You searched for: “de
(named for French chemist Charles-Augustin de Coulomb (1736-1806), who devised a method of measuring electrical quantity)
(Latin: from, away from, off; down; wholly, entirely, utterly, complete; reverse the action of, undo; the negation or reversal of the notion expressed in the primary or root word)
(the word internet is now a common noun, not a proper noun)
(Robert Service and E.B. de Vito, two logophiles, express their fondness for words)
(Latin: crooked, crookedness; perverted, vicious, wicked; borrowed through Old French depraver or directly from Latin depravare, "to corrupt"; from de, "completely" + pravus, "crooked")
Word Entries containing the term: “de
Aletheuontes de en Agape.
Speaking the truth in love.

A transliteration of the Greek motto of Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada.

This entry is located in the following units: aletho-, aleth- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 13)
De die in diem. (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From day to day."
This entry is located in the following units: de- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 1)
De duobus malis, minus est semper eligendum.
Of two evils, the lesser is always to be chosen.

Another version is ."Choose the lesser of two evils." Thomas à Kempis, the fifteenth-century theologian, advises us to make the best of a bad situation as we recognize the realities of choosing between less than ideal alternatives.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 1)
de facto (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the fact"; in reality.

Functioning or existing in fact, regardless of legal, or illegal, status. It differentiates that which exists in fact (de facto) from what exists legally (de jure).

De gustibus non est disputandum. (Latin statement)
Translatoin: "About tastes there is no disputing."

This well-known expression suggests that taste is a personal matter. Usually no amount of persuasion can succeed in changing a person's taste so it is better not to argue about matters of personal preference.

This saying is sometimes given as De gustibus et coloribus non disputandum, or more often merely as de gustibus, "concerning tastes".

This entry is located in the following units: de- (page 1) gust-, gusti- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 1)
de jure (adjective)
Sanctioned or according to law; legally: The congress passed an end to de jure segregation.

The head of the government is trying to create a de jure state with one party in charge.

de jure (adverb)
Conforming to a law: "The country was recognizing the new government and it will soon be recognized de jure by all of the world's governments."
This entry is located in the following unit: jus-, just-, jur- (page 1)
De minimis non curat praetor. (Latin statement)
Translation: "A praetor does not occupy himself with petty matters."

Also, "Don't bother me with petty matters." A praetor [PREET uhr] in ancient Rome was a magistrate who assisted the consuls by administering justice and commanding armies.

A related expression is the legal precept: De minimis non curat lex or "The law does not concern itself with trifles" or "The law does not care for, or take notice of, very small or trifling matters"; which is used to justify refusal by a court, particularly an appellate court, to hear a suit, on the basis that a court's time must not be taken up with matters of small importance.

Provision is made under certain criminal statutes for dismissing offenses that are de minimis.

The phrase, de minimis, also explains why income tax payments that are a few dollars short of what they should be are sometimes accepted without any complaint.

De mortuis nihil nisi bonum.
Of the dead, (say) nothing but good.

Another translation: "Speak kindly of the dead." It is believed that Chilon of Sparta, one of the wise men of sixth-century B.C. Greece, is the author of this saying. Keep in mind that this would be a Latin translation of what Chilon said in Greek.

The advice to everyone is to speak well of the recently dead or, if you can not say anything good, to keep quiet.

De nihilo nihil. (Latin statement)
Translation: "Nothing comes from nothing."

It was Persius, the first-century A.D. Roman poet, who stated in his Satires that effort is required to produce anything of value. He also said that anything once produced can not become non-existent again, when he wrote: In nihilum nil posse reverti or "There is nothing that can be reduced to nothing."

This entry is located in the following units: de- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 2) nihil- (page 1)
de novo (Latin phrase)
Translation: "Anew."

Like de integro, de novo is an expression used in describing a fresh start; as in, "I'm sorry about what I said yesterday, let's start de novo."

This entry is located in the following units: de- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group D (page 2)
de profundis
Out of the depths.
de rigueur (Latin phrase)
Extensive translation: "Required by fashion, custom, etiquette, essential, socially obligatory, and strictly required."
This entry is located in the following units: de- (page 1) rigi-, rig- (page 1)
de trop (adjective), more de trop, most de trop
A reference to something that is unreasonable, superfluous, or excessive: The time and the expenses made the preparations for the world olympics a de trop burden for many citizens of the host nation.
Not wanted because of there being too much interference or getting in the way.
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Unwanted and interferring.
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This entry is located in the following unit: de- (page 1)
de-emphasis
1. A reduction in emphasis.
2. The act or process of de-emphasizing.
3. In electronics: a process of reducing the relative amplitude of certain frequencies in a signal that have been exaggerated by preemphasis, restoring the signal to its original form.
de-emphasize (verb), de-emphasizes; de-emphasized; de-emphasizing
1. To make something seem or to appear to be less important or central.
2. To reduce in importance, size, scope, etc.
This entry is located in the following units: de- (page 11) phant-, phanta-, phas-; -phasic, -phant (page 1)
de-escalate, deescalate (verb); de-escalates, deescalates; de-escalated, deescalated; de-escalating, deescalating
1. To diminish in size, magnitude, scope, or intensity: Perhaps because the birth control pill has been on the market, the number of births per year has de-escalated.
2. To reduce the level or intensity of a difficult or dangerous situation: Mrs. Smith tried to de-escalate the conflict between the two students who were about to start a big fight on the schoolyard.
This entry is located in the following units: de- (page 11) scend-, scen-, scand-, scan-, scans- (page 1)
de-escalation, deescalation (s) (noun); de-escalations, deescalations
A decrease in strength, force, or size: The de-escalation of tension between the two countries was exceedingly welcome by the politicians and by the people of both countries!
de-escalatory, deescalatory (adjective); more de-escalatory, more deescalatory; most de-escalatory, most deescalatory
Pertaining to something which decreases in amount, dimension, or forcefulness: Some unsettled conflicts within a family can be considered to be de-escalatory in that some members always talk about what annoys or troubles them.
This entry is located in the following units: de- (page 12) scend-, scen-, scand-, scan-, scans- (page 2)
de-tune
UHF antennas are tuned to receive RFID waves of a certain length from a reader, just as the tuner on the radio in a car changes the antenna to receive signals of different frequencies.

