You searched for: “by
bi-, buy, by, bye, bye, bye, bye-bye, bye-bye
bi- (BIGH) (adjective)
A prefix meaning "two": Humans are considered to be bipeds; that is, having two feet.

The festival was scheduled to be a biannual affair.

buy (BIGH) (verb)
To acquire the ownership of something, for money or other equivalent; to purchase: Trudy and Chris went to the bank for a loan so they could buy a house.
by (BIGH) (preposition)
Next to; near; beside: Please, put the chair by the table.
bye (BIGH) (interjection)
An informal way of saying "goodbye" or an expression of farewell: Jack said, "Bye! I'll see you tomorrow."

Standing next to the car, the children waved bye to the visitors.

bye (BIGH) (adjective)
A secondary matter, a side issue: Grace made a bye remark that changed Jim's opinions completely regarding buying a new house.
bye (BIGH) (noun)
The position of someone who draws no opponent for a round in a tournament and so advances to the next round: She got a bye into the second round of the tennis tournament.
bye-bye (BIGH-BIGH) (interjection)
A farewell often used by children or when speaking to children: Mother said, "Let's go, Trudy. Say goodbye to grandma and grandpa." Trudy responded by saying, "bye-bye"!
bye-bye (BIGH-BIGH) (adverb)
In the United States, a very informal meaning, to go away, which is used in imitation of children's speech: When the company went bankrupt, investors watched their money go bye-bye.

Vincent went into town to buy a bicycle. He didn't realize it was the bicentennial celebration in town; so, he stood by the monument to watch. Then he saw Stanley, a friend. They chatted and then they waved bye to each other as Stanley was carrying his little son, who smiled and waved bye-bye to Vincent.

