You searched for: “archaeology
archaeology, archeology (s) (noun); archaeologies, archeologies (pl)
The scientific study and reconstruction of the human past through the systematic recovery of the physical remains of man's life and cultures.

Artifacts, structures, settlements, materials, and features of prehistoric or ancient peoples are surveyed and/or excavated to uncover history in times before written records.

Archaeology also supplements the study of recorded history. From the end of the 18th century onwards, archaeology has come to mean the branch of learning which studies the material remains of mankind's past. Its scope is, therefore, enormous, ranging from the first stone tools made and fashioned by man over three million years ago in Africa, to the garbage thrown into our trash cans and taken to city dumps and incinerators yesterday.

The objectives of archaeology are to construct cultural history by ordering and describing the events of the past, study cultural processes to explain the meaning of those events and what underlies and conditions human behavior, and reconstruct past lifeways.

Among the specialties in the field are: archaeobiology, archaeobotany, archaeozoology, and social archaeology. Modern archaeology, which is often considered a subdiscipline of anthropology, has become increasingly scientific and relies on a wide variety of experts; such as, biologists, geologists, physicists, sociologists, anthropologists, and historians.

The methods appropriate to different periods vary, leading to specialized branches of the subject, e.g. classical, medieval, industrial, etc. archaeology.

—Compilation of information gleaned from the
Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc.; William Benton, Publisher: Chicago;
1968, Vol. I, Pages 224-281.
Word Entries containing the term: “archaeology
classical archaeology, classical archeology
A field within historical archaeology specializing in the study of Old World Greek and Roman civilizations, their antecedents, and their contemporaries.
industrial archaeology (noun) (not countable)
1. The study of machines, methods, buildings, and locations which are characteristic of the early history of the Industrial Revolution or used by various industries in the past.
2. The archaeological study of the period and sites of the Industrial Revolution and later.

It involves the discovery, recording, and study of the material remains of past industrial activities, covering ways of making, transporting, and distributing products.

pseudo-archaeology, pseudoarchaeology; pseudoarcheology
The use of selective archeological evidence, real or imagined, to promulgate nonscientific, fictional accounts of the past.
public archaeology, public archeology
A branch of archeeology dealing with the impact of construction and development on archaeological sites and laws enacted to lessen the threat.

In the U.S., it has helped to create the industries of salvage archaeology or cultural resource management (in the U.K., it is called "rescue archaeology").

quantitative archaeology, quantitative archeology
Archaeological techniques dependent on counting, measuring, and the use of statistical methods and computers.
rescue archaeology, rescue archeology
The branch of archaeology devoted to studying artifacts and features on sites which are imminently threatened by development in the form of the construction of dams, buildings, highways, etc.

Threats to archaeological remains occur in the form of road-building, road improvement, new building of houses, offices, and industrial complexes, the flooding of valleys for reservoirs, and improved farming techniques involving the use of deep plowing.

The rescue, or salvage, archaeologist, is concerned with the retrieval of as much information as possible about the archaeological sites before they are damaged or destroyed. Frequently time is too short and funds are too limited for anything but a brief survey.

salvage archaeology, salvage archeology (s) (noun) (no plural)
A branch of ancient times that are devoted to studying artifacts and features on sites which are in danger of being damaged, or destroyed, by development in the form of the construction of dams, buildings, highways, etc.: "Salvage archaeology includes the location, recording (usually through excavation), and collection of archaeological data from a site in advance of highway construction, drainage projects, or urban development."

In the U.S., the first major program of salvage archaeology was undertaken during 1930, ahead of the construction and dam building done by the Tennessee Valley authority."

The rescue, or salvage, archaeologist, is concerned with the retrieval of as much information as possible about the archaeological sites before they are damaged or destroyed.

Word Entries at Get Words: “archaeology
archaeology
The study of the cultural life of prehistoric or extinct groups of people.
Archaeology, Archeology
Scientific research into earth's history via archeology.
This entry is located in the following unit: Index of Scientific and Technological Topics (page 1)
More possibly related word entries
A unit at Get Words related to: “archaeology
(a glossary of archeological terms particularly related to the field of research that can tell us about our origins and our remote past)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “archaeology
experimental archeology, or archaeology
The replication of ancient technologies in order to better understand ancient production processes and the use of specific artifacts.
This entry is located in the following unit: Archeology, Archaeology (page 3)