet used to live in the vicinity of the Los Angeles Airport in California, but she moved because it was much too noisy!
2. Used before a number to indicate that an amount is not exact, but approximate: The current population of that city is in the vicinity of 10,000.
This entry is located in the following unit: vicini-, vicin- (page 1)
in toto
Entirely.

This phrase can also be translated as "on the whole, altogether, in all, totally", and "completely".

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 4) total-, tot- + (page 1)
in utero
In the womb.

Prenatal; not yet born.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 4)
in vacuo
In emptiness.

In a vacuum or void; without reference to one's surroundings; without regard for reality.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 4) vacu- (page 1)
In vino veritas.
In wine is truth.

When a person is intoxicated, he/she utters many things which at other times would be concealed or disguised.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 4) veri-, ver- (page 1)
in vitro
A reference to a biological process which is made to occur in a laboratory vessel or other controlled experimental environment rather than within a living organism or natural setting.
2. Literally, "in glass", as in a test tube.

A test that is performed in vitro is one that is done in glass or plastic vessels in a laboratory.

In vitro is the opposite of in vivo (in a living organism).

This entry is located in the following unit: vitreo-, vitre-, vitr- + (page 1)
in vitro
Within or in glass.

Observable as in a test tube; e.g., "an in vitro birth."

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group I (page 4)
in vitro fertilization (s) (noun), in vitro fertilisation (British): IVF; in vitro fertilizations (pl)
1. A technique in which human egg cells are fertilized outside a woman's body: An in vitro fertilization is a major treatment for infertility where other methods of achieving conception have failed or is preferred by a couple based on their individual circumstances.

The process of in vitro fertilization involves hormonally controlling the ovulatory process, removing ova (eggs) from the woman's ovaries, like in Jennifer's case, and letting sperm fertilize them in a fluid medium. The fertilized egg (zygote) is then transferred to Jennifer's uterus with the purpose of having a successful pregnancy.

2. Etymology: In vitro is Latin for "in glass", referring to the test tubes; however, neither glass nor test tubes are used, and the term refers generically to laboratory procedures. Babies that are born as a result of in vitro fertilization are sometimes called "test tube babies".
This entry is located in the following units: -fer, -ferous (page 4) vitreo-, vitre-, vitr- + (page 1)
in vivo
in vivo
In or upon a living organism.

Opposite of in vitro.

Inflation: cutting money in half without damaging the paper.
in-use programming
The ability to write data to a tag while it is attached to its object.
keep a civil tongue in one's head
To be polite ad to be respectful when talking to someone: The bus driver was yelling at the woman and she told him to keep a civil tongue in his head.
This entry is located in the following unit: Tongue Idioms (page 1)
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 4)
living legend in his own time *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 13)
Local Area Network in Australia: the LAN down under.
locus in quo
The place in which.

The place in question or the spot mentioned. This phrase refers to a place where something of interest has occurred or where a passage under discussion may be found.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group L (page 3)
look what the cat dragged in
A reference to someone who has come into a room or an area: When Hayden got to the meeting quite late, the chairman said, "Well, look what the cat dragged in."
This entry is located in the following unit: cat, cats (page 1)
memoria in aeterna
In eternal remembrance.
meniscus in nature (s) (noun), menisci in nature (pl)
For a tiny insect, a pond's still surface can present a challenging waterscape.
  • To move from water to land, a water-walking creature may have to scale a steep, slippery slope—the curved edge where water meets leaf, rock, or floating object.
  • The curvature of a liquid's surface at a boundary is a consequence of the liquid's surface tension.
  • The sloped surface marking the border between wet and dry is called the meniscus.
  • Very small insects typically can't climb these frictionless mountains using their normal rowing motions or running gaits.
  • If they try to walk up, they slide back down.
  • Instead, these insects have to rely on a novel form of propulsion that doesn't require moving their legs back and forth.
  • As this water treader approaches a meniscus, its front and rear legs deform the water's surface to help it move up the slope.
  • Two species of water strider, for example, have retractable claws on their front and hind legs that allow them to pull up on the water to create tiny peaks.
  • At the same time, the central pair of legs presses down on the water to form dimples in the surface.
  • Because the insects are small, these peaks and dimples create sufficient force to pull the insects up the slope.
  • In effect, the insect creates tiny menisci with its front and rear legs.
  • Because menisci are attracted to other menisci, the net effect is to pull the insect up the slope at the water's edge.
  • These creatures can reach speeds as high as thirty body lengths per second.
  • In technical terms, the insects take advantage of lateral capillary forces that exist between small floating objects.
  • The force of attraction between body and meniscus "wall" depends on the body's buoyancy and on its distance from the wall.
  • Because the insect's front legs are closer to the wall than its rear legs are, the net effect is to propel the insect forward and upward.
  • The larva of the waterlily leaf beetle uses an alternative strategy to scale a slippery meniscus.
  • A poor swimmer, this creature simply arches its back, creating a meniscus at each end. The insect then gets pulled up the slope to a leaf.
  • In meniscus climbing, the researchers note, instead of moving its legs back and forth, an insect deforms the liquid's surface, converting muscular strain to the surface energy that powers its ascent.
  • In the realm of fluid dynamics, few researchers have previously tackled situations that involve surface tension as an important component.
  • The new results and related research may have important applications not only for understanding biolocomotion but also potentially in nanotechnology.
—Compiled from the article, "Climbing a Watery Slope" by Ivars Peterson,
in Science News Online, Week of November 5, 2005; Vol. 168, No. 19.
This entry is located in the following unit: menisc-, menisco- (page 1)
Mens sana in corpore sano.
Translations: 1. "A sound mind in a sound body." -Juvenal
2. "A healthy mind in a healthy body."

Actually, the whole sentence is Orandum est ut sit mens sana in corpore sano.: "You should pray for a healthy mind in a healthy body."

Juvenal, in his Satires, suggests to us that we must pray for attainment of mens sana in corpore sano, and his phrase has found use for many centuries as the stated educational goal of many schools: to train the body as well as the mind.

Public statements by some near-illiterate college athletes suggest that the sound body is too often achieved without accompanying improvement of the mind.

—Partially based on information from
Amo, Amas, Amat and More by Eugene Ehrlich;
Harper & Row, Publishers; New York; 1985; pages 184-185.
Misericordias Domini in aeternum cantabo.
I will sing the mercies of the Lord forever.

