You searched for: “ab
(Latin: prefix; from, away, away from)
(Latin: prefix; indicating electromagnetic units of the centimeter-gram-second system)
Word Entries containing the term: “ab
Ab absurdo (Latin phrase)
1. From being ridiculous, irrational, incongruous, or illogical: When people argue ab absurdo, they are trying to establish the validity of their positions by pointing out the ridiculousness or foolishness of their opponents' arguments.

Although an argument ab absurdo "demolishes" an opponent's position in debate, it does not necessarily prove the validity of that person’s position. The only thing that may be accomplished is that the ab absurdo argument may make the other person seem to be foolish or illogical.

2. Etymology: Latin "from the absurd" or "from nonsense".
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 2) surd-, -surd (page 1)
Ab abusu ad usum non valet consequentia. (Latin term)
Translation: "The consequences of abuse do not apply to general use."

Used by legal specialists and suggests that a right should not be withheld from people because of others who abuse it.

Ab actu ad posse valet illatio. (Latin term)
Translation: "Inference from what has happened to what will happen is valid."

The social worker was urged to consider ab actu ad posse valet illatio when assessing a case of potential child abuse.

Ab aeterno (Latin phrase)
Translation: "Since the beginning of time."

The audience was reminded that ab aeterno the hawks have nested on the cliffs near the lake.

Literally, "from eternity" or "of no date of origin".

Ab agendo (Latin phrase)
1. Translation: "Out of action."

The long distance runner was deemed ab agendo because of her broken leg.

2. Obsolete or retired: The farmer's old tractor was considered ab agendo and so it could only be sold as an antique.
Ab alio expectes, alteri quod feceris. (Latin term)
Translation: "Expect from others what you have done to them."

Prout multis ut faciant vobis homines, et vos facite illis similiter; "As you would that men should do to you, do you also to them in like manner." From Luke 6:31 of the Latin Vulgate, a Latin version of the Bible produced by Saint Jerome in the 4th century.

From Latin vulgata editio, "an edition made public" or "an edition for ordinary people" which is a version used by the Roman Catholic Church.

Ab ante (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From before or in advance."

Making up one’s mind ab ante.

Eric went to the train station ab ante of the train arriving at noon.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 2)
Ab antiquo (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From ancient times or from olden times."

Ab antiquo is useful for those who are always looking back to the good old days.

Dale enjoyed listening to the stories his grandmother told him ab antiquo.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 2)
Ab asino lanam (Latin phrase)
Literal translation: "Wool from an ass [donkey]."

The more modern meaning of ab asino lanam is "trying to get blood from a stone or a turnip" or "anyone who tries to achieve the impossible is bound to fail."

Trying to get Gretchen to change her mind about going to France was an exercise in ab asino lanam.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 2)
ab extra; ab ex. (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the outside; from without."

The infection pervading in the hospital appears to have originated ab extra or ab ex..

Ab extrinseco (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the outside."

The information reported to the police appeared to be from ab extrinseco sources.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 3)
Ab hoc et ab hac et ab illa. (Latin term)
Translation: "From this man, this woman, and that woman."

Also translated as, "From here, there, and everywhere."

The talk of gossips; as, such and such a person did or said this or that, is also known as ab hoc et ab hac et ab illa.

A statement which characterizes something heard or said in general gossip with no indication of its precise source is called an ab hoc et ab hac et ab illa.

Fritz was not prepared to rely on ab hoc et ab hac et ab illa information because he wanted to check out the data and make sure it was accurate.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 3)
Ab igne ignem. (Latin term)
Translation: "From fire, fire."

Also translated as, "As you sow, so shall you reap."

This suggests that anyone should expect to get only what he or she puts into a project or effort.

The visiting minister, who was very outspoken, exhorted the congregation, ab igne ignem.

Ab imo pectore (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the bottom of the breast or chest."

The equivalent of "speaking from the heart" or "sincerely". It sounds peculiar until you realize that to the Romans the breast (pectus) was the source both of reason and of the emotions. So to speak ab imo pectore means the same thing as to "speak from the bottom of one's heart".

When describing her love for James, Pam declared that she was speaking ab imo pectore.

Ab inconvenienti (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the inconvenience."

A discomfort, difficulty, or annoyance.

Used in law to state that a position is untenable because of the hardship or inconvenience it would create.

Marjory's lawyer appealed the sentence from the court, stating that it was ab inconvenienti because she needed to care for her children and her aged mother.

Ab incunabulis (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From infancy."

This phrase may be translated as "cradle, swaddling clothes, infancy, or origin". Although ab incunabulis doesn't include a special reference to books, it still often refers to the earliest stage or beginning of something; but most often books date back to the period before 1500 A.D., when the use of movable type in printing was in its beginning stage.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 3)
Ab initio; ab inti (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the beginning."

