You searched for: “animals
animal (AN uh muhl) (s) (noun), animals (pl)
1. An organism of the kingdom Animalia, distinguished from plants by certain characteristics: Animals have the power of locomotion, fixed structure, and limited growth.

An animal is a creature that is distinguished from plants by having independent movements and responsive sense organs.

2. Any member of the kingdom "Animalia", comprising of multicellular organisms that have a well-defined shape and usually limited growth, can move voluntarily, actively acquire food and digest it internally, and have sensory and nervous systems that allow them to respond rapidly to stimuli: Some animals are restricted to being quadrupeds and applied; especially, to such as those that are used by man, as a horse, a donkey, or a dog.
3. Etymology: from Latin animale, "living being, a being which breathes."

An older definition from the 1755 Dictionary of the English Language

Animals are such beings, which, besides the power of growing, and producing their kind, as plants and vegetables have, are endowed also with sensation and spontaneous motion.

—Dr. Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language, 1st ed., 1755
This entry is located in the following units: -al; -ial, -eal (page 8) anima-, anim- (page 1)
Animals: A Variety of Lions
A pictionary of lions. from African countries.
This entry is located in the following unit: Animal Index (page 1)
Animals: Elephant Shrews
A shrewd configuration of elephant shrews with seven amazing illustrations of these unusual animals.
This entry is located in the following unit: Animal Index (page 1)
Animals: Lion Wants Privacy
The lion does not want anyone or anything to intrude into his territory.
This entry is located in the following unit: Animal Index (page 1)
Animals: Pet Food
The content of pet food.
This entry is located in the following unit: Animal Index (page 1)
More possibly related word entries
Units related to: “animals
(a dog with a special talent for human words)
(this is a pictionary of lions from African countries)
(sleeping bears and their physical conditions)
(having a "bird brain" may be a good thing, after all)
(shrewd configurations of the elephant shrew)
(Leo the lion does not want anyone or anything to intrude into his territory)
(here's what pets are really eating)
(fauna [animals] and flora [plants] at the bottom of the sea)
(Diana, or Luna, Roman goddess of the Moon, animals, and hunting)
(Latin: bat, bats (animals))
(animals from different perspectives)
(Cloned animals currently known)
(interactions between people and animals)
(Latin: animal; a collective name for the animals of a certain region or time)
(electronic chips are being placed under the skins of people and animals)
(Deep-sea animals have made attempts to light their cold and dark environments by carrying their own lights on their heads and on every other conceivable part of the bodies; including their eyes and tails and the insides of their mouths. The light they shed is living light.)
(Latin: "paint"; coloring matter involving both animals and plants)
(Greek > Latin: dried up, withered, mummy; the bony and some of the cartilaginous framework of the body of animals; including humans)
(Latin: a vessel or vessels; including, tubes, ducts, or canals that convey and circulate fluids; such as, blood, lymph, or sap, through the bodies of animals or plants)
(terms of Venery or group names from traditional terms of the hunt and some more modern creations that attempt to describe group characteristics of animals, humans, and groupings)
(the scientific study of animals)
(Greek: diseases communicated from one kind of animal to another or to human beings; usually restricted to diseases transmitted naturally to man from animals)
(Greek: diseases communicated from one kind of animal to another or to human beings; usually restricted to diseases transmitted naturally to man from animals)
(origin and background of the study of animals in motion)
(Greek: yoke, forming pairs; joined, union; or indicating a relationship to a junction; meaning a yoke or crossbar by which two draft animals; such as, oxen could be hitched to a plow or wagon)
Word Entries containing the term: “animals
aquatic animal (s) (noun), aquatic animals (pl)
A creature that lives in water: Aquatic animals require a watery habitat, but they do not necessarily have to exist entirely in such a liquid environment or situation.

Wildlife habitats are classified as either aquatic (water), terrestrial (land), or amphibious (water and land).

Chickens, which are raised for eggs and meat, are the most popular animals that are eaten by people before they become little babies (as eggs) and after they are older and butchered for food.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 2)
Fields, Forests, Wild Animals, Flocks, and Shepherds: Pan, Faunus
Greek: Pan (god)
Latin: Faunus (god)

The god of nature. Symbols: goats and satyrs.

This entry is located in the following unit: gods and goddesses from Greek and Latin Myths (page 1)
Knowledge: Animals Index
Here is your opportunity to appreciate our fellow creatures from the very small to the very large.
This entry is located in the following units: Knowledge: General Index (page 1) learn, learning; know, knowledge (page 1)
Moon, Wild Animals, Youth, and Hunting: Artemis, Diana
Greek: Artemis (goddess); earlier, goddess of the moon: Selene
Latin: Diana (goddess); earlier, goddess of the moon: Luna

The goddess of the moon and hunting, patroness of maidens. Symbols: the crescent, stag, and arrows.

This entry is located in the following unit: gods and goddesses from Greek and Latin Myths (page 2)
Smithsonian Animals

A Visual Encyclopedia; Project editors, Carrie Love, Caroline Stamps; Dorling Kindersley Limited; New York; 2012. Printed and bound in China by South China Printing Co. Ltd.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 2)
Tongues and Animals

Information about tongue functions with animals

They're skinny, thick, colored, sometimes sticky, occasionally nubbed flabs of flesh that dangle in the mouths of virtually every mammal, bird, reptile, fish and amphibian on earth.

Tongues, as we know these universal appendages, can zap prey, slurp water, groom a friendly shoulder, shovel food, taste, twist, and enable their owners to make precise sounds.

The tongue presents a great anatomical puzzle. It is essentially solid muscle, but muscle by itself is usually useless.

A muscle, that can perform work only by contracting, becomes useful when attached to something rigid like bone.

When the muscle shortens, it pulls bones this way or that, providing the owner all sorts of mobility. For example, chameleons have a bone at the base of their tongues. Squeezing muscles against it makes the long tongue squirt out with extra force.

A tongue's muscles mingle at all sorts of angles, butting into each other head-on, stringing through a central core, curling around the outside like vines.

For a given motion, one muscle group tenses and another one pulls the tensed group as if it were one. In a split second, groups trade roles so the tongue can flick the opposite way.

—Compiled from excerpts located in
"What a Mouthful!"; International Wildlife, March-April, 1995; pages 45-48.
This entry is located in the following unit: Tongue: How it Works (page 1)
zoological animals (zoo animals) (pl) (noun)
1. Animals that are housed in facilities where they are kept for exhibition: At Maurice's local zoo, visitors can see giraffes and countless other zoological animals each day.
2. A collection of wild animals kept in close, or open confinement, usually for public viewing: The “Wildpark" in Ted's city is a place where zoological animals like wolves, bisons, lynx, and otters can be seen, not in cages, but in natural habitats.
This entry is located in the following units: anima-, anim- (page 5) Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 25)
A unit at Get Words related to: “animals
(A visual presentation of various plants, animals, insects and other forms of life in their environments)
(phyla rhymes or major taxonomic groups, classifying of living organisms, into which animals are divided and made up of several classes in poetic format)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “animals
Ocean animals
A fish and a turtle are examples of two ocean creatures.

Two animals are swimming in an ocean environment.

This entry is located in the following unit: Views of Nature (page 1)