(Latin: miscarry, pass away, perish by an untimely birth)
(Latin: a suffix; having the quality of, of the nature of, characterized by, belonging to, resembling)
(Greek > Italian: change; a fee charged by money brokers [changers] for exchanging money)
(Greek: struggle, a contest, to contend for a prize; also, to lead, set in motion, drive, conduct, guide, govern; to do, to act; by extension, pain)
(Latin: suffix; pertaining to, like, of the kind of, relating to, characterized by, belonging to; action of, process of)
(Greek > Latin: [receptacle], vessel, often a blood vessel; "covered by a seed or vessel", a seed vessel; a learned borrowing from Greek meaning "vessel", "container")
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(reconstruction of blood vessels damaged by disease or injury usually performed by inflating a balloon inside the blood vessel lumen (tube) in order to reconstitute the flow of blood)
(Greek: unequal; by extension: unsymmetrical, uneven; dissimilar, unlike)
(Greek: stiff, unmovable; adhesion; by extension, "bent, hooked, crooked, curved, looped")
(Greek: lower extremity of the windpipe; by extension, extremity of the heart, the great artery)
(Latin: consider, judge; spectator, listener, witness; originally, "decided by one's own discretion or judgment")
(a suffix which forms nouns that refer to people who regularly engage in some activity, or who are characterized in a certain way, as indicated by the stem or root of the word; originally, which appeared in Middle English in words from Old French where it expressed an intensive degree or with a pejorative or disparaging application)
(Latin: to be dry; lacking enough water for things to grow, dry and barren; by extension, not interesting, lifeless, dull)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix; a place for; abounding in or connected with something; a place containing or related to that which is specified by the root)
(Greek > Latin: one of the Titans, son of Iapetus and Clymene, supporting the heavens on his shoulders; later, a king of Mauretania, changed by Perseus into Mt. Atlas [Greek mythology])
(Latin: diviner, soothsayer; a member of the college of priests in Rome, who foretold the future; in ancient Rome, a priest who foretold events by interpreting omens)
(Greek > Latin: an ancient Greek and Roman god of wine and revelry; earlier called Dionysus by the Greeks)
(Greek: a step or degree; rank; by steps)
(Greek: deep, depth; the fauna and flora of the bottom of the sea; sea bottom; depth [by extension, this element includes lake, river, and stream bottoms])
(Latin: bile; which is a digestive juice secreted by the liver, stored in the gallbladder, and aids in the digestion of fats)
(Utilizing nature in the present and in the future with engineering designs)
(a bionic hand which is considered a next-generation prosthetic device which appeals to both patients and health care professionals)
(biological theft by illegally collecting indigenous plants, microbes, enzymes, etc. by corporations who patent them for their own commercial use as defined at this bio unit page)
(Greek: mucus; a slippery protective secretion that is produced in the linings of some organs of the body by the mucous membranes and glands)
(by John Godfrey Saxe)
(Greek: windpipe or one of the two large branches of the trachea, the tube in air-breathing vertebrates that conducts air from the throat to the bronchi, strengthened by incomplete rings of cartilage)
(Part 1 of 4: The Ballad of Salvation Bill by Robert W. Service and additional capnomania-fumimania information about smoking or addiction to tobacco smoke from the past to the present)
(Part 2 of 4: "The Ballad of Salvation Bill" by Robert Service was based on experiences he had with a compulsive smoker who just had to smoke because smoking was so important in his life)
(Part 3 of 4: fear and hatred of tobacco smoke and the efforts being made to restrict smoking where those who don't smoke are not adversely affected by those who are smokers)
(Part 4 of 4: smoking in public and the efforts to ban, or to restrict, second-hand smoke that threatens the lives of waiters, waitresses, and innocent customers so they don't have to suffer from the discomfort and health perils presented by smokers)
(Latin: a storeroom, a chamber, a closet; by extension, of or pertaining to a cell, a microscopic protoplasmic mass made up of a nucleus enclosed in a semipermeable membrane)
(Greek: on the ground, low; by extension, "dwarf-like")
(Greek > Latin: formless matter; especially from Greek, gulf, chasm, abyss, the rude unformed mass; and by extension, "confusion and disorder")
(Greek: kheima, winter, frost, winter weather, winter-flowing; by extension, cold, freezing)
(Modern Latin: named by Murie Curie for her native Poland; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: named for the mythical king Tantalus [who in the Greek myths was tortured by being placed in water up to his chin, which he was never able to drink, whence the word “tantalize”]; because of the element’s insolubility or “to illustrate the tantalizing work he had until he succeeded in isolating this element”; metal)
(Greek: khimaira, fabled monster; unreal, fantastic, imaginary, fanciful, unrealistic; however, in medical and other scientific fields, characterized by two or more genetically distinct cell types in one organism)
(Greek: choledochos, from chole, "bile" + dechomai, "to receive"; the common bile duct or tube; conveying bile; containing bile, which is a yellow-green fluid that is made by the liver, stored in the gallbladder, and passes through the common bile duct into the first section of the small intestine or duodenum where it helps to digest fat)
(Greek: disease in which the bodily humors [biles] are subject to violent discharge; characterized by severe vomiting and diarrhea)
(Greek: acquisition of wealth by making money; transacting business to gain wealth; efforts made to possess goods and money; striving to be rich)
(Latin: curl, ringlet; tuft of hair, fringe; by extension, filament, tendril)
(Latin > French: the ability to see things that are out of normal sight but which can be perceived by extrasensory powers)
(Latin: sickness caused by overindulgence of alcohol, food, etc.; drunkeness)
(Greek: hidden, secret, secrets, secret writing; by extension, applied to secret code or ciphers)
(Latin: a by-road, a turn away, go in different directions; branching away from)
(Greek: believe, belief; that which is thought to be true by someone who has the power or right to give orders, make decisions, and to enforce his or her opinions, doctrines, praise, or beliefs)
(Greek > Latin: dragon; a kind of serpent; snake; a kind of fish; by extension, a festering sore)
(Greek: oak tree; by extension, "tree")
(Gaia, Earth goddess of the ancient Greeks, she was called Gaea, Terra Mater, "Earth Mother" by the Romans; third planet from the sun)
(Greek > Latin: electric, electricity; from amber, resembling amber, generated from amber which when rubbed vigorously [as by friction], produced the effect of static electricity)
(Greek ελυτρον > Modern Latin: covering, wrapping; sheath, casing; by extension, vagina)
(Norman Invasion and Conquest by William the Conqueror)
(medicinal plants discovered by traditional societies)
(learning etymologies can multiply your vocabulary easier than by learning lists of words)
(Greek > Latin > French: bind by oath; calling up or driving out of [evil] spirits)
(Latin: root out, to pluck out by the stem or root)
(Latin: to plug up or to cram, to stuff; by extension, practical joke, sham; fiasco)
(Latin: son, and by extension, "daughter; offspring" or "family member")
(Latin: to blow, a puff of wind or air; by extension, accumulation of gas in the stomach or bowels)
(a connection of this and fourteen other Focusing on Words Newsletters are available for your learning opportunities by clicking on the link under the banner)
(Greek: phorbe, fodder, from pherbein, to graze; by extension: fodder, food; any herb other than grass, a broadleaf herb; a weed)
(Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is the practice of extracting natural gas from underground shale deposits by injecting high-pressure streams of water, sand, and chemicals)