When UHF antenna is close to metal or metallic material, the antenna can be detuned, resulting in poor performance.

This entry is located in the following unit: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID): Definitions (page 3)
Duc, sequere, aut de via decede.
Lead, follow, or get out of the way.
esprit de corps (s) (noun) (no plural form)
1. A feeling of pride, fellowship, and common loyalty shared by the members of a particular group of people.
2. A sense of unity and of shared interests and responsibilities that have been developed by people who are closely associated in a task, a cause, an enterprise, etc.
3. Etymology: from late 18th century French; literally, "spirit of the body".
Et sic de similibus (Latin phrase)
Translation: "And so of similar (people or things); and that goes for the others, too."

This phrase is used to suggest that whatever has been spoken about one person or topic under discussion holds true for related matters as well. The phrase ab uno disce omnes has similarities: "from one example, learn about all" or "from one, learn all".

joie de vivre
1. A keen enjoyment of living.
2. A hearty or carefree enjoyment of life.
This entry is located in the following unit: viva-, vivi-, vivo-, viv- (page 1)
joie de vivre (s) (noun)
Enjoyment of being alive and pleasure of being alive with happiness and a zest for life.
Joy in being alive and a zest for life.
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This entry is located in the following unit: Holiday Greetings; 2012 to 2013 (page 1)
Mer de Glace
French, glacier, "sea of ice" (3.5 mi/5.6 km long; 16 sq mi/41 sq km).

Located in the Haute-Savoie department, Eastern France, on the northern slope of Mont Blanc massif.

It is formed by the junction of three smaller glaciers and extends a few miles North East of Chamonix. There are deep crevasses and high seracs, "ice needles". The glacier is the second-longest glacier in the Alps, after the Aletsch Glacier (the largest glacier in the Alps, covers more than 120 square kilometers [more than 45 square miles] in southern Switzerland).

This entry is located in the following unit: glaci- + (page 2)
Nescio de quo loqueris.
I don't know what you're talking about.
Nil igitur fieri de nilo posse fatendumst.
Therefore we must confess that nothing comes from nothing.
—Titus Lucretius Carus (c.99 to c.55 B.C.)
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group N (page 3)
nom de plume
1. A pseudonym adopted by an author.
2. Etymology: from French nom, "name" + de, "of" + plume, "pen" (or "feather").

The "pen" part comes from "feather" from which pens were made.

This entry is located in the following unit: plum-, plumi-, -plume + (page 1)
nom de plume, pen name, pseudonym
nom de plume (nahm" duh PLOOM) (noun)
A term that applies to authors who do not use their real names: Mark Twain is the nom de plume for the writer Samuel Langhorne Clemens who wrote stories about boys living on the Mississippi River.
pen name (PEN naym") (noun)
The name an author assumes which is not the author's real name: Some women authors in the 1800s used a masculine pen name instead of their own names.
pseudonym (SOOD n im") (noun)
A false or fictitious name: The famous highwayman used a pseudonym so he would not be recognized when he was talking with people at the inn.

The elegant and noble chevalier wrote critical essays under his nom de plume. He thought it was safer to write under a foreign sounding pen name than to attempt to write under a readily recognizable pseudonym.

Rixatur de lana caprina.
He quarrels over goat's hair.

"He quibbles over straws." Fabric woven of wool was prized, fabric woven of goat's hair was not.

This entry is located in the following units: capri-, capr- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group R (page 2)
sang-de-boeuf
Literally "ox-blood", a deep rich red high-temperature glaze found on Chinese ceramics from the ming period and later, imitated in Europe in the 19th century.
This entry is located in the following unit: sangui-, sanguio-, sanguin- (page 2)
Suscipe Terra tuo de corpore sumptum.
Translation: "Receive, O Earth, what was taken from thy body."

Epitaph of Pope Gregory the Great.

Testis de visu preponderat aliis
An eye-witness is preferred to others.
This entry is located in the following unit: vid-, video-, vis-, -vision, -visional, -visionally, visuo-, vu- (page 12)
Testis de visu preponderat aliis.
An eye-witness is preferred to others.

A legal maxim about testimony.

Vivit Leo de Tribu Juda.
The Lion of the Tribe of Judah lives.

Motto of the former kingdom of Ethiopia.

Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “de
coup de grace (s) (noun), coups de grace (pl)
An action or an event that finally ends or destroys something that has been getting weaker or worse: The legislature's decision to stop funding the governor's proposal has administered the coup de grace to any further action on his part.
A decisive finishing stroke.
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This entry is located in the following unit: English Words from French (page 1)
Relating to anything or anyone who is superfluous or in the way and not wanted. (2)
Et sic de caeteris.
And so of the rest.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 2)