A motto of Abingdon School, U.K.

Mors certa sed hora in certa.
Death is certain, only the hour is uncertain.

From a 16th century German sun dial.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group M (page 4)
multum in parvo
"Much in little": a useful phrase for praising a message or a reference book that conveys a lot of information in few words.

Applied to articles of small bulk but of great comprehensiveness.

This entry is located in the following units: multi-, mult- (page 9) parvo-, parvi- + (page 1)
Nemo in amore videt.
No one in love can see.

From Propertius: Love is blind.

Nemo tenetur jurare in suam turpitudinem.
No one is bound to swear to the fact of his own criminality.

No one can be forced to give his own oath in evidence of his guilt.

Nemo unquam judicet in se. (Latin statement)
Translation: "No one can ever be a judge in his own cause."

A legal expression.

This entry is located in the following units: jud-, judic- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group N (page 2)
Nihil impense ames, ita fiet, ut in nullo contristeris.
Don't lose your heart for anything and you will not have to mourn anything.

Motto of Henry II, The Saint, (1002-1024) of Germany. He was considered prudent and powerful in his endeavors. He restored the lost reputation of the German-Roman realm and was an eager promoter of a reform movement started by the church.

In 1007; at an Imperial Diet in Franfurt, in the course of the Christianization of the territories on the upper Main, he founded the bishopric of Bamberg, which earned him the name "the Saint". He, and his wife Kunigunde, were buried there. In 1146, Henry II was canonized followed by Kunigunde in 1200.

Non bis in idem.
Not twice for the same thing.

This expression is about double jeopardy in the courts. It could also be a child's defense against further punishment by his/her father after being punished by her/his mother.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group N (page 4) non- + (page 1)
Non est magnus pumilio, licet in monte constiterit; colossus magnitudinem suam servabit, etiam si steterit in puteo. (Latin proverb)
Translation: "A dwarf is not tall, even though he stand on a mountain; a colossus keeps his height, even though he stand in a well."

From Seneca, Ad Lucilium Epis (c. A.D. 65).

opere in mendio
In the midst of work.

This phrase could be useful when you are interrupted by the phone and you respond with, "Hello, you just caught me opere in medio." Pronounced as [AW puh ruh in MEH dee oh].

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group O (page 1)
outside in the yard
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 16)
pax in bello
Peace in war.

A peace in which fighting continues but at a reduced rate; a half-hearted conflict.

This entry is located in the following units: belli-, bell- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 2)
perpetuity, in perpetuity
1. Time without end; eternity or the rest of time which is an endless or indefinitely long duration or existence.
2. An annuity payable indefinitely or an investment designed to pay an annual return indefinitely, having no maturity date.
3. A situation in which something or someone is being in perpetuity; such as, to desire happiness in perpetuity.
4. A continued, uninterrupted existence, or a duration for an indefinite period of time; such as, the perpetuity of laws and institutions; the perpetuity of fame.
This entry is located in the following units: per- (page 8) peti-, pet-, -pit- (page 4)
plane flying aloft in the air above *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 17)
Pleasure, Charm, and Beauty in Human Life and in Nature: Graces
Greek: Graces (goddesses); Aglaia (brilliance); Euphrosyne (joy); Thalia (bloom)
Latin: (no equivalent goddess)
This entry is located in the following units: gods and goddesses from Greek and Latin Myths (page 2) nasc-, nat- (page 5)
P.M. in the evening
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 17)
pro-, a prefix used in front of a noun
In favor of or supporting something or someone; often used with a hyphen: A few examples of pro- include the following: pro-life, pro-American, pro-European, etc.
This entry is located in the following unit: pro-, por-, pur- (page 2)
Provenito in altum.
May He appear on high.

Motto of Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.

Quasi in rem jurisdiction. (Latin legal statement)
Translation: "A type of jurisdiction of a court based on a person's interest in property within the jurisdiction of the court."

Quasi in rem jurisdiction refers to proceedings that are brought against the defendant personally; yet it is the defendant's interest in the property that serves as the basis of the jurisdiction.

This entry is located in the following units: dic-, dict- (page 8) juris- (page 2) jus-, just-, jur- (page 6) quasi- (page 1)
quater in die, q.i.d.
Four times a day.

Instructions given by a pharmacist.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group Q (page 1)
quater in nocte, q.i.n.
Four times a night.

Used in medical prescriptions.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group Q (page 1)
Quoniam mille anni ante oculos tuos, tanquam dies hesterna, quae praeteriit, et custodio in nocte.
A thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night.

From the Old Testament, Psalms 90:4.

Relief: What trees do in the spring.
requiescat in pace (R.I.P.)
This entry is located in the following unit: quies-, -quiet-, -quit- (page 3)
Requiescat in pace; R.I.P.
May he [or she] rest in peace.

This R.I.P. symbol is used on tombstones, cards of mourning, etc. The plural form is Requiescant in pace, "May they rest in peace." The abbreviation, R.I.P. is used for both the singular and the plural applications.

Res in cardine est. (Latin proverb)
Translation: "The matter is on a door hinge."

Another translation is "We are facing a crisis."

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group R (page 2)
semel in die; s.i.d.
Once a day.

Used with medical prescriptions.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group S (page 2)
Semper vivit in armis.
He is always armed.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group S (page 3)
Shin: A device for finding furniture in the dark.
Stans pede in uno.
Standing on one foot.

From Satires by Horace. It also means, "effortlessly" and is the equivalent to the English expression "I can do that standing on one foot."

Symbiosis: As Seen in This Hippo and Tortoise Relationship
Animals: An Example of a Symbiotic Relationship.
This entry is located in the following unit: Animal Index (page 1)
Tempora mutantur nos et mutamur in illis. (Latin term)
Translation: "Times change and we change with them."

Attributed to John Owen who died in 1622, a Welshman known for his Latin epigrams.

ter in die; t.i.d.
Three times a day.

Instructions given for medical treatment.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group T (page 2)
ter in nocte, t.i.n.
Three times a night.