The Latin equivalent of "from the start" or "from inception".

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 3)
Ab integro (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the new."

Starting over again; a fresh start.

This entry is located in the following units: integ- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 3)
Ab intestato (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From or by a person dying intestate", i.e., without a valid will.

A reference to someone who has died and left no will or testament.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 3) testi-, test- (page 1)
Ab intra (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From within (oneself)."

The role of an insider is played out ab intra or "from within" an organization.

This entry is located in the following units: intra- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 3)
Ab irato (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From an angry man."

Any action taken ab irato is to be understood as arising from anger rather than reason, and responses to such actions should be weighed carefully by reasonable people.

Ab officio et beneficio (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From official (duties) and benefits."

A suspension from a job and the remunerations or pay which come with it.

Ab origine (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the first; from the origin."

This phrase may also be translated as "From the very beginning" or "From the source"; "From the start of something": There is no evidence that humans came from the ab origine of the world.

Ab origine fidelis. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Faithful from the first."
Ab ovo (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the egg; from the very beginning."

A search ab ovo is a thorough analysis and a complete presentation.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 4) ovo- (page 1)
Ab ovo usque ad mala (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the egg to the apples."

A Roman phrase similar to English, "From soup to nuts"; but it means "From start to finish". This meaning is based on the fact that Roman dinners often started with eggs and ended with fruit.

From the beginning to the end of any enterprise; thoroughly, or without qualification.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 4) ovo- (page 1)
Ab uno ad omnes (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From one to all."
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 4)
Ab uno disce omnes. (Latin term)
Translation: "From one, learn all."

"From one sample, judge or know all the rest." From Virgil's Aeneid. This maxim, or rule, applies to situations in which the acceptance of a single observation is universally applicable. Such a careless application is considered a trap for faulty generalizations; like et sic de similibus, "and so of similar (people or things)"; "and that goes for the others, too."

Ab urbe condita; A.U.C. (Latin term)
Translation: "A.U.C., from (since) the founding of the city (Rome)", about 753 B.C.

The Romans used this date as the starting point for calculating an era. Ab urbe condita is also presented as Anno urbis conditae, "In the year of the founding of the city" which is also abbreviated A.U.C..

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 4)
anno urbis conditae; A.U.C., Ab urbe condita
From the founding of the city [Rome].

The traditional date for the founding of Rome is 753 B.C.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 16)
argumentum ab auctoritate
A proof derived from an autority.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18)
argumentum ab inconvenienti
An appeal based on the hardship or inconvenience involved.
Cave ab homine unius libri.
Beware the man of [with] one book.

Be careful of the person who owns just one book.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 2) libr-, libel + (page 1)
Mors ab alto.
Death from [a] height or from above.
This entry is located in the following units: alto-, alt-, alti- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group M (page 4)
Nascentes morimur finisque ab origine pendet. (Latin proverb)
Translation: "From the moment of birth, we begin to die and the end hangs from the beginning."

An alternate meaning: "Every day, starting from birth, we die a little."

toasted skin syndrome, erythema ab igne
1. A blotchy or mottled discoloration of the skin that develops from prolonged or repeated exposure to heat without a burn.
2. A syndrome (combination of symptoms) which consists of a brownish discoloration of the skin caused by the prolonged exposure to heat from a laptop computer.

The condition can lead to permanent darkening of the skin, and in some cases, it may lead to damage that results in skin cancers.

The heat that causes the condition originates from a laptop computer’s optical drive, the battery, or the ventilation fan; or any combination of these elements.

People who spend prolonged periods of time studying, reading, or playing games on laptop computers placed on their upper legs can develop toasted skin syndrome and the affected area may be itchy and lesions may occur.

The condition, technically called erythema ab igne, has been observed before on the lower legs of patients who worked in front of open fires or coal stoves.

Erythema ab igne is a reticulated, pigmented, macular eruption that occurs, mostly on the shins, of bakers, stokers, and others who are exposed to radiant heat.

The condition can also result from heating pads and hot water bottles, car heaters, fireplaces, stoves or other heat sources.

Workers; such as, bakers or chefs who encountered heat on the job have been at risk of getting toasted skin syndrome; and now, the increased use of a laptop on the lap has become another cause of this condition.

Vix distat summus ab imo.
The loftiest is scarcely removed from the lowest.
This entry is located in the following unit: vix-, vixi- (page 1)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “ab
a-, ab-, abs-
Latin: prefix; from, away, away from; in this unit.
ab init., ab initio
From the beginning.
This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 1)