You searched for: “ante
ante-, ante, anti-; auntie, aunty
ante- (AN tee) (noun )
A prefix meaning "before": The novel was set in the antebellum South.
ante (AN tee) (verb)
1. In poker, to put up a stake before the cards are dealt, or before drawing new cards: The dealer waited until everyone had a chance to ante up before he dealt the cards.
2. Often used figuratively to mean to put up money, to cover costs: Parents are usually expected to ante up, or to pay, for their children's college education.
3. To increase an amount or level; such as, to raise the cost or price of something: The popular actress first demanded twice the salary offered to her but then she kept upping the ante.
4. To increase the risk or possible harm that could result from something: The new law ups the ante, or increases penalties, for people who cheat on their taxes.
anti- (AN tigh, AN tee) (noun).
A prefix meaning against or contrary: Miguel is definitely antiwar because there had to be better ways to settle international disputes.

Exceptions: antipasto (Italian, where anti-, means "before" + pasto "food") and anticipate.

auntie, aunty (AN tee, AUN tee) (nouns)
An informal way of saying "aunt": Tamara, Sonia's favorite auntie, was coming to visit that night.

Tanya's favorite auntie was always interested in the life styles and customs of the antebellum Southern states; however, she was also known to be very anti-oppressive of the poor and oppressed.

So, Tanya's aunt used her influence to ante up the commitment of the community to create a food bank.

(Latin: before, in front of, prior to, forward; used as a prefix)
Word Entries containing the term: “ante
Ab ante (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From before or in advance."

Making up one’s mind ab ante.

Eric went to the train station ab ante of the train arriving at noon.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 2)
ante bellum, antebellum
Before the war.

Specifically, in the United States, before the "Civil War" or before "The War between the States".

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 16)
ante Christum natum; A.Ch.N.
Before Christ's birth.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 16)
ante Christum; A.C.
Before Christ.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 16)
ante cibos (plural of ante cibum)
Before meals and is usually abbreviated as a.c. in prescriptions, etc.
This entry is located in the following units: cibo-, -cibal (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 17)
ante cibum (s), ante cibos (pl)
Before a meal; usually, abbreviated a.c. in medical prescriptions, etc.
ante cibum; a.c.
Before food.

A direction on prescriptions indicating that medicine should be taken before meals.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 17)
ante diem, a.d.
Before the day.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 17)
ante meridian
This entry is located in the following units: ante-, ant- (page 2) medio-, medi- (page 1)
ante meridiem
This entry is located in the following unit: ante-, ant- (page 2)
ante meridiem; a.m.
Before noon.

Before the middle of the day or before noon (meridiem).

Used to designate the hours between midnight and noon (one second after 2400 hours and one second before 1200 hours?).

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 17)
ante mortem
Before death.

Made or done just before one’s death.

ante omnia
Before all things.

First of all.

This entry is located in the following unit: omni-, omn- (page 1)
ante res
Before things.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 17)
Ante victoriam ne canas triumphum.
Do not sing your triumph before the victory.

In other words, "Don't start bragging before the contest is over."

antemundane, ante-mundane (adjective); more antemundane, more ante-mundane; most antemundane, most ante-mundane
Pertaining to being or taking place before the creation of the world.
This entry is located in the following units: ante-, ant- (page 4) mundan-, mund-, mond- (page 1)
ante-patriarchal
Existing before the patriarchs.
This entry is located in the following unit: pater-, patri-, patro-, patr-, -patria (page 1)
margaritas ante porcos
Pearls before swine.

[Don't throw] pearls before swine. Based on the verse found in the Bible; Matthew 7:6 in which it is written: "Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you" [tear you into pieces].

A caution against offering the uncultured anything of quality; or, a caution against presenting anything to those who have no appreciation for the value of the product that has been created.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group M (page 1) margarito- (page 1)
Quoniam mille anni ante oculos tuos, tanquam dies hesterna, quae praeteriit, et custodio in nocte.
A thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night.

From the Old Testament, Psalms 90:4.

status quo ante
The previous position.

Commonly used in international dealings to indicate that nothing is to be changed, or that there is to be a return to an earlier state of affairs.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group S (page 7)
status quo ante bellum
The previous position before the war.

Commonly used in international dealings to indicate that there is to be a return to an earlier state of affairs that existed before a war.

This entry is located in the following units: belli-, bell- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group S (page 8)
Ubi sunt qui ante nos fuerunt? Ubi sunt?
Where are those who lived before us?

Ubi sunt motif is a poetic theme emphasizing the transience of youth, beauty, or life itself. The most famous ubi sunt lament is that of Francois Villon (15th c.) for the beautiful ladies now dead and gone begins with "But where are the snows of yesteryear?" The question may concern persons, places, or abstractions; it may open a poem or be used as a refrain.

A motif; from Medieval Latin motivus, "moving", is a unifying theme threaded through a work of art. In Thomas Wolfe's novels, the father-quest, not for his earthly father but for a power on which he could rely, is a dominant motif.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group U (page 1) ubi- (page 2)
Ubi sunt ui ante nos fuerunt.
Where are those who lived before us? (Title of a medieval lyric).
This entry is located in the following unit: ubi- (page 2)
Ultima semper expectanda dies homini, dicique beatus ante obitum nemo supremaque funera debet.
Man's last day must ever be awaited, and none to be counted happy until his death, until his last funeral rites are paid.
This entry is located in the following units: beat- (page 1) funer-, funero-, fun- (page 2) super-, supra-, sur- (page 17) ultim- + (page 1)