Instructions given for medical treatment.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group T (page 2)
Testibus deponentibus in pari numero, dignioribus est credendum. (Latin proverb)
Translation: "Where the witnesses who testify are in equal number (on both sides), the more worthy are they to be believed."
This entry is located in the following units: dign-, dain- (page 2) numer-, number- (page 5) pari-, par- (page 3) testi-, test- (page 4)
Testis lupanaris sufficit ad factum in lupanari
A lewd person is a sufficient witness to an act committed in a brothel.
Testis lupanaris sufficit ad factum in lupanari.
A lewd person is a sufficient witness to an act committed in a brothel.

A maxim about the legality of testimony.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group T (page 3) testi-, test- (page 5)
Testis nemo in sua causa esse potest
No one can be a witness in his own cause.
This entry is located in the following unit: testi-, test- (page 5)
Testis nemo in sua causa esse potest.
No one can be a witness in his own cause.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group T (page 3)
Thermos®, Thermos flask; in the U.S., thermos bottle
1. A trademark for an insulated or vacuum container used to hold a liquid or food and to maintain it at a constant or original temperature.
2. Etymology: a trademark registered in Britain in 1907, invented by Sir James Dewar; patented in 1904 but not named at the time, from Greek thermos, "hot".

James Dewar built the first one in 1892, but it was first manufactured commercially in Germany in 1904, when two glass blowers formed the company Thermos GmbH.

Those who jump off a bridge in Paris are in Seine.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 6)
tongue in cheek
To say something that one does not intend to be taken seriously or to be true: Mike told his girlfriend, with tongue in cheek, that she had just won the lottery.
This entry is located in the following unit: Tongue Idioms (page 1)
Ubi pugnantia inter se in testamento juberentur, neutrum ratum est.
Where repugnant or inconsistent directions are contained in a will, neither is valid.
This entry is located in the following units: neutro-, neuter-, neutr-, neut- + (page 2) pugn-, pug-, pugil- (page 2) testi-, test- (page 6) ubi- (page 2)
Vade in pace.
Go in peace.

Another Roman way of saying, "goodbye".

Vaseball: a game of catch played by children in the living room.
Verbum Domioni manet in aeternum.
The Word of the Lord endureth forever." [As seen in I Peter 1:25, of the Bible]
This entry is located in the following units: aevum, evum; etern-; aeternus (page 2) verbo-, verb-, verbi- (page 6)
Virtus in actione consistit.
Valor lies in action.

Action, not merely with words. How about "Action speaks louder than words"?

Vox clamans in deserto. (Latin)
Translation: "A voice crying in the wilderness."

Motto of Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group V (page 7)
Vox clamantis in deserto.
The voice of one crying in the wilderness.

Familiar words from the New Testament in the Bible.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group V (page 8)
We never really grow up; we only learn how to behave in public.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 6)
When someone is in prison, what is his or her favorite punctuation mark?

A period, because it is at the end of a sentence.

This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 7)
Where there's a will, I want to be in it.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 7)
Wind turbines for power in Denmark
Viewed from the United States or Asia, Denmark is an environmental role model.

About one-fifth of the Denmark's electricity comes from wind, which wind experts say is the highest proportion of any country.

A closer look shows that Denmark is a far cry from a clean-energy paradise.

The building of wind turbines has virtually ground to a halt since subsidies were cut back.

Meanwhile, compared with others in the European Union, Danes remain above-average emitters of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide.

For all of its wind turbines, a large proportion of the rest of Denmark's power is generated by plants that burn imported coal.

The Danish experience shows how difficult it can be for countries grown rich on fossil fuels to switch to renewable energy sources like wind power.

Among the hurdles are fluctuating political priorities, the high cost of putting new turbines offshore, concern about public acceptance of large wind turbines, and the destructive volatility of the wind itself.

Some parts of western Denmark derive 100 percent of their peak needs from wind if the breeze is up.

Germany and Spain generate more power in absolute terms, but in those countries wind still accounts for a far smaller proportion of the electricity generated. The average for all 27 European Union countries is three percent.

The Germans and the Spanish are catching up as Denmark slows down.

