You searched for: “et
(euphemisms, question-begging, declarifications, and cloudy vagueness sometimes designed to make lies sound truthful)
(French: a suffix; small)
(French: small, little)
(African Safari, Tanzania, et al.; December, 1963)
(African Safari, Tanzania, et al.; December, 1963)
(African Safari, Tanzania, et al.; December, 1963)
(African Safari, Tanzania, et al.; December, 1963)
(Latin: nephew; grandson, grandchild; descendant [family member]; nepotism, et al.)
(Wilfred Owen challenges our thinking about whether it is really so sweet and fitting to die for one's country)
Word Entries containing the term: “et
a Deo et Rege
From God and the King.

Some monarchs saw themselves as direct representatives of God on earth, so documents issued by them were often signed a Deo et Rege.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 1)
Ab hoc et ab hac et ab illa. (Latin term)
Translation: "From this man, this woman, and that woman."

Also translated as, "From here, there, and everywhere."

The talk of gossips; as, such and such a person did or said this or that, is also known as ab hoc et ab hac et ab illa.

A statement which characterizes something heard or said in general gossip with no indication of its precise source is called an ab hoc et ab hac et ab illa.

Fritz was not prepared to rely on ab hoc et ab hac et ab illa information because he wanted to check out the data and make sure it was accurate.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 3)
Ab officio et beneficio (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From official (duties) and benefits."

A suspension from a job and the remunerations or pay which come with it.

Affavit Deus et dissipantur.
God breathed and they were put to flight.

This is one version of an inscription on a medal struck in commemoration of the destruction of the Spanish Armada in 1588. The inscription was also given as Flavit Jehovah et dissipati sunt (Jehovah breathed and they were dispersed).

Although the Spanish were doing battle with the English fleet, under the leadership of Sir Frances Drake, it is recorded that powerful storms at sea during the period of the battle were of great assistance in destroying the Spanish fleet. So the idea of divine intervention had validity for them.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 12)
Amare et sapere vix deo conceditur.
Even a god finds it hard to love and be wise at the same time.
This entry is located in the following unit: vix-, vixi- (page 1)
Amore et tilmore. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Through love and fear."

Motto of German Emperor Joseph I (1705-1711).

This entry is located in the following units: amat-, amor-, am- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 15)
Animo et fide. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Through soul and faith."

Motto of Pensacola Jr. College, Pensacola, Florida, USA.

arte et animo
By skill and courage.
This entry is located in the following units: art-, arti- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 19)
arte et labore
By skill and toil (work).
Avarus non implebitur pecunia; et qui amat divitias, fructum non capiet ex eis. (Latin)
Translation: "He that loveth silver will not be satisfied with silver, nor he that loveth abundance with increase."

From the Old Testament: Ecclesiastes, V, 10 (c. 250 B.C.). It is probably the origin of "The More he has, the more he wants."

It is said that the multimillionaire, John D. Rockefeller, was once asked, "How much money does it take to make a man happy?" His response: "Just a little more!"

Bonitatem et disciplinam et scientiam doce me.
Teach me goodness and discipline and knowledge.

Motto of Marycrest College, Davenport, Iowa, USA; and College of Mount Saint Vincent, Riverdale, New York, USA.

Motto of College of Mount Saint Vincent, Riverdale, New York, USA.

Bonitatem et disciplinam et scientiam doce me.
Teach me goodness and discipline and knowledge.

Motto of College of Mount Saint Vincent, Riverdale, New York, USA.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group B (page 1)
Caret initio et fine.
It lacks beginning and end.

A statement that can be used by an editor or a literary critic reviewing a poorly written product.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 2)
Cave quid dicis, quando, et cui.
Beware what you say, when, and to whom.

Certainly good advice for all of us; especially, when writing e-mail. Recent studies have shown that e-mail messages may stay recorded somewhere for years and be available for others to read long after we thought they no longer existed.

A case in point is Bill Gates whose videotaped deposition for the federal trial in the United States revealed that he couldn't remember sending an e-mail about Microsoft’s plans to use Apple Computer to "undermine Sun".