(Latin: rein, bridle, a bit (as in a horses mouth); by extension, a medical term for a connecting fold of membrane in the body)
(Latin: producing energy; primarily by burning)
(Latin: helmet, helmet shaped, to cover with a helmet; cap; used primarily in zoology and botany with phases of sense development that seem to have been: weasel, weasel's skin or hide, leather, and then a helmet made of leather; by extension, it also means "cat, cats" in some words)
(Greek: genein, "to produce"; all the genetic information possessed by any organism)
(drawings on the ground by arranging stones, gravel, or earth)
(Greek: tongue; by extension, "speech, language")
(Greek: carve, carving, engraving; to hollow out; by extension, a form of writing)
(a personal presentation by a pair of hands)
(salmonella can be transferred to humans by pets)
(Greek: youth, pubescence, puberty [the period during which the secondary characteristics of maturity begin to develop; by extension, a young man])
(Greek: spiral, coil; twisted, bent; spiral-shaped; a coil; by extension, "snail")
(Greek: Hermes, the son of Zeus and Maia, the god of commerce and messenger of the gods in Greek mythology; identified by the Romans as Mercury; however, some of the words in this unit come from Hermes tris megistos, Hermes Trismegistus, literally, "Hermes, Thrice the Greatest" referring to the Egyptian god Thoth, who was identified with the Greek god Hermes, of science and arts)
(hoodwink, deceive, cheat; believed to be from hocus pocus which is probably from a pseudo Latin phrase: hax pax max Deus adimax, that was used by traveling conjurers to impress their audiences)
(Tricho Sales Corporation treated excess hair growth with a "ray of light")
(Latin: a suffix that forms English adjectives from Latin adjectives ending with -is or -ius with meanings about "pertaining to, relating to", or "characterized by")
(Greek: a suffix; pertaining to; of the nature of, like; in chemistry, it denotes a higher valence of the element than is expressed by -ous)
(Latin: from -icalis, a suffix that forms adjectives from nouns; of or having to do with; having the nature of; constituting or being; containing or made up of; made by or caused by; like, characteristic of; art or system of thought; chemical terms)
(Greek: fluid [distinct from blood] that flows through the veins of the gods; by extension, "watery part of blood or milk," used in the sense of "thin, serous or sanious fluid, especially from a wound or sore")
(Creativity is achieved by focusing and striving with one's chosen objective regardless of what others say or have done! In essence, it is a conception and the completion of the chosen vision.)
(Latin: internal secretion, especially by the endocrine glands or a gland)
(Greek > Latin: a suffix that is used to form hundreds of words that mean: similar to, resembling, like, characterized by, or of the nature of)
(Greek: equal; by extension: same, similar, alike; normally used as a prefix)
(Latin: a suffix; tending to, characterized by)
(Greek: a suffix; inflammation, burning sensation; by extension, disease associated with inflammation)
(Latin: beside; close by, close to, near; adjoining; proximity; to come together, to meet)
(a slip of the tongue, a mistake in uttering a word, an imprudent word inadvertently spoken; as expressed by public personalities in this series of articles)
(Latin: insect in its grub stage; from Latin larva, "mask" and by extension, "ghost", the idea being that an insect in its grub stage is merely a ghost of its future self and bears no resemblance to its future form)
(Latin: wash, washing; bathe, bathing; by extension, clean, cleaning)
(Latin: literally tongue; and by extension, speech, language)
(automakers need lithium for the next generation of cars running on batteries charged by electricity)
(Deep-sea animals have made attempts to light their cold and dark environments by carrying their own lights on their heads and on every other conceivable part of the bodies; including their eyes and tails and the insides of their mouths. The light they shed is living light.)
(Greek: ridge; crest, tuft; by extension, hill top)
(Latin: loin; by extension, the lower back)
(Greek: water, yellowish fluid; connected with, or containing, lymph, a transparent fluid that is derived from body tissue and conveyed to the bloodstream by the lymphatic vessels)
(Ludicrous-English Caused by Blunders and Incompetence)
(it was originally thought that this disease was caused by foul air or "bad air")
(Greek: sparse, thin, rare; slack, loose; by extension, "gas, vapor")
(Latin: mantellum, cloak, veil; by way of Middle English, from Old English mentel and from Old French mantel; resulting in English words about: mantle, mantel, and manteau)
(Greek: winding; from a winding river; by extension, curving, walking around slowly, drifting, wandering, roaming, going around aimlessly)
(Greek: apple; by extension, "cheek")
(Preface to a Dictionary of the English Language by Samuel Johnson)
(precursor of hypnotism, believed by Mesmer to involve animal magnetism)
(magnetic therapies doubted by other "scientists")
(Greek mikso > Latin mixtus: mix, mixed, a mixing, a mingling, an intercourse; to combine or to blend into one mass or substance; to combine things; such as, activities, ideas, styles; to balance and to adjust individual musical performers’ parts to make an overall sound by electronic means)
(Latin > French: done in exchange; reciprocal; with the same feelings or relationships; shared by two people or groups, in common with each other)
(Greek: mucus; a protective secretion from the mucous membranes in the nose, throat, and lungs; a thick fluid produced by the linings of some tissues of the body and is secreted as a protective lubricant coating by cells and glands of the mucous membranes)
(names that describe Venery or group names as determined by traditional terms of the hunt and those of more modern creations that attempt to describe group characteristics)
(An American Dictionary of the English Language as conceived by Noah Webster)
(Greek: a meadow; a pasture; an abode; a place for eating; by extension, "distribution of an acute, necrotizing ulcerative process involving mucous membranes of the mouth or genitalia")
(Latin: fat, adipose tissue; and by extension, caul, intestines)
(Greek: sell, for sale; by extension, buy, purchase, pay for, invest money into)
(Latin: rut or track made in the ground by a wheel; circle, ring, round surface, disk)
(Greek: oyster; creatures having or characterized by a type of hard shell)
(Latin: full of or having the qualities of; in chemistry, a suffix denoting that the element indicated by the name bearing it, has a valence lower than that denoted by the termination -ic; as, nitrous, sulphurous, etc., as contrasted with nitric, sulphuric, etc.)
(Greek: a "peak", but used by ecologists in the restricted sense of "foothill")
(Greek: by the side of, beside, past, beyond; contrary, wrong, irregular, abnormal)
(Greek: pemphix, "blister"; blistering skin diseases or a swelling of the skin that contains watery fluid and is caused by burning or irritation; a bump or small swelling on or beneath the skin)
(Latin: feather, feathers; by extension in some situations, wing, wings)
(Latin: through, across, over; beyond, by means of)
(Greek: eat, eating; to consume, to ingest; relationship to eating or consumption by ingestion or engulfing)
(Latin: flat cake; cakelike mass, especially the uterine organ that connects the mother to the child by way of the umbilical cord)
(Latin: a literary thief; "plunderer, oppressor, kidnapper" [one who "abducts the child or slave of another"]; then by extension, to take and use the thoughts, writings, etc. of someone else and represent or claim them as one's own)
(Latin: sole of the foot; to tread down with the sole or the flat bottom or the underside of the foot; and by extension, to level the ground for sowing seeds)
(avoid redundancies or excessive repetitiousness by not using unnecessary repetitions and superfluous words or more word usages than is needed, desired, or required)