—Excerpts compiled from "Denmark meets hurdles on its course to a power solution"
by James Kanter; Internationl Herald Tribune; March 22, 2007; page 13.
(shortened forms of spoken words or written symbols, or phrases, used chiefly in writing to represent the complete forms)
(generally a reference to indigenous people in general; being the first or earliest known of its kind present in a region: aboriginal forests, aboriginal rocks; of or relating to Aborigines or people of Australia)
(the origins and more recent usage as a term used in the performances of prestidigitation or "magic")
(Greek: beginning; the first, the leader, the ruler; being first has two different, but often related, meanings: one meaning indicated first in time; another indicated first in importance)
(the science of the celestial bodies: the sun, the moon, and the planets; the stars and galaxies; and all of the other objects in the universe)
(phrases or Bible quotations that are derived directly from the King Jame's version of the Bible many of which are direct quotations)
(sources of information for the various terms listed in the Index of Scientific and Technological Topics)
(English phrases which are often badly phrased on signs in public places and other media)
(Photo of world leaders at work)
(all of the enhanced units present parts of speeches (when applicable), have definitions for word entries, and clarifying sentences in context)
(some of the common terms used in computer science)
(a radiographic technique that produces an image of a detailed cross section of bodily tissue using a narrow collimated beam of x-rays that rotates in a full arc around a patient to image the body in cross-sectional slices)
(lexicomedy, linguicomedy, or a chuckleglossary consisting of definitions which are markedly different from the accepted dictionary norm)
(New plagues, survival, and the various mutual adaptations carried on with our microbial fellow travelers)
(New diseases are always coming into existence, most change with time, and some even vanish from known existence!)
(Until recently, the usual explanation for the first pandemics was not biological but a result of immorality)
(electricity has become one of the most significant areas of study in the world)
(concern over the environmental impact of burning fossil fuels has resulted in looking for alternative fuels that are less polluting)
(an official language of the Republic of South Africa which developed from the Dutch of the colonists who went there in the 1600's; South African Dutch)
(the language of a group of American Indian tribes that lived in the valleys of the Ottawa River and of the northern tributaries of the St. Lawrence River)
(languages spoken by over 400 closely related groups in central, east-central, and southern Africa, belonging to the South Central subgroup of the Niger-Congo language family and including Swahili, Kinyarwanda, Kirundi, Zulu, Xhosa, etc.)
(the language of France is also spoken in Belgium, Switzerland, Canada, Haiti, Monaco, New Caledonia, and several other countries including some areas of the U.S.; such as, Louisiana and some New England states)
(many words in English come from a variety of foreign sources)
(an alphabetized listing of links to a world of the uncompromising multi-purpose, majestic, and fathomable universe of words)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(a variety of English words which have developed through history and are currently used in our modern age)
(ecology is the study of the relationship between organisms and the environments in which they live, including all living and nonliving components)
(Greek: eu, "good, well; sounding good" + pheme, "speaking, speech"; mild, agreeable, or roundabout words used in place of coarse, painful, or offensive ones)
(examples of how words can be applied in abnormal ways)
(Old English: (first meaning), more forward; (current meaning), in addition, to a grater degree)
(geography includes mapmakers, scientists, explorers of the earth and provides a way to look at both the physical world and the people who live in various parts this globe)
(a glossary, or dictionary, of terms used in geology; the science of the earth including its origin, composition, structure, and history)
(when visiting old graveyards and examining the epitaphs on gravestones, there are certain words and phrases which could be difficult or impossible to understand without knowing what the words in this unit mean)
(medical professionals and scientists who specialize in designated areas of medical care)
(the science of water which denotes the study of the properties, distribution, and movements of water on land surfaces, in the soil, and through the subsurface rocks of the earth)
(a description in which plants can be produced in containers filled with water and a number of other non-soil contents)
(Latin punctus "a point" or "a mark"; the standardized non-alphabetical symbols or marks that are used to organize writing into clauses, phrases, and sentences, and in this way to clarify meanings)
(a compilation of excerpts and quotes from past issues of magazines and books so they won't be lost in the present)
(There are estimated to be 10,000 million insects living in each square kilometer of habitable land on earth or 26,000 million per square mile)
(Latin origins of words in English characterized by "jumping, leaping", or "springing forward")
(a glossary of terms relating to the decoration and design of interior spaces in buildings)
(Italian developed from Latin and the following words came into English from Italian; most of which were derived from Latin)
(the first Latin words to find their way into the English language owe their adoption to the early contact between the Roman and the Germanic tribes on the European continent and Greek came with Latin and French while others were borrowed directly; especially, in the fields of science and technology)
(just a few of the many important words with several applications in common practice and referring to special technical and scientific operations)
(there are certain anatomic terms which present various situations; for example, a body part may be horizontal, as opposed to vertical; in front as opposed to being behind or at the back; above as opposed to being under, etc.)
(how some terms might be interpreted by those who lack professional vocabulary knowledge in the field of medicine)
(leeches are bleeding their way back into the good graces of modern medical treatment as healers just as they did in ancient societies)
(the advantages of self determination in fulfilling your objectives and belief in your aspirations can improve your mental control and enhance your health)
(the study of the deep seas or oceans involves the abyss or the "deep seas" which cover almost two-thirds of the earth's surface; showing applicable scientific terminology in this unit)
(the challenges that face people in their later years)
(based on words from The Washington Post's "Style Invitational" in which readers were given the opportunity to take any word from the dictionary, alter it by adding, subtracting, or changing one letter, and then to provide a new definition for the modified word)
(this page includes a presentation of the punctuation marks or symbols that are in general use in English writing)
(terms appearing in some "scientific" areas from about 2000 B.C. to 1799 A.D.)
(terms appearing in some "scientific" areas from about 1800 A.D. to 1899 A.D.)
(the spread of information with the "wiring" of the world has improved communications between people and accelerated the pace of scientific discoveries as well as greater efficiency in the exchange of technical knowledge and applications)
(insects that live in colonies which, in some ways, resemble human cities are ants, bees, wasps, hornets, and termites)
(bibliographic sources of information from which words and sentences have been compiled about words and expressions English speakers should know for better understanding and communication)
(engineering is the technical science in which properties of matter and the sources of power in nature are made useful to people; such as, in structures, devices, machines, and products)
(theater as we know it was originated by the Greeks and many of their theatrical terms are still in use)
(in 1946, an eighteen-year-old San Diego High School student wrote an essay in which he asked for plain courtesy when driving)
(A family of words ending in -ude.)
(A visual presentation of various plants, animals, insects and other forms of life in their environments)
(words exist in all sizes and degrees of difficulty from numerous languages and English continues to churn out new words from the past and the present)
(words being used in news media headlines, subheadings, and excerpts from applicable articles with certain words being listed in bold and defined separately)
(many of the words used today in English are derived from Greek myths)
(an exhibition of words that appear in headlines and sub-headlines which all of us should know)
(lists of words used in context from various printed media; including, statements that help readers determine how words function in various contents)
(a collection of English words that have been used in the titles of articles from various printed media)
(phyla rhymes or major taxonomic groups, classifying of living organisms, into which animals are divided and made up of several classes in poetic format)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “in
(noun) (s) uncountable noun, used only in the singular form
1. (noun) (s): "uncountable", "uncountable noun", or "mass noun" are all terms that refer to a noun that cannot be used freely with numbers or the indefinite article, and which, therefore, usually take no plural forms.

The English nouns, perseverance, information, are uncountable nouns (or "mass nouns), at least in their primary meanings.

With such terms, it is not proper to say that there is one perseverance, nor that there are many perseverances or many informations.

2. Some dictionaries use the entry for a noun with the label [noncount] when it doesn't have a plural form or when it refers to something that can't be counted.
3. When a word can be used as both a singular noun and a plural noun, certain dictionaries will label it [count, noncount].
This entry is located in the following unit: noun (s), nouns (pl) (page 1)
A drop in the bucket (Isaiah 40:15)
"Behold, the nations are as a drop of a bucket, and are counted as the small dust of the balance: behold, he taketh up the isles as a very little thing."
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 1)
A voice crying in the wilderness (John 1:23)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 1)
A wolf in sheep's clothing (Matthew 7:15)
"Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves."
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 1)
abound in/with (verb phrase), abounds in/with; abounded in/with; abounding in/with
To be filled with something or to contain a very large amount of something: Ethan lives in an area that abounds with oil.

Yesterday, Grover was fishing in a stream that abounded in fish.

This entry is located in the following unit: English Words in Action, Group A (page 2)
Additional words that were found which are derived from the Greek element tribo- are explained in the following contents:

Additional words that exist that are derived from the Greek element tribo-: nanotribology, [no dictionary seems to be available that has a definition for this term.] The following definitions came from various sources on the internet.