Reading about, "The Tale of the Gates Tapes" in the November 16, 1998, issue of Time, the writer Adam Cohen, wrote, "Trouble was, it was a difficult line to swallow. Gates as a fuzzy-headed amnesiac? This is the man revered even by the geniuses who roam Microsoft’s Redmond, Washington, campus for his awesome 'bandwidth' (geekspeak for intelligence)."

This entry is located in the following unit: Quotes: Latin Phrases (page 1)
Christo et humanitati. (Greek)
For Christ and humanity.

Motto of Blackburn College, Carlinville, Illinois, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: homo-, hom-, hum- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 3)
Consilio et industria. (Latin motto)
Translation: "By reason and industry."

Motto of German Emperor Leopold I (1658-1705).

constantia et diligentia
By perseverance and diligence.

A motto of fortitude and steadfastness.

Constantia et fortitudine.
Through perseverance and bravery.

Motto of German Emperor Charles VI (1711-1740).

This entry is located in the following units: fort-, forc- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 4)
Crescite et multiplicamini.
Increase and multiply.

Motto of the state of Maryland, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 5) multi-, mult- (page 1)
Dat eleemosynam et ecce omnia munda sunt vobis. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Give alms and lo, all pure things are yours!

Someone was told that the motto of Wyggesden School, Leicester, U.K., Dat eleemosynam et ecce omnia munda sunt vobis must be memorized by all the students before they are allowed to graduate.

Decus et veritas.
Glory and truth.

Motto of Rockford College, Rockford, Illinois, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 2) veri-, ver- (page 1)
Divide et impera. (Latin maxim)
Translation: "Divide and rule."

1. A reference to the policy of stirring up dissension and rivalries within the ranks of one's enemies, as Caesar did in Gaul and elsewhere.

2. This ancient political maxim, adopted by Machiavelli, is also given as Divide ut regnes and as Divide ut imperes, all of which mean "divide [the opposition] in order to rule" or "divide and conquer".

Docendum et discendum. (Latin motto)
Translation: "To be taught and to learn."

Motto of Blackheath Proprietary School, UK.

This entry is located in the following units: doc-, doct- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 4)
Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.
It is sweet and proper (fitting or honorable) to die for one's country.

A carving in stone over the entrance to the Amphitheater at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia; based on a writing by Horace in his Odes, III, ii, 13.

Dulce et Decorum Est

—by Wilfred Owen, 1893-1918

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame, all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! quick, boys! An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime.—
Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams before my helpless sight
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin,
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gurgling from the froth-corrupted lungs
Bitten as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori
.

Dulce (sweet)? Decorum (honorable)? Wilfred Owen himself died fighting for England in World War I, just one week before the armistice was signed and the war ended.

Dum felis dormit, mus gaudet et exsilit antro.
When the cats fall asleep, the mouse rejoices and leaps from his hole.

Latin idiom: The Roman mouse rejoicing is father to the French mice dancing and the English mice playing.

This entry is located in the following units: dorm-, dormi- (page 2) gaud- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 4)
Durum et durum non faciunt murum. (Latin proverb)
Translation: "Hard and hard will not make a wall."

A medieval jingle: Some soft substance must unite the hard things to hold them together.

This entry is located in the following units: duro-, dur-, dura- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 4)
Ecclesiae et litteris.
For the church and literature.

Motto of King College, Bristol, Tennessee, USA.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 1)
Ego sum rex Romanus (imperator Romanorum) et super grannaticam. (Latin statement)
Translation: "I am the king of Rome and above grammar."

Words spoken by the Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund at the Council of Constance (1414-1418) when a cardinal corrected his Latin.

This entry is located in the following units: ego (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 1) par-, para- (page 1)
Ego sum via veritas et vita.
I am the way, the truth, and the life.

Motto seen over the entrance to St. Steven's Basilica in Budapest, Hungary.

Eruditio et meritum pro omnibus.
Learning and benefit for all.

Motto of Isothermal Community College, Spindale, North Carolina, USA.