(Greek: near; resembling that which is named by the combining root)
(Greek: wash, a washing; washtub, basin; by extension, irrigate, irrigation)
(a poem by Lorrie Cline)
(a poem about self control and character development by Rudyard Kipling)
(taking responsibility for one’s destiny by William Ernest Henley)
(said to be one of the greatest poems written during World War I by Alan Seeger)
(confronting death by William Cullen Bryant)
(an abnormal way of getting warm in the freezing conditions of a Canadian winter as expressed by Robert Service)
(thinking that you can be successful in achieving an objective is a vital mental condition, but thinking that you can not do it is almost a guarantee that you will not be successful as indicated by Walter Wintle)
(a famous poem by Edgar Allan Poe)
(coined and presented by Royston M. Roberts, PhD, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Texas, Austin; among many other achievements)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
("A Look at Publishing", remarks made by Godfrey Harris)
(Latin: viscous matter; yellowish matter produced by an infection)
(Greek: fire, burn, burning, heat, produced by heating, hot; and sometimes also referring to "fever as shown at this link")
(fluid of life from ancestors, parents, and transfusions; something that survives by circulating)
(situation in which less and less is done by more and more officials; government agency where after all is said and done, more is said than done)
(a stomach surrounded by curiosity; little creatures that are happier than their parents because they don’t have children of their own)
(something written by people who were not there at the time; the art of reconciling fact with fiction or making guesses about things that can not be verified.)
(a form of word humor when people fiddle with words and laugh at the resultant loony tunes: Considered by some to be the lowest form of humus, earthy wit that we all dig and often respond to with groans and moans)
(a form of word humor when people fiddle with words and laugh at the resultant loony tunes; considered by some to be the lowest form of humus, earthy wit, that we all dig and often respond to with groans and moans)
(a passage repeated or reproduced from a statement by someone; sometimes correctly)
(being alone either by choice or by circumstances)
(a process by which nature prevents everything from happening all at once)
(residential areas that have been connected to each other during rush hours by long traffic jams)
(a four-letter and a five-letter word that are avoided by many people)
(some say that RFID readers can be blocked by aluminum foil)
(Latin: branch, branches, or a forked structure; ramus (singular), rami (plural); a general term for a smaller structure given off by a larger one, or into which the larger structure; such as, a blood vessel or nerve, divides)
(Latin: tearing away, seizing, swift, rapid; snatch away, seize, carry off; from Latin rapere, "to seize by force and to carry off")
(The Roads That Led to Rome by Victor W. Von Hagen)
(The Roads That Led to Rome by Victor W. Von Hagen)
(a Czech word, robota meaning "serf" or "slave" or "forced work" which is now applied to any manufactured device that is capable of doing work ordinarily done by human beings)
(chapter listings with subdivision links for easier reading of Those about to Die book by Daniel P. Mannix)
(Latin: healthy, whole; by extension: cure, heal, take care of; sound in mind and body)
(Latin: to climb; to mount; by extension, a ladder)
(Latin: pertaining to, or having scurvy [a disease resulting from a deficiency of vitamin C in the body, characterized by weakness, anemia, spongy gums, bleeding from the mucous membranes, etc.])
(Latin: shield; a broad piece of metal or another suitable material, held by straps or a handle attached on one side, used as a protection against blows or missiles.)
(Latin: aside, apart from, without, by itself, by one's self)
(Latin: tallow, suet, fat, fatty; grease; by extension, "pertaining to a suetlike secretion of the body")
(Latin: feeling, perception through physical awareness; to discern or detect by touch, smell, taste, sight, hearing, etc.)
(Arabic: the gift of finding interesting things by chance; the faculty of finding valuable or agreeable things not sought for; an apparent talent for making fortunate discoveries accidentally)
(Latin: a hiccup; a sob, a speech broken by sobs)
(Latin: companion, partner, ally, comrade; interpersonal relationships, living with others, allied, associated; characterized by friendliness or geniality)
(Delivered by Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863)
(as seen in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, 1599, we have this famous speech)
(Greek: ball, round, around; globe, global; body of globular form; by extension, circular zone, circular area)
(Latin: thorn, prickle; by extension, "backbone", the spinal cord)
(Greek: covering, covered, to cover; roof; by extension, secret, secret writing, applied to a secret code, codes, or ciphers that are hidden)
("The Emperor's New Clothes" by Hans Christian Andersen is a fable about the pitfalls of political self-aggrandizement and the fear of people to face reality even when they know that the reality of the situation is untrue)
(Greek: with, together with; also by extension: united; same, similar; at the same time)
(Greek: arrangement, order, put in order, orientation; the movements or directed responses of motile organisms to stimuli, as indicated by the combining roots)
(Latin: rashly; at random, by chance; blindly; reckless; foolishly)
(Latin: sanctuary, consecrated place; an open place marked out by the augur for the observation of the sky)
(Latin: a witness, one who stands by; from testicle, one of the two oval male gonads supported in the scrotum by its tissues and suspended by the spermatic cord)
(Greek: tension, especially a convulsive tension; muscle spasm or tetanus, an infectious disease characterized by muscle spasms)
(Greek > Latin: inner room, bedchamber; so called by Galen because chambers at the base of the brain were thought to supply animal spirits to the optic nerves; thalamus, the middle part of the diencephalon (the area in the center of the brain just above the brain stem that includes the thalamus and hypothalamus) which relays sensory impulses to the cerebral cortex of the brain)
(Latin: to ring, to jingle; formed by reduplication (for the sake of emphasis) from the base of Latin tinnire, which is of imitative origin.)
(Latin: tickle, tickling; by extension, light scratching)
(once considered in poor taste; the joke was not nearly as vulgar as those that are currently expressed on many U.S. TV shows)
(also known as trichinellosis, it is caused by eating raw or undercooked pork and wild game products)
(Greek: chance, fortune, fate, providence; by accident, an unforeseen or unexpected occurrence)
(Greek: to smoke; smoke, mist, vapor, hot vapor, steam, cloud, fog; stupor [insensibility, numbness, dullness]; used exclusively in medicine as a reference to fever accompanied by stupor or a clouding of the mind resulting from the fever caused by a severe-infectious disease)
(Latin: love, loveliness, beauty, attractiveness, charm; by extension, "reverence; to worship")
(Latin: to beat, to strike; to drive, to force back; from verber, whip, lash, rod; by extension, to make sounds or noises or those sounds and echoes that are thrown back again or repeatedly)
(Latin: neighborhood, neighbor, near by, close; surrounding district)
(numbers of global visitors as indicated by the flags and initials of the countries from which the visitors have come)
(Latin: wound, wounding, woundable; from vulnus, "wound"; by extension: hurt; injure, injury; tear, gash; damage)
(Greek: foreign, foreigner; alien; different; extraneous; strange, stranger; and by extension, guest)
(Greek: yoke, forming pairs; joined, union; or indicating a relationship to a junction; meaning a yoke or crossbar by which two draft animals; such as, oxen could be hitched to a plow or wagon)
Word Entries containing the term: “by
"Book Borrower" by Robert Service (1874-1958)

