You searched for: “anatomy
anatomy (s) (noun), anatomies (pl)
1. The profession in science dealing with morphology which is concerned with the gross and microscopic structure of animals, especially humans.
2. The study of form, or the branch of science that studies the physical structure of animals, plants, and other organisms.
3. The physical structure; especially, the internal structure, of an animal, plant, or other organism, or of any of its parts.

Gross anatomy involves structures that can be seen with the naked eye. It is the opposite of "microscopic anatomy" (or histology) which involves structures seen under the microscope.

Traditionally, both gross and microscopic anatomy have been studied in the first year of medical school in the U.S. The most celebrated textbook of anatomy in the English-speaking world is Gray's Anatomy, still a useful reference book.

The word anatomy comes from the Greek ana-, "up" or "through" + tome, "a cutting". Anatomy was once a "cutting up" because the structure of the body was originally learned through dissecting it; that is, cutting it up.

A unit related to: “anatomy
(Latin: hip [anatomy], hip-bone, hip joint)
(Greek: within, inside, inner; used as a prefix [used in many words related to anatomy and biology])
(Latin: window; in anatomy, a small opening in a bone; to bring to light, to show)
Word Entries at Get Words: “anatomy
anatomy
The study of the physical structure of organisms, including the human body.
anatomy
The study of the internal structure of an animal.
This entry is located in the following unit: Zoology (page 1)
anatomy
1. The study, classification, and description of structures and organs of the body by observation or examination of a living being, examination or dissection of dead specimens, microscopic examination, and/or by the use of text books.
2. The science of the structural organization of any organism, whether plant or animal.
3. The macroscopic structural organization of a part or body, usually determined by means of dissection.

The term anatomy is almost a direct borrowing of the Greek anatome, because the Greeks were among the first known to systematically dissect the human body.

The Greek word is a compound of ana-, "up" + tome, "a cutting"; therefore, the earlier anatomy was a "cutting up" and "dissection" remains even to this day the essential method of learning about the structure of the body.

The study of the human body was not very reliable during the so-called Dark Ages until Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), a Flemish anatomist, revived the study of anatomy with his publication of De Humani Corporis Fabrica, "The Structure of the Human Body", in 1543.

This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 2)
anatomy
The study of form.

Gross anatomy involves structures that can be seen with the naked eye and is the opposite of microscopic anatomy, or histology, which involves structures seen under the microscope.

Traditionally, both gross and microscopic anatomy are studied in the first year of medical school in the U.S. The most celebrated textbook of anatomy in the English-speaking world is >Gray's Anatomy, which is still a useful reference book.

The word "anatomy" comes from the Greek ana- meaning "up" or "through" + tome meaning "a cutting".

Anatomy was once a "cutting up" because the structure of the body was originally learned through dissecting it; that is, "cutting it up".

More possibly related word entries
A unit at Get Words related to: “anatomy
(the science of bodily structures and parts as discovered and developed over the centuries by means of dissections)
(the structure of organisms from the smallest components of cells to the biggest organs and their relationships to other organs especially of the human body)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “anatomy
Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms

Lists of anatomy and anatomical topics.

This entry is located in the following unit: Index or Menu of Various Topics (page 1)
applied anatomy
The practical application of anatomic knowledge to the diagnosis and treatment (including surgical techniques) in clinical situations.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 3)
artificial anatomy
The study of structures and their relationships by means of models or other manufactured articles.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 3)
artistic anatomy
The study of human anatomy by artists i order to improve their perceptions and skill in representing the human body.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 3)
Body Systems or Anatomy
Body Systems and terms.
This entry is located in the following unit: Index of Scientific and Technological Topics (page 1)
clastic anatomy
Artificial anatomy using models or drawing on superimposed plastic sheets in removable layers depicting successively deeper structures as seen in an encyclopedia, medical dictionary, etc.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 4)
comparative anatomy
The examination of the skeletons of dogs and humans and their similarities and differences.

The most significant differences being the upright posture adopted by humans, the absence of collarbones in dogs, the attachment of the humerus of the dog to the chest wall along its entire length, plus the fact that humans walk on their whole foot, whereas dogs walk only on the equivalent of the human toes.

This entry is located in the following unit: Dog or Canine Terms + (page 3)
comparative anatomy
The systematic comparison of bodily structures and their functions in living organisms.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 4)
descriptive anatomy
The description of the structure of tissues, organs, and parts as observed, either macroscopically or microscopically, without necessarily referring to their functions.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 4)
developmental anatomy
1. The branch of embryology concerned primarily with the development of structure, tissues, and organs, rather than with; for example, biochemical, genetic, or the experimental aspects.
2. Embryology of an organism from the time of egg fertilization until adulthood is attained.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 4)
general anatomy
The combined gross and microscopic anatomy of the organs, tissues, and fluids of the body.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 4)
gross anatomy, macroscopic anatomy
The study of the structural organization of the different parts of an organism by means of dissection and with the unaided eye.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 4)
medical anatomy
The application of anatomic knowledge to the location, diagnosis, and treatment of medical disorders.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 4)
muscular anatomy
The examination of the special structures of muscles, characterized by their power to contract when stimulated.

There are three types of muscles: striated or skeletal muscles, smooth or visceral muscles, and specialized cardiac muscles.

This entry is located in the following unit: Dog or Canine Terms + (page 7)
physiologic anatomy, functional anatomy
The study of the structure of organs and tissues in relation to their normal functions.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
plastic anatomy
Artificial anatomy utilizing manikins of plastic or other materials, parts of which may be removed to expose adjacent structures.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
practical anatomy
The study of anatomy by means of dissection and demonstration.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
radiological anatomy
The study of normal bodily parts and their interrelations by using radiological techniques.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
regional anatomy
The study of structures in distinct regions of the body, isolated for descriptive convenience or on a functional basis; such as, the head, the limbs, and the abdomen, or subdivisions of these including the shoulder region, the brachial region (arm, foreleg, etc.), the gluteal region (a reference to any of the three large muscles of each buttock; especially, the gluteus maximus, that extend, abduct, and rotate the thigh), etc.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
segmental anatomy
The anatomy of the lungs in terms of their broncho-pulmonary segments.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
special anatomy
The detailed anatomy of specific organs or groups of organs and tissues as they are related to each other by their particular functions.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
surface anatomy
The study of the form and markings of the surface of the body; especially, as they relate to underlying tissues and organs.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
surgical anatomy
The study of the anatomy of a region of the body with particular emphasis on concepts important to the diagnosis and treatment of a surgically correctable disease.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
systematic anatomy, systemic anatomy
The study of an organism's structures grouped into functional systems; such as, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, nervous, circulatory, etc.; without regard to specific regions.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
topographic anatomy
The study of an organism's structures in relation to their neighboring structures as revealed by dissection, light and electron microscopy, or other techniques.

As an example, in gross anatomy, the relationships of nerves, blood vessels,and lymph nodes to a particular muscle, ligament, etc.

This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
topographical anatomy
The examination of the outward appearances and identifications of the various regions of a dog's anatomy.
This entry is located in the following unit: Dog or Canine Terms + (page 10)
transcendental anatomy
The study of the anatomy of organisms in the light of deductions and theories concerning the possible variants derived from hypothetical ancestral forms.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 5)
veterinary anatomy
The branch of anatomy dealing with the form and structure of domesticated animals.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 6)
x-ray anatomy
The study of gross anatomy as demonstrated by radiological methods.
This entry is located in the following unit: Anatomy and Related Anatomical Terms (page 6)