First, on Thursday, January 21, 1999, there was the following information from Dr. Jacqueline Krim, Professor of Physics at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina:

“Thank you for your inquiry. Yes, I coined the term nanotribology in a paper I wrote in 1991, entitled, ‘Nanotribology of a Kr [krypton] monolayer: A Quartz Crystal Microbalance Study of Atomic-Scale Friction’, J. Krim, D. Solina and R. Chiarello, PRL, 66, (1991) p. 181-184.”

“I would define nanotribology as the sub-field of tribology involving contact geometries which are well-characterized at atomic length or time scales. These tend to be on the order of nanometers and nanoseconds.”

“JK”


Secondly, on Friday, January 22, 1999, I received another clarifying definition that I had requested from a contact I found on the internet.

I asked for a simple, easy to understand definition of “nanotribology” and this is what he sent to me:

“Tribology is the science and technology of two surfaces in relative motion which encompasses friction, wear, and lubrication. Nanotribology allows the study of friction and wear processes on nanoscale.”

—Prof. Bharat Bhushan, Ohio Eminent Scholar and The Howard D. Winbigler Professor
and Director, Computer Microtribology and Contamination Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio

Now you know what nanotribology means, don’t you? If you want to know more about nanotribology, here are excerpts of other definitions; but be WARNED that if they are too confusing or of no interest to you, you may scroll down to the area where other tribo- words are presented. Don’t give up before you see the rest of the list, please.

Micro/nanotribology as a field is concerned with experimental and theoretical investigations of processes ranging from atomic and molecular scales to the microscale, occurring during adhesion, friction, wear, and thin-film lubrication at sliding surfaces.

This involves determination of the chemical, physical and mechanical properties of the surfaces undergoing relative motion at length scales of the order of nanometers. Interaction between rubbing surfaces occurs at asperities [roughness of surfaces] at which the local pressure and temperatures can be very high.

These conditions can lead to formation of tribochemical films with the unusual properties necessary for efficient wear protection. The nanomechanical properties of these films are being investigated by interfacial force microscopy (IFM) which is capable of determining the elastic constants and anelastic behavior of the films in boundary layer lubrication.

Proposed nanotribology experiments for the Triboscope include studying the effect of different contact areas, scan directions and crystallographic orientations on both lubricated and unlubricated surfaces.

Tribology is the study of friction, lubrication and wear. Nanotribology is roughly defined as the study of these same phenomena down to the nN and nanometer force and length scales.

I hope I haven’t lost you in the sea of obfuscation (confusion, obscurity, or bewilderment) because there are other interesting words to learn. Here are additional examples that are derived from tribo-:

  • triboelectric, an electrical charge produced by friction between two objects; such as, rubbing silk on a glass surface.
  • triboelectricity, in physics, electrical charges produced by friction between two surfaces; static electricity.
  • Frictional electricity … was supposedly known to the ancient Greeks, particularly Thales of Miletus, who observed about 600 B.C. that when amber was rubbed, it would attract small bits of matter. The term “frictional electricity” gave way to “triboelectricity,” although since “tribo” means “to rub,” the newer term does little to change the concept.

    —A.D. Moore (as seen in The American Heritage Dictionary of Science
    by Robert K. Barnhart; Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston; 1986).

  • tribofluorescence, triboflurescent; to give off light as a result of friction.
  • tribologist, a specialist in the science of tribology.
  • tribology, tribological, the science of the mechanisms of friction, lubrication, and wear of interacting surfaces that are in relative motion.
  • triboluminescence, the quality of emitting light under friction or violent mechanical pressure.
  • triboluminescent, exhibiting triboluminescence.
  • tribophosphorescence, tribophosphorescent; to produce light by friction.
  • tribothermoluminescence, thermoluminescence [luminescence resulting from exposure to high temperature] produced in a material as a result of friction.
  • tribometer, an instrument for estimating sliding friction.
  • tribophysics, the physical properties or phenomena associated with friction.
  • tribophosphoroscope, an instrument for examining triboluminescence.
  • tribulation, originally from Greek; then through Latin, “to press; affliction”; distress, great trial, or affliction.

“The Roman tribulum was a sledge consisting of a wooden block studded with sharp pieces of flint or iron teeth. It was used to bring force and pressure against wheat in grinding out grain.

The machine suggested the way trouble grinds people down and oppresses them, tribulations becoming another word for troubles and afflictions. The word is first recorded in English in 1330.”.

—From the Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins
by Robert Hendrickson; Facts On File, Inc., New York; 1997.

The Romans ground out their corn [make that grain-J.R.] with a heavy roller, mentioned in Vergil’s Georgics among agricultural instruments: the tribulum, diminutive noun, from tritere, trit —, to rub, from Greek tribein, to rub. Being ground under and pressed out made an excellent metaphor to express the trials and tribulations of the early Christians.

Dictionary of Word Origins by Joseph T. Shipley.

“To know the origin of words is to know how men think, how they have fashioned their civilization. Word history traces the path of human fellowship, the bridges from mind to mind, from nation to nation.

“Some of the words in our language can be traced to a remote past; some have histories that begin but yesterday. Many are members of large families, with intertwining legend and history. Slow change, swift new coinage of science or slang, ancient or recent borrowing from many tongues: together they give flexibility, power, and beauty to English, the richest and most widespread language of all time.”

— Joseph T. Shipley, from the Preface of his Dictionary of Word Origins.
This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #05 (page 1)
Afghan girl tricked by insurgents dies in blast
tricked:
insurgents: Those who belong to a group of people fighting to take control of their country by force.
blast: An explosion, especially one caused by a bomb.
remote:
detonated the bomb remotely:

"Insurgents tricked an 8-year-old girl in a remote area of central Afghanistan into carrying a bomb wrapped in a cloth and then detonated the bomb remotely when she was close to a policed vehicle. Only the girl was killed in the blast."

International Herald Tribune, June 26, 2011; page 5.
babe in the woods (s) (noun), babes in the woods (pl)
An innocent or naive person; a helpless person: When Karissa arrived in New York, she felt like a babe in the woods.
This entry is located in the following unit: English Words in Action, Group B (page 1)
Banana tariffs in European Union (EU)
A reference to an extensive (16year) legal conflict between the European Union and US corporations to reduce import tariffs of specific fruit from Latin America: The heads of the corporations celebrated the end of the Banana Tariffs allowing them to increase their profits and lowering the prices of bananas in Europe.