Esto bonus et pius ne sit leo te magis impavidus.
Be good and pious, let not the lion be more undaunted than thou.
This entry is located in the following units: bon- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 2)
et al.
The abbreviation for et alii (masculine or common gender), et aliae (feminine), et alia (neuter): "and others".

This abbreviation is used primarily in writing to avoid making a long listing. When referring to "and other men", et alii should be used when it is preceded by the name of a male or when it means "and other people" (including both males and females).

If there is a woman's name and a writer wants to have the meaning of "and other women", then he/she may use et aliae.

If a thing (neuter gender) is written and there is a list of other non-masculine and non-feminine items (things) listed, then et alia is considered the proper term for "and other things".

One source said that "educated people" do not pronounce the abbreviateion et al.; instead, it is suggested that it is better to say, "and others" in place of et al. when speaking.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 3)
Et bonum quo antiquius, eo melius.
The more ancient a good, the better.
This entry is located in the following units: bon- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 3)
et cetera; etc.
Meaning: "and so forth"; and the "other things" (not people).

It is redundant to say or to write "and et cetera" (meaning: "and and so forth") since et means "and".

When speaking, the abbreviation, etc. is not pronounced by itself; instead, the full phrase is pronounced. One should say, et cetera (et SET uhr uh [English] or et KAY teh ruh [Latin]).

There is a quote from 1578 by a John Florio, who said, "The heaviest thing that is, is one Etcetera [sic]." It was considered the heaviest because it implied a number of unspecified things, too numerous to mention. Lawyers' etceteras [sic], in their bills of costs, were proverbial. The French had a saying, "Heaven protect us from a lawyer's etceteras [sic]." The same admonition could refer to misc. or "miscellaneous".

Beware of etc. because it can be the costliest item in an expense account. It is also considered to be a sign used in an effort to make others believe that someone knows more than he/she does in reality.

"Etc." is a perfect word to write when you can't think of the right one.
—Anonymous

"Etc."
Here's a three-letter word
Used by more than a few
To make people think
They know more than they do.
—Richard Armour

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 3)
Et docere et rerum exquirere causas.
To teach and to inquire into the nature of things.

Motto of the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: caus- (page 2) doc-, doct- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 3)
et hoc genus omne
And everything of the kind; and all that sort.

This phrase is used to indicate others of the same class of persons or things; such as, "and all that sort of thing" and is considered by one source as "a pretentious substitute for et cetera, etc.".

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 3)
et nunc et semper
Now and forever; from now on.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 3)
et sequens (adverb); et sequentia; et seq.; seq.; sq.
And the following or and what follows (items in a list or in page references): "Simone was reading the definitions for words and came across 'Learn the words in this unit and compare them et seq. with the list in next unit.' "
Et sic de similibus (Latin phrase)
Translation: "And so of similar (people or things); and that goes for the others, too."

This phrase is used to suggest that whatever has been spoken about one person or topic under discussion holds true for related matters as well. The phrase ab uno disce omnes has similarities: "from one example, learn about all" or "from one, learn all".

Et tu, Brute!
And you [too], Brutus!

Was it really, "Et tu Brute!"?

According to the Roman historian, Suetonius (Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus, c. 69-c. 140A.D.): "When they saw that Caesar had settled in his place, the conspirators stood around him as if to do him honor, and immediately Tullius Cimber, who had taken the lead, stepped closer as if to make some request, When Caesar seemed to take offense, and with a gesture put him off until another time, Cimber caught hold of his toga at both shoulders. At this Caesar cried out, ‘This is violence!', whereupon one of the two Cascas attacked him frontally, wounding him a little beneath the throat. …And so he was stabbed with three and twenty wounds, having uttered no word save one groan upon the first thrust; some have written, however, that as Marcus Brutus came running upon him, he cried in Greek, kai su, teknon, ‘And thou, my son?'"

In an earlier account by Plutarch (Greek, Ploutarchos, c. A.D. 46-A.D. c. 120; Greek historian, biographer and philosopher), Caesar said nothing, but only pulled his toga over his head.