I am a mild man, you'll agree,

But red my rage is,

When folks who borrow books from me

Turn down their pages.


Or when a chap a book I lend,

And find he's loaned it

Without permission to a friend

As if he owned it.


But worst of all I hate those crooks

(May hell-fires burn them!)

Who beg the loan of cherished books

And don't return them.


My books are tendrils of myself

No shears can sever . . .

May he who rapes one from its shelf

Be damned forever.

This entry is located in the following unit: Poem: Book Borrower (page 1)
"Book Loaner" by Dick Emmons

The book I lent a year ago

Is now of some concern;

I fear it's reached a new plateau—

The point of no return.

This entry is located in the following unit: Poem: Book Borrower (page 1)
Biomimetics: Designs by Nature, Imitated and Developed by and for Mankind

Utilizing nature in the present and in the future with engineering designs with biomimetics or biomimesis; that is, mimicking nature with technology.

Don't confuse this field of science with a similar term known as biometrics.

cauterization by points, punctuate cauterization (s) (noun); cauterizations by points, punctuate cauterizations (pl)
A surgical technique in which a fine probe bearing a hot agent that is used to heat deep, small areas.
This entry is located in the following units: caust-, caus-, caut-, cauter-, cau- + (page 2) pung-, punc-, punct- (page 2)
Chickens, which are raised for eggs and meat, are the most popular animals that are eaten by people before they become little babies (as eggs) and after they are older and butchered for food.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
English and its Historical Development, Warrior Queen Boudicca Rebellion Described by Tacitus
Tacitus describes rebellion of Boudicca, A.D. 60-61.
feces in the news, human feces used by many farmers in the world

Irrigation is the primary agricultural use of human waste in the developing world; however, frequently untreated human feces harvested from latrines is delivered to farms and spread as fertilizer.

Facing water shortages and escalating fertilizer costs, farmers in developing countries are using raw sewage to irrigate and fertilize nearly forty-nine million acres (20 million hectares) of cropland.

—From "Human Waste Used by 200 Million Farmers"
by Tasha Eichenseher in Stockholm, Sweden;
for National Geographic News; Published, August 21, 2008.
This entry is located in the following unit: feco-, fec-, faeco-, faec-, feci- + (page 2)
fumimania, fumimaniac; fumiphobia, fumiphobiac: created by John G. Robertson
The terms, capnomania, fumimania are all coined terms that mean "obsessive or uncontrollable desires or habits of smoking one or more tobacco products" (especially cigarettes; but they may include cigars, pipes, etc.) all of which also can be defined as "tobacco addictions".

They were coined by John G. Robertson in 2002 for his book: An Excess of Phobias and Manias, published in 2003, because they were unavailable in any dictionaries or other known sources to express these conditions.

The terms capno- comes from Greek and fumi- comes from Latin; both of which refer to various kinds of "smoke" or "fumes".

See the pages at this Capnomania-Fumimania, Part 1 for the poem, "The Ballad of Salvation Bill" and other pages about the problems of smoking from the past to the present.

You may see similar words (capnomania, capnomaniac, capnophobia, capnophobiac) which were also created by John Robertson at this capno- unit of words.

