You searched for: “ex
(Greek: out of, out, outside; away from; used as a prefix)
(Latin: a prefix occurring in words of Latin origin used in the senses: out, out of, from; upward; completely, entirely; to remove from, deprive of; without; former [said of previous holders of office or dignity])
(Greek: outer, outside, external; used as a prefix)
Word Entries containing the term: “ex
ab extra; ab ex. (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the outside; from without."

The infection pervading in the hospital appears to have originated ab extra or ab ex..

Avarus non implebitur pecunia; et qui amat divitias, fructum non capiet ex eis. (Latin)
Translation: "He that loveth silver will not be satisfied with silver, nor he that loveth abundance with increase."

From the Old Testament: Ecclesiastes, V, 10 (c. 250 B.C.). It is probably the origin of "The More he has, the more he wants."

It is said that the multimillionaire, John D. Rockefeller, was once asked, "How much money does it take to make a man happy?" His response: "Just a little more!"

deus ex machina
A god [or dea, goddess] out of a machine.

A person or thing that suddenly resolves a problem or a device providing a contrived resolution in a play. In Greek, or Roman dramas, this was a device by which a god appeared on the stage at a crucial moment to help solve the dilemma. Now it refers to a person or thing that solves a problem in a drama by some artificial or abrupt means.

The expression has its origin in ancient Greek theater, especially in certain plays by Euripides. When the complexities of plot and character appeared incapable of resolution, a god was set down on stage by a mechanical crane or derrick to sort out things and make them right.

The appearance, or epiphany, of the god or goddess was interpreted by some critics, notably the Roman poet Horace, as proof that Euripides (or some other dramatist) had so piled up the complications in the plot that he needed divine intervention to untangle the situation. The resultant meaning has evolved into a situation where a person or thing that solves a difficulty artificially and abruptly is called a deus, or dea, ex machina.

To provide the story's well-chopped ending, a deus ex machina from the Internal Revenue Department is rolled on to the scene to claim so much in back taxes and penalties that the contestants for the estate have no alternative but to kiss and make up.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 3)
ec-, ex- (Greek)
out
ex aequo et bono
According to what is just and good; equitably.

This phrase refers to what a person of principle will do.

This entry is located in the following units: bon- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4)
ex animo (adverb), more ex animo, most ex animo
Referring to how something is considered wholeheartedly or earnestly from the heart; sincerely: Sharon was convinced ex animo that she would do well with the final exam in biology when it would take place at the end of the semester.
This entry is located in the following units: anima-, anim- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4)
ex capite (s) (noun)
Out of the head; from the head: "Memory is ex capite because it comes from the head."
ex cathedra
From the chair or throne, with authority.

1. Dogmatic utterances of the pope on matters of faith and morals when he is seated on his "holy" throne: spoken with an infallible voice as the successor and representative of St. Peter.

2. When experts speak authoritatively on matters in their fields of knowledge, we may say that they speak ex cathedra or that they have made ex cathedra statements.

3. The term is sometimes applied to the arrogant, positive expressions of the uninformed when they speak as if they were representing some high authority in their dogmatic pronouncements.

Eugene Ehrlich pointed out that before the cathedra was the pope's chair; even before there were popes, it was the chair of a teacher. Based on information from Eugene Ehrlich in his Amo, Amas, Amat and More; Harper & Row, Publishers; New York; 1985.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4)
ex curia
Out of court.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4)
Ex desuetudina amittuntur privilegia.
By disuse are privileges lost.

A legal maxim, also freely translated as: "Use it or lose it."

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4)
ex gratia
Out of goodness.

Referring to a payment made as a favor, not as an obligation.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4)
ex libris
From the books.

Phrase used before the owner's name on bookplates.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 5) libr-, libel + (page 1)
ex luna scientia (Latin)
Translation: "From the moon, knowledge."

The words, ex luna scientia were inscribed on the mission patch worn on the uniforms of the crew of Apollo 13.

The phrase was the motto of the moon mission and was derived from ex scientia tridens, the motto of Jim Lovell's Alma Mater, the United States Naval Academy.

Jim Lovell was a former NASA astronaut and a retired captain in the United States Navy, who was most famous as the commander of the Apollo 13 mission, which suffered a critical failure on the way to the moon, but it was brought back safely to earth with the skills of the crew and the mission control staff.

This entry is located in the following unit: luna, luni-, lun-, lunu- (page 1)
Ex mero motu.
Of one's own free will; without compulsion or restraint.

A legal term also meaning "of his own accord; voluntarily" and "without prompting or request". Equivalent terms are sua sponte or exproprio motu.

ex more
According to custom.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 5)
Ex nihilo nihil fit.
Nothing comes from nothing.

This Latin phrase is applied broadly and may suggest that a dull mind can not be expected to produce great thoughts. The first-century Roman poet, Lucretius, wrote in De Rerum Natura about the creation of the world in which he said, Nil posse creari de nilo, "Nothing can be created out of nothing."

Another version is also given as Ex nihilo nihil fit suggesting that every effect must have a cause or that the world, for example, could not have been made from nothing.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 5) nihil- (page 1)
ex officio
By virtue of an office; by virtue of one's office.

Officers of an institution often serve on many of the organizations' committees, not because they have special qualifications that are needed on the committees, but because they hold certain offices in the organization. A chief executive officer of a corporation may be a member ex officio of all the important committees of that company.

ex post facto
Arising or enacted after the fact, retroactive.

An ex post facto law is one which sets a penalty for an act that was not illegal at the time it was performed. Such laws are forbidden by the United States Constitution.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 5) post- (page 1)
Ex scientia tridens.
Out of knowledge, a trident.

Motto of the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, USA.

ex ungue leonem
From a claw, the lion.

You may tell the lion by its claws or from a sample we can judge the whole.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 5) ungu- + (page 1)
Omnium autem rerum, ex quibus aliquid acquiritur, nihil est agri cultura melius, nihil uberius, nihil dulcius, nihil homini libero dignius.
Translation: "Of all the occupations in which gain is secured, none is better than agriculture, none more profitable, none more delightful, none more becoming to a freeman."

This motto, written by Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), is also reproduced in a shorter version in the entrance foyer of the Museum of Hungarian Agriculture: Nihil melius nihil homine libero dignius, quam agricultura.

Quasi ex contractu.
In law, "as if from or by contract".
Qui ex patre filioque procedit.
Who proceedeth from the Father and the Son.

The words and the Son were not included in the original Nicene Creed. The later insertion of these words occasioned the Filioque dispute; that is, one of the apparently irreconcilable differences between the Latin and Greek Orthodox churches.

This entry is located in the following units: fili- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group Q (page 2)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “ex
Ex nihilo nihil fit.
Out of nothing, nothing is made.
Nothing comes from nothing.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 2)
Ex voto.
According to one's wishes.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 2)