—From Michael Macrone's It's Greek to Me!; Harper Collins Publishers; 1991, page 178.

Included in Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar, in which Caesar's last words were expressed by his shock as Brutus (supposedly Caesar's trusted ally) stabbed him after the other assasins had already mortally wounded him.

This quotation reflects Shakespeare's version of the death of Caesar. Now, Et tu Brute! has become the classic recognition of betrayal by a trusted friend.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4)
et uxor; et ux.
Translation: "And wife."

This is a legal phrase and abbreviation for "and wife."

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4) uxor- (page 1)
et vir
And man; and husband.

This is a legal phrase for "and husband".

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4)
ex aequo et bono
According to what is just and good; equitably.

This phrase refers to what a person of principle will do.

This entry is located in the following units: bon- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 4)
Fac et excusa.
Do it and make excuses later.

Also, "Make your move." This is a motto for those who want to be a success in life.

This entry is located in the following units: caus- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group F (page 1)
Fac et spera.
Do and hope.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group F (page 1)
Fide et literis. (Latin motto)
Translation: "By faith and by letters."

Motto of St. Paul's School, London, U.K.

This entry is located in the following units: fid-, fidel- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group F (page 3)
Fides et justitia. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Faith and justice."
Fortitudo et justitia invictae sunt.
Fortitude and justice are invincible.
Fumum et opes strepitumque Romae.
A Latin statement: "The smoke, the wealth, and the din of Rome."
—Juvenal
This entry is located in the following unit: fumi-, fum- (page 3)
Gratia et veritas.
Grace and truth.

Motto of Luther Theological Seminary, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group G (page 1) veri-, ver- (page 1)
Habet et musca splenem.
Even a fly has a spleen.

The Romans believed anger was centered in the spleen, and we still cling idiomatically to that conception. An English version might be, "The worm turns." In France and Spain, "The ant has its ire." In Italy, "Even the fly has its fury." Poland has an idiom that says, "Even a fly has a belly." This seems to say that the least among us has hunger and aspirations; as well as, rage.

Hic et ubique terrarum.
Here, there, and everywhere.

Motto of the University of Paris, France. Could the translation also be, "Here, there, and throughout the earth"?

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group H (page 1)
Hinc lucem et pocula sacra. (Latin motto)
Translation: "[From] here [we receive] light and sacred draughts [libations]."

Motto of Cambridge University, U.K. It is also translated as, "Hence light and the sacred draughts [of wisdom]."

According to the Queens' College Web site (one of the colleges associated with Cambridge University), "[From] here [we receive] light and sacred draughts. The 'here' being the University (or the Alma Mater, nursing mother), and 'light and sacred draughts' being metaphors for knowledge."

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group H (page 1) sacr-, sacro- (page 1)
Honestas et diligentia.
Honesty and diligence.

Motto of Suffolk University Law School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

In fide, justitia, et fortitudine.
In faith, justice, and strength.

Motto of the Order of St. George, Bavaria, Germany.

In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.
We enter the circle after dark and are consumed by fire.

A Latin palindrome that describes the movement of moths.

inter canem et lupum
Between the dog and the wolf, twilight.
Juste et clementer.
With justice and clemency.

Motto of Johann Georg, Elector of Brandenburg (1525-1598)

Labor et scientia.
Labor and knowledge.

Motto of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute, Indiana, USA.

Laborare et studere.
Work and study.

Motto of Lincoln University, Jefferson City, Missouri, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: labor-, laborat- + (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group L (page 1)
Levator labii superioris et nasi. (Latin term)
Translation: "Lifter of the upper lip and the nose."

A medical term for the muscle in the upper lip.

Lex pro urbe et orbe.
Law for the city and the world.

Motto of the Vermont Law School, South Royalton, Vermont, USA.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group L (page 2)
libertas et fidelitate
Freedom and loyalty.

Motto on the seal of the State of West Virginaia, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: fid-, fidel- (page 4) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group L (page 2) liber- (page 2)
Lux et fides.
Light and faith.

Motto of Taylor University, Upland, Indiana, USA.

Lux et scientia.
Light and knowledge.