The World Trade Organization (WTO) has consistently ruled against how the EU set tariffs for bananas, forcing the 27-country bloc to over haul a system that grants preferential conditions for producers from African and Caribbean countries, mainly former British and French colonies.

This entry is located in the following unit: English Words in Action, Group B (page 2)
Best in Show
The dog judged to be the best of all breeds at a dog show.
This entry is located in the following unit: Dog or Canine Terms + (page 2)
biomass in the ecology
The total mass of living organisms present in a given area.

It may be specified for a particular species; such as, earthworm biomass or for a general category; such as, herbivore biomass.

Estimates also exist for the entire global plant biomass and measurements of biomass can be used to study interactions between organisms, the stability of those interactions, and variations in population numbers.

Whenever dry biomass is measured, the material is dried to remove all water before weighing.

This entry is located in the following unit: Environment and Ecology Information + (page 1)
Biopiracy: In the News
Biological theft by illegally collecting indigenous plants, microbes, enzymes, etc. by corporations who patent them for their own commercial use unit.
Come up with any three numbers in sequence; for example, 123, or 345, or 456, etc.
Reverse the numbers that you chose and subtract the smaller number from the larger number.

The result will always be 198. For example, 123 would become 321; subtract 123 from 321, and the answer is 198.

Try it and see for yourself.

This entry is located in the following unit: Number Challenges (page 1)
Early flaws of euro are resurfacing in debt crisis
flaws:
resurfacing:
debt crisis :

When the rules for the euro were first drafted 15 years ago, the leaders of France and Germany had to compromise even to agree on its name: Berlin wanted a 'a stability pact,' emphasizing Germanic fiscal discipline, while the French leaders insisted on adding 'growth' to the title to make it more palatable to their voters."

International Herald Tribune, August 18, 2011; page 1.
Elephants walking in the sunset.
An adult and a small elephant are walking across the horizon.

An adult and a young elephant are walking across the Masai Mara, a National Reserve in Kenya, Africa; just as it is getting dark.

This entry is located in the following unit: Views of Nature (page 1)
English Words in Action, Groups A to Z

An alphabetized listing of links to groups of English words in action as seen in sentences with short definitions.

Words are being added daily to expand your potential vocabulary for this modern age.

This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 1)
flow variable in economics
1. An economic magnitude describing behavior that takes place over time and is therefore meaningful to a unit of time.

Examples include: the value of exports (dollars per year), demand for foreign exchange (euros per day), and migration (people per month).

2. Activities that occur over time; for example, income is a flow that occurs per week, per month, or per year.
This entry is located in the following unit: flow + (page 1)
Fly in the ointment (adapted from Ecclesiastes 10:1)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 2)
Frogs in Water
One frog in the stream.
—Photographed by Wolfram Bleul, E-mail: kontakt@wolframbleul.de

Frogs in the stream.
—Photographed by Wolfram Bleul, E-mail: kontakt@wolframbleul.de

This entry is located in the following unit: Views of Nature (page 1)
Home prices in U.S. still deteriorating

"The American housing market seems to be getting worse as time passes."

In articulo mortis.
At the point of death.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 4)
In facie ecclesiae.
Before the church.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 4)
In futuro.
Henceforth.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 4)
In memoriam.
In memory of [followed by a name].
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 4)
In nomine Domini.
In the name of the Lord . . .
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 4)
In perpetuum.
For ever.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 5)
in pr., in principio
in the beginning
This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 2)
In secula seculorum.
For ever and ever.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 5)
in Seine
Those who jump off a bridge in Paris are in Seine.
This entry is located in the following unit: Definitions in Deviant and Comical Format (page 4)
in situ
1. In its natural or original place.
2. In the original position
This entry is located in the following unit: Geology or Related Geological Terms + (page 6)
in situ
In place.

A description of artifacts in sites that are recovered by the archeologist in their original locations.

This entry is located in the following unit: Archeology, Archaeology (page 4)
In the news

Couple will pay $2.3 million to have the family pet cloned as seen in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, September 6, 1998.

“A couple who are convinced they have the perfect dog with the perfect bark and the perfect howl are giving $2.3 million to Texas A&M University to clone their beloved animal, Missy.

“Besides making a litter of Missy pups, the Texas A&M scientists hope to learn more about canine reproduction and improve contraception and sterilization methods. The project could also lead to the replication of exceptional animals, such as guide dogs or rescue dogs.”

I once saw a sign at a copy-service store that read, “Clone your own.” So where did the word “clone” come from? It’s etymological source is Greek, and means “twig”, “slip”, “sprout”, or “shoot” and apparently refers to the reproduction of the plant from which the twig comes [my guess]. Do you have a better explanation? If you do, please send it to me so I can share it with the list. I could not find any explanation in my etymological dictionaries nor in any other abridged or unabridged dictionary. Definitions are available for the word clone, but no explanations about the Greek source.


Another article in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (September 6, 1998) caught my attention:


Robot leads tours at history museum in nation’s capital  The article talks about Minerva, who isn’t a typical tour guide. She’s four feet high and shaped like a tank.

“Minerva, named for the Roman goddess of wisdom, was developed by a team under Sebastian Thrun, 31, assistant professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon.”

According to the article, “She leads five tours that cover three to five items each. They deal largely with robots and how they are made.”

My question to you is, if we call a “male” robot an android (in the form, or shape, of a man); what should we call a robot that is in the form, or shape, of a woman? If you would like to easily find the answer, go to this gynoid page.

This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #01 (page 1)
In the twinkling of an eye (1 Corinthians 15:52)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 3)
Index of Information from Past Publications Revealed in the Present, Part 1
Information from the Past and into the Present, Part 1; Historical perspectives of the Reader's Digest.
Index of Information from Past Publications Revealed in the Present, Part 2
Information from the Past and into the Present, Part 2; Excerpts of humorous and more serious topics from the Reader's Digest March, 1932.
Index of Information from Past Publications Revealed in the Present, Part 3
Information from the Past and into the Present, Part 3; A few words from the Reader's Digest July, 1940.
Lithium, a natural resource in great demand
Lithium and its future.
This entry is located in the following unit: Words at Work in the Print Media: INDEX (page 1)
Lithium, a natural resource in great demand
A limited natural resource known as Lithium which may be in greater global demand.
This entry is located in the following unit: Index of Scientific and Technological Topics (page 2)
Mnemonic devices can guarantee greater accuracy in spelling certain English words.

