You searched for: “cavity
cavity
1. A hollow space or concavity in an organ, part, or structure; often designating only a potential space; cavitas.
2. A hollow place or space or a potential space, within the body or in one of its organs; it may be normal or pathological.
3. A natural hollow or sinus within the body.
3. A soft decayed area in a tooth; progressive decay can lead to the death of a tooth.
4. A sizeable hole (usually in the ground).
This entry is located in the following unit: cav-, cavo-, cava-, cavi-, cavern- (page 3)
More possibly related word entries
Units related to: “cavity
(Greek > Latin > Old French: passageway, used primarily as "a pore, a small orifice"; opening; cavity, tract)
(Greek: pipe, tube, cavity, fistula; spine)
(Latin: trough, channel; small cavity, small pit; hollow)
(Greek: cave, cavern; in medicine, of or pertaining to a [bodily] cavity or sinus; a term in anatomical nomenclature, especially to designate a cavity or chamber within a bone)
(Greek: shell; husk; cup [of a flower], used primarily in the specialized senses of "pertaining to or of a cup-shaped bodily organ or cavity"; also a reference to the "cup-shaped ring of sepals encasing a flower bud")
(Greek: hollow; abdomen; hernia; used primarily in the sense of concave; pertaining to a bodily cavity)
(Greek > Latin: shell, sea shells; shell-like bone or cavity of the body)
(Greek: ring; used in the extended sense of pertaining to the [ring-shaped] cartilage that forms the back and lower part of the laryngeal cavity)
(Greek > Latin: swelling, a knot; center of a cavity; nerve center; pertaining to a mass of nerve tissue)
(Latin: wall [of a house], walls; used in the extended sense of "the walls of a cavity or organ of the body")
(Greek: side, rib; a thin membrane with two layers that line the chest cavity)
(Greek: door, gate, entrance; orifice, an aperture or hole opening into a bodily cavity; indicating the portal vein)
(Greek: entrails, intestines, viscera [internal organs collectively; especially, those in the abdominal cavity])
(Latin: [little] belly; hence, "a small cavity; especially of the heart or brain")
Word Entries containing the term: “cavity
abdominal cavity (ab DAHM uh nuhl KAHV i tee) (s) (noun), abdominal cavities (pl)
1. The space between the stomach area and the spine which contains a number of crucial organs: The abdominal cavity includes the lower part of the esophagus, the stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, spleen, kidneys, adrenal glands, ureters, bladder; as well as, associated tissues and blood and lymphatic vessels all of which are surrounded by the flat band of fibrous tissue below the skin that covers the underlying tissues and separates the different layers of tissue.
2. Etymology: from Latin abdomen, abdominis, "belly" and from medical Latin abdominalis.

The stomach (which is in the abdominal area) is lined with thirty-five million glands that produce about three quarts (2.85 liters) of gastric juices daily. Hydrochloric acid makes up roughly five percent of these juices and, together with other acids and various enzymes, constantly works to digest food particles.

—Compiled from The Body Almanac by Neil McAleer;
Doubleday & Company, Inc.; Garden City, New York; 1985; page 186.
abdominopelvic cavity
1. The large hollow space between the diaphragm and the groin.

There is no structurally distinct separation between the abdomen and pelvic regions.

2. The largest hollow space of the body, between the diaphragm and the top of the pelvic cavity and surrounded by the spine and the abdominal muscles and others.

It contains most of the alimentary canal, the liver and pancreas, the spleen, the kidneys, and the adrenal glands. It is lined by the peritoneum, a membrane covering the cavity's inside wall (parietal peritoneum) and each organ or structure in it (visceral peritoneum).

This entry is located in the following unit: abdomin-, abdomino-, abdomen- (page 4)
axillary cavity (s) (noun), axillary cavities (pl)
The hollow spaces under the arms of people where they are joined to the shoulder: When Tim was studying basic anatomy in his high school, he learned that axillary cavities are medical terms for the armpits.

This entry is located in the following unit: axillo-, axill-, axil- (page 1)
body cavity (s) (noun), body cavities (pl)
There are two major body cavities: the dorsal cavity and the ventral cavity, which are spaces within the body that contain and protect internal organs.

These two cavities are defined in their alphabetical positions in this unit.

This entry is located in the following unit: Medical Terms and Their Essential Word Parts (page 1)
buccal cavity (s) (noun), buccal cavities (pl)
The area between the inside of the cheek, the teeth, and the gums.
This entry is located in the following unit: bucco-, bucc-, bucca-, bucci- (page 1)
cranial cavity (KRAY nee uhl KAHV i tee) (s) (noun), cranial cavities (pl)
1. Located within the skull where it surrounds and protects the brain.
2. Etymology: cranial comes from Modern Latin cranium which came from Greek kranion, "skull"; while cavity is from Middle French cavité (13th century), from Late Latin cavitas, "hollowness" which came from Latin cavus, "hollow".
This entry is located in the following unit: Medical Terms and Their Essential Word Parts (page 1)
dorsal cavity (s) (noun), dorsal cavities (pl)
Located along the back of the body and head.

It contains organs of the nervous system that coordinate body functions and is divided into two parts: the cranial cavity and the spinal cavity; both of which are defined in this unit.

Meckel cavity
Trigeminal cave, the cleft in the meningeal layer of dura of the middle cranial fossa near the tip of the petrous part of the temporal bone; it encloses the roots of the trigeminal nerve and the trigeminal ganglion.
This entry is located in the following unit: Meckel, Johann Friedrich (page 1)
pelvic cavity (PEL vik KAHV i tee) (s) (noun), pelvic cavities (pl)
1. Part of the ventral cavity that is formed by the hip bones and which primarily contains the organs of the reproductive and excretory systems.
2. Etymology: pelvic refers to the "basin-like cavity formed by the bones of the pelvic girdle" from Modern Latin which came from Latin pelvis, "basin, laver" (borrowing of Latin lavare, "to wash").
This entry is located in the following unit: Medical Terms and Their Essential Word Parts (page 1)
solar cavity receiver
A well-insulated enclosure with a small opening to let in concentrated solar energy, approaching a blackbody absorber in its ability to capture solar energy.

Black body or blackbody is a theoretical object that is simultaneously a perfect absorber and emitter of radiant energy; that is, it absorbs all the radiation striking it and reflects no radiation, and whose energy distribution is dependent only on its temperature.

This entry is located in the following unit: sol-, soli-, solo- + (page 2)
spinal cavity (SPIGH nuhl KAHV i tee) (s) (noun), spinal cavities (pl)
1. A cavity located within the spinal column and that surrounds and protects the spinal cord.
2. Etymology: from Late Latin spinalis, which came from Latin spina, "back bone" and cavity is from Middle French cavité (13th century), from Late Latin cavitas, "hollowness" which came from Latin cavus, "hollow".
This entry is located in the following unit: Medical Terms and Their Essential Word Parts (page 2)
ventral cavity (s) (noun), ventral cavities (pl)
Located along the front of the body; it includes, the thoracic cavity, the abdominal cavity, and the pelvic cavity.

All of these terms are defined separately in their alphabetical positions in this unit.

This entry is located in the following unit: Medical Terms and Their Essential Word Parts (page 2)