Motto of Andrew College, Cuthbert, Georgia, USA.

Lux et Veritas.
Light and Truth.

Yale University seal motto, New Haven, Connecticut, USA; and also the motto of Waldorf College, Forest City, Iowa, USA.

Magna est veritas et praevalebit.
Great is truth and it will prevail.
This entry is located in the following unit: magni-, magn-; magna (page 1)
Magna est veritas et praevalet.
Great is truth, and it prevails.
This entry is located in the following unit: magni-, magn-; magna (page 1)
Memento ut diem sabbati sanctifices. Sex diebus operaberis, et facies omnia opera tua. Septimo autem die sabbatum Domini Dei tui est.
Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labor and do all thy work: but the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God.

As written in the Old Testament of the Bible, Exodus: xx, 8-10 (c. 700 B.C.). Also see Deuteronomy: v, 12.

Mens et manus. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Mind and hand."

A motto of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA; and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA.

mente et artificio
Through mind and skill.

A motto of Ryerson Polytechnical Institutue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group M (page 3) menti-, ment- (page 2)
Mortuo leoni et lepores insultant.
The lion dies and even the hares insult him.

Latin idiom: A contrary statement of the Roman, De mortuis nil nisi bonum, "Let nothing but good be said of the dead."

Mundus vult decipi et decipiatur. (Latin motto)
Translation: "The world wants to be deceived and [then] let it be deceived."

An alternate modern application includes, "There are fools born every minute so take advantage of their stupidity."

Nam et ipsa scientia potestas est.
For knowledge, too, is itself power; knowledge is power.
Nemo debet bis vexari [si constet curie quod sit] pro una et eadem causa.
No one ought to be twice troubled or harassed [if it appear to the court that it is] for one and the same cause.

No one can be sued a second time for the same cause of action, if once judgment has been rendered. No one can be held to bail a second time at the suit of the same plaintiff for the same cause of action.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group N (page 1)
Obstupui, steteruntque comae, et vox faucibus haesit. (Latin)
Translation: "I was stupefied, and my hair stood on end, and my voice stuck to my throat."

A description of the physical effects of fear, from Virgil's Aeneid; with an equivalent meaning of, "I was scared stiff."

panem et circenses
Bread and circuses.

The cry of the Roman mob for food and entertainment. -Juvenal.

Food and amusements were said to be the sole interests of the common Romans and the rulers of Rome used this as a means of keeping the masses "satisfied" instead of coming up with real solutions to their economic problems.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 1)
Patienter et constanter.
Patiently and steadfastly.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 1)
Patientia et perseverantia.
With patience and perseverance.
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 1) persever- + (page 1)
Pax et felicitas semper omnibus.
Peace and happiness always to all.

This motto came from a reader who said, "I have a tatoo that reads 'PAX ET FELICITAS SEMPER OMNIBUS'. See if any of your subscribers can translate that."

I sent him the translation above; as well as, the following:

"Peace and good fortune (or success) always to everyone."

-John Robertson
Pax et justitia.
Peace and justice.

Motto of Johann Georg II, Elector of Saxony (1613-1680).

This entry is located in the following units: jus-, just-, jur- (page 5) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 2)
Pereunt et Imputantur.
The days pass and are reckoned to our account.

Motto on The Exeter Clock in Exeter, England.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 4) per- (page 5)
Perstare et praestare.
To preserve and surpass.

Motto of New York University, New York, New York. USA.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 4)
Pie et juste.
With piety and justice.

Motto of August Friedrich, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp (1646-1705).

This entry is located in the following units: jus-, just-, jur- (page 5) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 5)
Pietas et justitia principatus columnae.
Piety and justice are the supports of government.

Motto of Adolf Friedrich I, Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1588-1658).

Pietate, fide, et justicia.
With piety, fidelity, and justice.

Motto of Wilhelm VI, Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel (1629-1663).

Poem: Dulce et Decorum Est
A World War I poem that asks if it is truly sweet and fitting to die for one's country.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Pro Christo et humanitate.
For Christ and humanity.