Before you read this section about mnemonics, please STOP here NOW, and take a “pre-test” over the words that will be discussed. Even if you do well on this test, you may still come back for the presentation. So, please go to (click on) the Mnemonics "Seed" Quiz over -cede, -ceed, -sede words to see how well you can spell words that have the endings that are pronounced “seed”.

How to decide between -cede, -ceed, and -sede.

The spelling of many English words is confusing even to those whose first language is English.

Problems: Is it supercede, superceed, or supersede? Is it accede or acceed? Is it proceed or preceed, and is it excede or exceed?


  • Let’s examine the simple facts and basic principles behind the spelling patterns of all of the English words that end with the pronunciation of seed. There are just twelve words that have the seed pronounced endings.
  • To avoid doubt and confusion, to be able to make an instantaneous, self-assured, and accurate decision on the spelling of any word whose final syllable is pronounced seed, you have to know two things:

    1. Of the twelve words, one, and only one, ends in the four letters -S-E-D-E. That one word is supersede
    Supersede, is the only word in the entire English language that is spelled with the -sede ending.

    Supersede was born in Rome thousands of years ago. It comes from Latin super, “above”, and sedeo, “to sit”.

    If one thing supersedes another, it figuratively, and by derivation, “sits above or over it”; that is, “it replaces” something. An example: “The year 2000 will supersede 1999.”

    Supersede is the only verb in English that derives directly from Latin sedeo, to sit, hence the only word with the -sede termination.

    There are many nouns and adjectives that come indirectly from sedeo or one of its forms:

    president, one who sits before a group;
    sedentary, moving little, hence sitting, as in a sedentary occupation;
    session, a sitting or meeting of a group of people;
    sedate, calm, hence sitting still, etc.

    2. There are three other unique words that you should learn, the three words that end in the letters -C-E-E-D: succeed, proceed, and exceed.

  • These two facts, that only supersede ends in -sede, and that only succeed, proceed, and exceed end in -ceed, permit you to make an immediate and correct choice between -sede, -ceed, and -cede.
  • Obviously, with two of the three possible spellings accounted for, the eight remaining words of the original twelve can end in only one way: -C-E-D-E.
  • 3. It’s unnecessary that you learn what these eight words are or that you learn how to spell all or any of them because you know that they all end with -cede.
  • For your information, here are the eight words:

    accede, to give consent; to become a party to an agreement or treaty.

    antecede, to precede; that is, to come before in time or order.

    cede, to surrender possession of formally or officially; to yield or grant, as by a treaty.

    concede, 1. To acknowledge as true, just, or proper, often unwillingly; to admit by conceding the point. 2. To give or grant as a privilege or right.

    intercede, to argue on another’s behalf; to act as a mediator in a dispute; to come between.

    precede, to come before in time, in rank, or order.

    recede, to move back or away from a limit, point, or mark.

    secede, to withdraw formally from membership in an association, organization, or alliance, especially a political one.

  • How can you remember that succeed, proceed, and exceed belong in a class by themselves, and are not to be confused with the eight -cede words? How can you fix these three crucial verbs permanently in your mind, nail them down for all time?

  • Keep these facts in mind:

    Succeed starts with “s”.
    Proceed starts with “p”, and means go ahead.
    Exceed starts with “e”.

  • Now think of, and remember, the key phrase: “Full Speed Ahead”. This one phrase, Full Speed Ahead, and in particular the word speed, will be your guarantee against two unpleasant possibilities:

    1. Any annoying doubt as to whether a word correctly ends in -ceed or -cede.

    2. Any error in writing -cede for -ceed, or vice versa.


  • Notice how simply this mnemonic works:

    Speed ends in -eed.
    The “s” of speed identifies succeed.
    The “p” of speed identifies proceed.
    The “e” of speed identifies exceed.
    The ending of speed identifies the endings of all three words: succeed, proceed, exceed.
    Finally, the word “ahead” in “Full Speed Ahead” identifies proceed, which means “go ahead”, and eliminates “precede”, which means “come before”.

  • There is one irregularity that you should be aware of:

    Proceed, as you know, belongs to one of the three -ceed verbs, but the noun and adjective forms do not follow the same format. Contrary to what you might normally expect, these forms are spelled: procedure and procedural.


  • That’s all there is to the problem of making a choice between -cede, -ceed, and
    -sede.
  • Here are the basic principles again:

    Only one word in English ends in -sede, namely supersede.

    Only three words in English end in -ceed, namely succeed, proceed, and exceed (mnemonic: Full speed Ahead).

    All of the other words with a similar “seed” sound end in -cede.

    Procedure and procedural; however, do not follow the pattern of proceed.

    Now is a good time to test yourself.


    Would you like to see if the mnemonic devices I have given to you function properly? If so, just click on this self-grading Mnemonics "Seed" Quiz again so you can re-take the -cede, -ceed, -sede words so you can see how easy it is to recognize the correct spelling of these words.

  • This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #04 (page 1)
    noun (s) uncountable noun, used only in the singular form

    Go to this nouns page for information about usages and applications.

    This entry is located in the following unit: Parts of Speech for Word Entries (page 1)
    Nuclear sites in Germany face closure
    sites:
    face:
    closure:

    "Seven nuclear power plants in Germany that were shut down after the Fukushima disaster in Japan are likely to be closed permanently afte a decision by state environment ministers."

    "A government agency warned, however, that without the seven plants Germany could have trouble coping with a failure in some part of the national power grid."

    The Global Edition of the New York Times, May 28-29, 2011; page 15.
    Planets in motion
    Passively drifting and wandering in the sky unit.
    Political problems in the U.S. with applicable quotes

      “Everything is changing. People are taking their comedians seriously and the politicians as a joke.”

      —Will Rogers

      “Politicians say they’re beefing up our economy. Most don’t know beef from pork.”

      —Harold Lowman

      “Washington is a place where politicians don’t know which way is up and taxes don’t know which way is down.”