Global Positioning System (GPS): Pygmy elephants tracked by GPS
Using satellite tracking (GPS) of five pygmy elephants in Borneo with the objective that these and their fellow species can survive man's expansion into their natural habitat.
This entry is located in the following unit: Global Positioning System (GPS): Index of Articles (page 1)
Liquor: the procedure used by a male animal to clean his mate.
manually by hand
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 13)
Poem: Book Borrower by Robert Service
An expression of fury about people who borrow books and either mistreat them or fail to return them.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: I have a Rendezvous with Death by Alan Seeger
Another World War I poem that expresses the expectancy of the poet that he will be meeting death by the time Spring comes again.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: I Met the Master Face to Face by Lorrie Cline
Going from a worldly life to a spiritual awakening with a vision of meeting God.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: If by Rudyard Kipling
If is a well-known poem that challenges us to use "self control" and "character development" if we want to be mature.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: Invictus by William Ernest Henley
Invictus is a poem that urges us to be responsible for our own destiny in life.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: Thanatopsis by William Cullen Bryant
A poet who is expressing his thoughts about death which is the fate of every human being.
Poem: The Blind Men and the Elephant by John Godfrey Saxe
A popular poem about the differences of perceptions regarding an elephant as expressed by six blind men.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: The Cremation of Sam McGee by Robert Service
A poem that describes how Sam McGee finally found physical relief from his painful frigid condition.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: The Man Who Thinks He Can by Walter D. Wintle
A description of positive thinking and what it can do to help a person achieve his/her objective.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe
A classical poem about a raven which keeps uttering the words: "Nevermore".
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost
A famous poem which is often quoted is Robert Frost's "The Road not Taken" which indicates that we must make choices in life even if the decision is not what we anticipated.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: Trees by Joyce Kilmer
Presenting a special fondness for trees as gifts from God.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Poem: Words by Robert Service
Expressing a special fondness for words even as a castaway on an island.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poems: Index (page 1)
Polygamy is marriage to many spouses, while monotony is considered by some as marriage to just one spouse.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 5)
Vaseball: a game of catch played by children in the living room.
Wife-beating is "sanctioned" by Koran according to a German judge

A German judge has stirred a storm of protest in Frankfurt, Germany, by citing the Koran in turning down a German Muslim wife's request for a fast-track divorce on the ground that her husband beat her.

In a remarkable ruling that underlines the tension between Muslim customs and European laws, the judge, Christa Datz-Winter, said the couple came from a Moroccan cultural environment in which it is common for husbands to beat their wives. The Koran, she wrote, sanctions such physical abuse.

News of the ruling brought swift and sharp condemnation from politicians, legal experts, and Muslim leaders in Germany; many of whom said they were confounded that a German judge would put seventh-century Islamic religious teaching ahead of German law in deciding a case of domestic violence.

While legal experts said the ruling was a judicial misstep rather than evidence of a broader trend, it comes at a time of rising tensions in Germany and elsewhere in Europe, as authorities in many fields struggle to reconcile Western values with their burgeoning Muslim minorities.

Last fall, a Berlin opera house canceled performances of a modified Mozart opera because of security fears stirred by an added scene that depicted the severed head of the Prophet Muhammad.

Stung by charges that it had surrendered its artistic freedom, it staged the opera three months later without incident.

To some people here, the ruling reflects a similar compromising of basic values in the name of cultural sensitivity.

Muslim leaders agreed that Muslims living here must be judged by the German legal code, but they were just as offended by what they characterized as the judge's misinterpretation of a much-debated passage in the Koran governing relations between husbands and wives.

For some people, the greatest damage done by this episode is to other Muslim women suffering from domestic abuse. Many already fear going to court against their spouses.

There have been a series of so-called "honor killings" here in which Turkish Muslim men have murdered women.

—Compiled from excerpts of an article,
"German judge rouses anger by citing Koran: She claims it sanctions wife-beating";
by Mark Landler; International Herald Tribune; March 23, 2007; pages 1 & 4.
This entry is located in the following unit: sanct-, sancti- (page 3)
(the science of bodily structures and parts as discovered and developed over the centuries by means of dissections)
(more information about Dr. Harold Rocke Robertson donated by his son, Ian Robertson)
(judicial or legal words that may apply to trial processes that determine the guilt or innocence of people which is ascertained by either judges or juries)
(languages spoken by over 400 closely related groups in central, east-central, and southern Africa, belonging to the South Central subgroup of the Niger-Congo language family and including Swahili, Kinyarwanda, Kirundi, Zulu, Xhosa, etc.)
(enhance your English vocabulary by taking advantage of word origins)
(characterized by speed and efficiency, or carried out promptly and efficiently)
(the first newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
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(the fifth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the sixth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the seventh newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the eighth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(the ninth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
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(the fourteenth newsletter of a series that was formerly presented to subscribers by the Sr. Scribe, a.k.a. John Robertson)
(fields are protected by barriers of hedges by keeping the wind from eroding (blowing away) valuable top soil)
(Latin origins of words in English characterized by "jumping, leaping", or "springing forward")
(mathematics is the deductive study of quantities, magnitudes, and shapes as determined by the use of numbers and symbols while every branch of science and engineering depends on mathematics; measurement is the process of associating numbers with physical quantities and phenomena and measurement is fundamental to the sciences; to engineering, construction, and other technical fields; and to almost all everyday activities)
(how some terms might be interpreted by those who lack professional vocabulary knowledge in the field of medicine)
(A few clips from Old Age Is Not for Sissies by Art Linkletter)
(based on words from The Washington Post's "Style Invitational" in which readers were given the opportunity to take any word from the dictionary, alter it by adding, subtracting, or changing one letter, and then to provide a new definition for the modified word)
(words to live by, to inspire, and to give guidance)
(some of the common terms and abbreviations used by those who send out text messages)
(theater as we know it was originated by the Greeks and many of their theatrical terms are still in use)
(increase your vocabulary skills by practicing with these word challenges)
(as presented by Mickey Bach, the cartoonist who defined words with related illustrations)
(a suffix freely used to designate someone who is associated with, concerned with, or characterized by a thing or an expression; sometimes, with a jocular [humorous] or derisive [contempt or ridicule] intent; borrowed from Russian, a common personal suffix)
(there are many words which may be rarely seen by a vast number of people; however, they have been existing and they are still available for one's use or enlightenment)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “by
“Lawyer Idiocy” as Demonstrated by Some of Them

On November 8, 1998, there was an article in “Dear Ann Landers” titled, “Lawyer-bashing: Sometimes wounds are self-inflicted.”