Motto of Olivet College, Olivet, Michigan, USA.

Pro Christo et patria.
For Christ and country.

Motto of Geneva College, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, USA.

Pro Christo et Republica.
For Christ and the Republic.

Motto of Birmingham-Southern College, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.

Pro Deo et ecclesia.
For God and church.
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 7) pro-, por-, pur- (page 1)
Pro Deo et patria.
For God and country.

Motto of the University of Dayton School of Law, Dayton, Ohio, USA; as well as, Loras College, Dubuque, Iowa, USA.

Pro ecclesia et patria.
For church and country.

Motto of Trinity College, Harford, Connecticut, USA.

Pro Ecclesia et Pro Patria.
School Motto of St. Albans School at the National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 7)
Pro et con(tra). (Latin phrase)
Translation: "For and against."
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 8) pro-, por-, pur- (page 2)
Pro scientia et religione.
For science and religion.

Motto of Denver University, Colorado, USA.

Probitas laudatur et alget. Criminibus debent hortos praetoria mensas, argentum vetus et stantem extra pocula caprum. (Latin proverb)
Translation: "Honesty is praised and left out in the cold. Gardens, palaces, rich tables, old silver, and those embossed goats on the cups; men owe these to their crimes."

From Decimus Iunius (Junius) Iuvenalis (Juvenalis) (c. A.D. 60-117); Saturae, I, 74; who attacked the vices of the plutocrats, the wickedness and immorality of women and foreigners (particularly Greeks), and grieves about the decline of the ancient aristocratic virtues.

Prompte et sincere. (Latin expression)
Translation: "Prompt and sincere."

Motto of Calvin Theological Seminary, Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA.

Prudenter et constanter.
Prudently and steadfastly.
Pulchritudo et salubritas.
Beauty and health.
This entry is located in the following unit: pulchri- + (page 1)
Pulvis et umbra (sumus).
We are but dust and shadow.
Qui me amat, amat et canem meam.
Who loves me loves my dog as well.

A Latin statement informing the world that everyone will have to accept you as you are and has the alternative translation of "Love me, Love my dog."

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group Q (page 2)
Quoniam mille anni ante oculos tuos, tanquam dies hesterna, quae praeteriit, et custodio in nocte.
A thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night.

From the Old Testament, Psalms 90:4.

Religio, libertas et scientia.
Religion, liberty, and knowledge.

Motto of Cedar Crest College, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA.

Religioni et bonis artibus.
For religion and the liberal arts.

Motto of St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

Sancte et sapienter.
With holiness and wisdom.

Motto of King's College School, London, U.K.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group S (page 1) sanct-, sancti- (page 1)
Sapientia et doctrina.
Wisdom and teaching.

Motto of Fordham University, New York, New York, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: doc-, doct- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group S (page 1)
Satius est ratioine aequitatis mortem oppetere quam fugere et inhoneste vivere.
It is better to die for a good cause than to flee and live without honor.

Motto of Otto I, "The Great" (936-973). The son of Henry I, Otto I was crowned king at Aachen, Germany, in 936 and received the imperial crown in Rome in 962. With this action, the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, regarded as the legitimate successor of the Roman Empire, was established.

In 955, he ended the Magyar menace with a victory at the battle of Lechfeld near Augsburg. He asserted his authority over the church of the country; German bishoprics everywhere were headed by bishops loyal to him. He is buried in the cathedral of Magdeburg, Germany.

Scientia et industria cum probitate.
Knowledge and diligence with uprightness.

Motto of Lincoln College, Canterbury, New Zealand.

Scientia et pietas.
Knowledge and piety.

Motto of Wesleyan College, Macon, Georgia, USA.

Scientia et sapientia.
Knowledge and wisdom.

Motto of Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, Illinois, USA.

Scribendi recte sapere est et principium et fons.
Knowledge is the prime source of good writing.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group S (page 2)
Semper et ubique.
Always and everywhere.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group S (page 3)
sine loco et anno
Without place and date.

Used in reference to a book that does not provide information concerning its place and date of publication. Normally, modern books supply such information.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group S (page 5) loco- (page 4)
Studiis et rebus honestis.
Through studies and upright affairs.