      —Robert Orben

      “Politics is the art of getting money from the rich and votes from the poor, with the pretext of protecting one from the other.”

      —Muy Interesante
    This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #11 (page 1)
    Put words in her mouth (2 Samuel 14:3)
    This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 4)
    Put your house in order (2 Kings 20:1)
    This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 4)
    Requiescat in pace (s), Requiescant in pace (pl); R.I.P.
    May he/she rest in peace.(s)
    May they rest in peace. (pl)
    This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 5)
    Results of Previous "Mnemonic devices can guarantee greater accuracy in spelling English words.

    First, the results of the principal/principle survey

    The spelling of many English words are confusing even to those whose first language is English.

    There were 45 per cent of the subscribers on the Focusing on Words Newsletter list who responded to the survey.

    • 1. The (principal/principle) reason for this discussion is to improve one’s spelling skills.

      Of those responding, 68 per cent chose the right answer (principal).

    • 2. All of us should live by certain moral (principals/principles).

      Ninety-nine per cent chose the right answer (principles) in number two.

    • 3. The (principal/principle) character in the play is ill.

      In number three, eighty-two per cent chose the right answer (principal).

    • 4. His political (principals/principles) are less than acceptable.

      In number four, ninety-seven per cent chose the right answer (principles).

    • 5. As a matter of (principal/principle), he refused to borrow money from anyone.

      In number five, ninety-seven per cent chose the right answer (principle).

    • 6. The (principal/principle) invested in that project was $100,000.

      Of those participating, eighty-five per cent made the correct choice of (principal) in number six.

    • 7. We must instill into the minds of our youth (principals/principles) of honesty and morality.

      Ninety-seven per cent of participants indicated the right answer (principles) in the last number.

    A few words about the use of mnemonic devices that make it easier to remember how to spell certain words correctly.

    Although many subscribers had different mnemonic devices for determining which principal/principle to use in a sentence, the best mnemonics to use seem to be “main” for principal and “rule” for principle.

    Note the relationship of the “a” in main and principal and the “le” in rule and principle. Always make these relationships and you will always use them correctly.

    Mnemonic [nee MAH nik], as in mnemonic device, comes from the Greek element that means, “memory” or “to remember” and refers to a technique that facilitates making the right choices for words that are otherwise confusing.

    Whenever you want to make sure you have chosen the correct principal/principle, substitute the words main and rule in place of one or the other principal/principle, to see if it makes sense and when it does; it is certain that you have the right choice. For example, in number one, you could say, “The rule reason for this discussion ....” or say, “The main reason for this discussion ....” and you would logically have to choose main or “principal” because the other choice simply doesn’t make any sense.

    So many people have used the mnemonic device of saying, “You spell the principal of the school with pal because he/she is your pal” or something similar to that. I strongly urge that you NOT use this mnemonic because it can be very misleading. It tends to make people think that the use of pal is used only with that particular principal. It is far better to say that the principal of the school is spelled with pal because he/she is the MAIN administrator, teacher, or educator of the school.

    Did you notice the erratum in sentence number seven of the survey. Mea culpa. I used “install” instead of “instill into the minds ....”

    Congratulations to nine subscribers (out of the 412 who participated) who saw and told me about this error (erratum). If there had been more than one erratum, then I would have had to confess to errata.

    Thank you, if you were one of those who contributed to the survey. It was amazing to see that MOST of the participants made no errata in their submissions. I apparently have a VERY knowledgeable list of subscribers!

    This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #05 (page 1)
    R.I.P., requiescat in pace
    may he/she rest in peace

    The plural form of this final thought is requiescant in pace, "may they rest in peace". The abbreviation for both the singular and the plural is R.I.P.

    This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 3)
    same sum everytime in mathematics
    You can get the same sum of 1,089 every time you add certain numbers together:
    1. Take any three-digit number in which the first digit is larger then the last digit (654).
    2. Reverse the number and subtract the smaller number from the larger one (456; 654 - 456 = 198).
    3. Reverse the result and add this number to the result (198 reversed = 891 + 198 = 1,089)
    4. As shown above, the answer is 1,089 every time you use the procedures as indicated.
    This entry is located in the following unit: Measurements and Mathematics Terms (page 9)
    The 106-year-old Virginia McLaurin, an African-American, was very excited to meet the Obamas in the White House and she was dancing with joy.

    Ms. McLaurin was invited as part of a Black History Month celebration. “I thought I would never live to get into the White House and I tell you I am so happy to have a black president,” she said to the smiling Barack Obama and the first lady, Michelle Obama.

    Click on this link: to see the video posted by the White House as Virginia McLaurin opens her arms wide and greets Obama with an excited "Hi!".

    This entry is located in the following unit: Videos (page 1)
    Words at Work in the Print Media: INDEX

    Lists of words being used in news media headlines, subheadings, and excerpts from applicable articles.

    This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 2)
    Words in the news

    In the December 28, 1998, issue of the International Herald Tribune in the William Safire column called, "Language", he wrote: "Now to the alleged mistake that drew the most mail. In a line about the pronunciation of status, I wrote, 'That is usually pronounced STAT-us, as in statistics, by the highfalutin, and STATE-us by the hoi polloi.' "

    "From Jim Tart of Dallas: 'My daughter Katie tells me that her eighth-grade teacher would have smacked her in the head with her grammar book had she said 'the hoi polloi'. Katie says hoi polloi means "the masses", and therefore should never be proceeded by the. Live by the sword and die by the sword."


    Thank you, Mr. Tart. (And when Katie comes by with her spelling book opened to preceded, watch your head.)

    This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #05 (page 1)
    Words Used in Headings as Seen in a Variety of Publications

    Lists of groups about Words Used in Printed Media Headings as seen in various media publications.

    This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 2)
    zenith in astronomy
    A point on the celestial sphere directly above an observer on the earth.

    The point 180° opposite the zenith, directly underfoot, is the nadir and the astronomical zenith is defined by gravity; that is, by sighting up a plumb line.

    If the line were not deflected by such local irregularities in the earth’s mass as mountains, it would point to the geographic zenith.

    Because the earth rotates and is not a perfect sphere, the geocentric zenith is slightly different from the geographic zenith except at the Equator and the poles.

    Geocentric zenith is the intersection with the celestial sphere of a straight line drawn through the observer’s position from the geometric center of the earth.

    This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 28)