The Massachusetts Bar Association Lawyers Journal printed the following questions actually asked of witnesses by lawyers during a trial. The responses to some of the questions were given by insightful witnesses. This is not a put-on. It’s for real. —Ronita in Center Line, Michigan”

  • Question: Now, doctor, isn’t it true that when a person dies in his sleep, he doesn’t know about it until the next morning?
  • Question: The youngest son, the twenty-year-old, how old is he?
  • Question: Were you present when your picture was taken?
  • Question: Was it you or your younger brother who was killed in the war?
  • Question: Did he kill you?
  • Question: How far apart were the vehicles at the time of the collision?
  • Question: You were there until the time you left, is that true?
  • Question: She had three children, right?

    Answer: Yes.

    Question: How many were boys?

    Answer: None.

    Question: How many were girls?

  • Question: You say the stairs went down to the basement?

    Answer: Yes.

    Question: And these stairs, did they go up, also?

  • Question: How was your first marriage terminated?

    Answer: By death.

    Question: And by whose death was it terminated?

  • Question: Can you describe the individual?

    Answer: He was about medium height and had a beard.

    Question: Was this a male or a female?

  • Question: Is your appearance here this morning pursuant to a deposition notice that I sent to your attorney?

    Answer: No, this is how I dress when I go to work.

  • Question: Doctor, how many autopsies have you performed on dead people?

    Answer: All my autopsies are performed on dead people.

  • Question: All your responses must be oral. OK? What school did you go to?

    Answer: Oral.

  • Question: Do you recall the time that you examined the body?

    Answer: The autopsy started around 8:30 p.m.

    Question: And Mr. Dennington was dead at the time?

    Answer: No, he was sitting on the table wondering why I was doing an autopsy.

  • Question: Mr. Slatery, you went on a rather elaborate honeymoon, didn't you?

    Answer: I went to Europe, sir.

    Question: And you took your new wife?

  • Question: So the date of conception was August 8th?>

    Answer: Yes.

    Question: And what were you doing at the time?

  • Question: Are you qualified to give a urine sample?

    Answer: I have been since early childhood.

  • Question: You were not shot in the fracas?

    Answer: No, I was shot midway between the fracas and the navel.


Oh, well! That's the way it goes sometimes.


This entry is located in the following unit: Focusing on Words Newsletter #05 (page 1)
A Scriptural Riddle by Lucy King (dates of birth and death are unknown)
God made Adam out of dust,
But thought it best to make me first.
So I was made before the man,
To answer God's most holy plan.

This body He did make complete,
But without legs or arms or feet;
My ways and actions He did not control,
But I was born without a soul.

A living being I became;
'Twas Adam gave me my name;
When from his presence I withdrew,
I no more of Adam ever knew.

I did my Maker's laws obey;
From them I never went astray.
Thousands of miles I roamed in fear,
And seldom on the earth appear.

But God did something in me see,
And put a living soul in me,
A soul of me my God did claim,
And took from me that soul again.

And when from me that soul had fled,
I was the same as when first made;
And without hands, or feet, or soul,
I travel now from pole to pole.

I labor hard both day and night;
To fallen men I give great light;
Thousands of people, young and old,
May by my death great light behold.

To heaven I shall never go,
Nor to the grave, nor Hell below,
Now as these lines my friend you read,
Just search the Scriptures with great heed,
And if my name you do not find,
It's very strange; I guess you're blind.

More than a century ago, there resided in Beverly, Massachusetts, an elderly lady by the name of Lucy King, who was a student of the Scriptures. In the neighboring town of Taunton lived a merchant who had a reputation for successfully answering the most perplexing riddles.

One day, he offered a prize to Miss King if she could compose a riddle which he could not answer, the subject being taken from the Bible. She created the riddle shown above and won the prize.


—The solution to this riddle can be found by
going to the Bible and reading Genesis 1:21.
This entry is located in the following unit: Poetry, Proverbs, Quotes, and Statements of Faith (page 1)
Afghan girl tricked by insurgents dies in blast
tricked:
insurgents: Those who belong to a group of people fighting to take control of their country by force.
blast: An explosion, especially one caused by a bomb.
remote:
detonated the bomb remotely:

"Insurgents tricked an 8-year-old girl in a remote area of central Afghanistan into carrying a bomb wrapped in a cloth and then detonated the bomb remotely when she was close to a policed vehicle. Only the girl was killed in the blast."

International Herald Tribune, June 26, 2011; page 5.
Bionics, Illustrated by a Bionic Hand
A bionic hand which is considered a next-generation prosthetic device which appeals to both patients and health care professionals unit.
By the skin of your teeth (Job 19:20)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 1)
By the sweat of your brow (Genesis 3:19)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 1)
Fall by the wayside (Matthew 13:4)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 2)
He who lives by the sword, dies by the sword (Matthew 26:52)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 3)
One Sweetly Solemn Thought by Phoebe Cary (1852-1871)
One sweetly solemn thought

Comes to me o’er and o’er;

Nearer to my home today am I

Than e’er I’ve been before.