Motto of the University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA.

Studio optimae doctrinae et saluti sanitatis. (Latin motto)
Translation: "[Dedicated] to the pursuit of educational excellence and the preservation of health."

Motto of Logan College of Chiropractic, Chesterfield, Missouri, USA.

Tempora mutantur nos et mutamur in illis. (Latin term)
Translation: "Times change and we change with them."

Attributed to John Owen who died in 1622, a Welshman known for his Latin epigrams.

Tene mensuram et respice finem. (Latin proverb)
Translation: "Be moderate, think of the consequences."

Motto of German Emperor Maximilian I (1493-1519).

Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes.
I fear the Greeks [ancient name Danai], even when bearing gifts.

Another version, "When an enemy appears friendly, watch out" or better known as, "Beware of Greeks bearing gifts."

The Latin advice was recorded by Virgil, in his Aeneid, and is addressed to the men of Troy. The Trojans were told by one of their priests to mistrust the huge wooden horse left behind by the departing soldiers of Greece, supposedly as an offering to the gods to secure safe passage for Ulysses during his return to Greece.

Ignoring the advice, the Trojans didn't examine the horse-structure, but dragged it into their city. Unknown to the Trojan citizens, the horse contained a contingent of Greek soldiers who were able to open the city gates so many other Greek troops were able to destroy Troy. To this day, "a Trojan horse" is a thing or person that subverts from within an organization or group.

Even in computer science, the term "Trojan horse" is used to refer to a set of instructions hidden inside a legitimate program, causing a computer to perform illegitimate or destructive functions.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group T (page 3) timi-, tim- (page 1)
Ubi est thesaurus tuus, ibi est et cor tuum.
Where your treasure is, there is your heart also. [Vulgate, Matthew 6:21].
This entry is located in the following units: the-; them-, themat-, thes-, thet- + (page 3) thesaur- (page 1) ubi- (page 1)
urbi et orbi
To the city [Rome] and the world.

A papal statement or pronouncement made in behalf of the Roman Catholic Church. This is also the motto of Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, USA.; but it is translated: "For the city and the world."

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group U (page 2)
Ut te cognoscant et vitam habeant.
So that they may know you and have life.

Motto of the Sacred Heart School of Theology, Hales Corners, Wisconsin, USA.

velis et remis
With sails and oars.

Meaning, "an all-out effort". Also presented as remis velisque.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group V (page 1)
verbatim et litteratim
Word for word and letter for letter; accurately rendered. Sometimes this phrase is written as: verbatim et litteratim et punctatim; or as, "Word for word and letter for letter and point for point."
Veritas et virtus.
Truth and virtue.

Motto of Mississippi College, Clinton, Mississippi, USA.

Veritatis et acquitatis tenax.
Perservering in truth and justice.
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group V (page 2) veri-, ver- (page 4)
Via veritas et vita.
The way, the truth, and the life.

Motto of Felician College, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Vide et crede.
See and believe.

Perhaps better known as, "Seeing is believing".

Virtute et armis.
By virtue and arms.

Motto of the State of Mississippi, USA.

Virtute et Exemplo.
By Virtue and Example.

Motto of German Emperor Joseph II (1765-1790).

Virtute et fide.
By virtue and faith.
Volens et potens.
Willing and able.

Motto on the original State seal of Nevada, USA.

Vox et praeterea nihil. (Latin)
Translation: "A voice and nothing more."

"Empty words; a threat but nothing more."

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group V (page 8) nihil- (page 2)
XXI; unus et viginti, unetvice(n)simus
Cardinal: twenty-one, Ordinal: twenty-first
This entry is located in the following unit: Roman Numerals + (page 2)
(Latin: war; bellum, war; bellare, to wage war)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “et
et al., et alii
and others
This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 2)
et seq., et sequentes
and the following
This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 2)
Et sequentes (sequentia).
And those that follow.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 2)
Et sic de caeteris.
And so of the rest.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 2)
etc., et cetera
and so forth
This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 2)