Nearer my Father’s house,

Where many mansions be;

Nearer today, the great white throne,

Nearer the crystal sea.


Nearer the bound of life

Where burdens are laid down;

Nearer to leave the heavy cross,

Nearer to gain the crown.


But lying darkly between,

Winding down through the night,

Is the deep and unknown stream

To be crossed ere we reach the light.


Father, perfect my trust!

Strengthen my power of faith!

Nor let me stand, at last, alone

Upon the shore of death.


Be Thee near when my feet

Are slipping over the brink;

For it may be I’m nearer home,

Nearer now than I think.

This entry is located in the following unit: Poetry, Proverbs, Quotes, and Statements of Faith (page 1)
The Better Way by Edgar A. Guest (1881-1959)
I'd rather see a sermon

Than hear one any day;

I'd rather one should walk with me

Than merely show the way.


The eye's a better pupil,

And more willing than the ear;

Fine counsel is confusing,

But example's always clear.


The best of all the preachers

Are the men who live their creeds,

For to see good put in action,

Is what everybody needs.


I can soon learn how you do it,

If you let me see it done;

I can watch your hands in action,

But your tongue too fast may run.


And the lectures you deliver

May be very wise and true;

But I'd rather get my lesson,

By observing what you do,


For I may misunderstand you,

And the high advice you give,

But there's no misunderstanding

How you act and how you live.

This entry is located in the following unit: Poetry, Proverbs, Quotes, and Statements of Faith (page 1)
Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill (Part 1)
1. "One of the most common causes of failure is the habit of quitting when one is overtaken by temporary defeat."
2. How does anyone learn the art of converting defeat into stepping stones to opportunity?
3. All achievements have their beginnings in ideas because thoughts are things!
  • Ideas can be powerful things when they are mixed with a definite purpose, persistence, and a burning desire for their translations into definite objectives.
  • One sound idea is all that a person needs to achieve success.
  • Achievements begin with a state of mind and with a definite purpose.
  • Success comes to those who become success conscious. Failure comes to those who indifferently allow themselves to become failure conscious.
  • One of the principles of success is desire: knowing what one wants.
  • Whatever the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve.

  • DESIRE is the starting point of ALL achievement!
  • Choosing a definite goal places all the energy, all the will power, all the effort, everything, back to that goal.
  • Desiring success with a state of mind that becomes an obsession, then planning definite ways and means to acquire success, and backing those plans with persistence which does not recognize failure, will bring success.
  • There is one quality which a person must possess to win, and that is definiteness of purpose, the knowledge of what one wants, and a burning desire to possess it.
    1. If the thing you wish to do is right, and you believe in it, go ahead and do it! Put your dream across, and never mind what "they" say if you meet with temporary defeat, for "they", perhaps, do not know that every failure brings with it the seed of an equivalent success.

  • A burning desire to be and to do is the starting point from which the dreamer must take off.
  • Dreams are not born of indifference, laziness, or lack of ambition.
  • Remember that all who succeed in life get off to a bad start, and pass through many heartbreaking struggles before they "arrive".
  • No one is ready for any thing until that person believes that it can be acquired. The state of mind must be belief, not mere hope or wish.

—Excerpts compiled from
Think and Grow Rich: by Napoleon Hill; Fawcett Publications, Inc.;
Greenwich, Connecticut; 1961; pages 19-47.
This entry is located in the following unit: More Mental Control and Development?
Yes, you can!
(page 1)
Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill (Part 2)
1. There are no limitations to the mind except those we acknowledge.
2. Both poverty and riches are the offspring of thought.

Faith is the visualization of, and belief in attainment of desire

Faith is the head chemist of the mind and when faith is blended with thought, the subconscious mind instantly picks up the vibration, translates it into its spiritual equivalent, and transmits it to Infinite Intelligence, as in the case of prayer.

  • Faith is a state of mind which may be induced, or created, by affirmation or repeated instructions to the subconscious mind, through the principle of autosuggestion.
  • Repetition of affirmation of orders to your subconscious mind is the only known method of voluntary development of the emotion of faith.
  • Your belief, or faith, is the element which determines the action of your subconscious mind.
  • It is essential that people encourage the positive emotions as dominating forces of their minds, and to discourage and to eliminate negative emotions.
  • It is a well-known fact that people come, finally, to believe whatever they repeat to them selves, whether the statements are true or false. People are what they are because of the dominating thoughts which they permit to occupy their minds.
  • Thoughts which are mixed with any of the feelings of emotions constitute a "magnetic" force which attracts other similar or related thoughts.
  • The law of autosuggestion, through which anyone may rise to altitudes of achievement which stagger the imagination, is well described in the following composition:

    If you think you are beaten, you are,
    If you think you dare not, you don't.
    If you like to win, but you think you can't,
    It is almost certain you won't.

    If you think you'll lose, you're lost
    For out of the world we find,
    Success begins with a person's will;
    It's all in the state of mind.

    If you think you are outclassed, you are,
    You've got to think high to rise,
    You've got to be sure of yourself before
    You can ever win a prize.

    Life's battles don't always go
    To the strongest or fastest woman or man,
    But sooner or later, those who win
    Are those WHO THINK THEY CAN!
—Excerpts compiled from
Think and Grow Rich: by Napoleon Hill; Fawcett Publications, Inc.;
Greenwich, Connecticut; 1961; pages 48-73.
This entry is located in the following unit: More Mental Control and Development?
Yes, you can!
(page 1)