You searched for: “ad
ad
Up to; so as to make; used in medicine.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 6)
ad
@, at, or to.

Used to express the cost of individual items.

This entry is located in the following unit: ad- (page 1)
ad (s) (noun), ads (pl
Short for advertisement: Mr. Black placed an ad in the paper to sell his car.
ad, add
ad (AD) (noun)
Short for advertisement: Jim's employer placed an ad in the paper for additional workers.
add (AD) (verb)
1. To find the sum of numbers or quantities: Shane and Clara tried to add the total number of people who were at the party.
2. To go on to say or to write more: Helen said goodbye and wanted to add that she had a pleasant visit with Darren and Yvonne.
3. To join one thing to another so as to increase the number, quantity, or the importance of something: Lynn decided to add a new wing to her house.

Francisco and Thelma placed an ad in the paper because they wanted to add a pool to their yard; however, after they decided to add all of the expenses, they found it much more feasible to invest in a wading pool instead.

(Latin: prefix; to, toward, a direction toward, addition to, near, at; and changes to: ac-, af-, ag-, al-, an-, ap-, aq-, ar-, as-, at- when ad- is combined with certain words that begin with the letters c, f, g, l, n, p, q, r, s, and t)
(Latin: a gland or the glands near the kidneys: ad-, "near" plus ren[es], "kidneys")
(Latin: ad-, "to, toward, near" plus gluten, glutinis, "glue, beeswax")
(a book that is bound to be used and where one word leads to another and another, ad infinitum)
(used to attract ad-clicking visitors, content must be created, begged, borrowed, or most commonly, simply stolen)
Word Entries containing the term: “ad
a capite ad calcem (Latin motto)
Translation: "From head to heel; thoroughly."

Equivalent to "from top to bottom".

A mari usque ad mare.
From the sea all the way to the sea.

The motto of the Dominion of Canada; also meaning, "From sea to sea."

In fact, for both Canada and the United States, the "seas" are really oceans. Although the Romans had the word oceanus, which they borrowed from the Greek okeanos; in Homer, it was considered to be a river that surrounded the earth.

The word mare was used more often to mean "ocean". Who could know the difference between oceans, seas, and rivers back in ancient Rome or even in Homer's time? In fact, there are many even in our current existence who can not explain the differences.

A maximis ad minima. (Latin)
Translation: "From the greatest to the least."
A primo ad ultimum. (Latin motto)
Translation: "From first to last."
A verbis ad verbera. (Latin proverb)
Translation: "From words to blow."

Also translated as, "One thing leads to another."

Ab abusu ad usum non valet consequentia. (Latin term)
Translation: "The consequences of abuse do not apply to general use."

Used by legal specialists and suggests that a right should not be withheld from people because of others who abuse it.

Ab actu ad posse valet illatio. (Latin term)
Translation: "Inference from what has happened to what will happen is valid."

The social worker was urged to consider ab actu ad posse valet illatio when assessing a case of potential child abuse.

Ab ovo usque ad mala (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From the egg to the apples."

A Roman phrase similar to English, "From soup to nuts"; but it means "From start to finish". This meaning is based on the fact that Roman dinners often started with eggs and ended with fruit.

From the beginning to the end of any enterprise; thoroughly, or without qualification.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 4) ovo- (page 1)
Ab uno ad omnes (Latin phrase)
Translation: "From one to all."
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 4)
Abiit ad majores.
He has gone to his forefathers.

He’s dead.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 4)
Abut ad plures.
1. He has gone to the majority.
2. He is dead.
ad-
This prefix, ad-, appears before vowels and before the consonants d, h, j, m, and v: et al.

Before sc, sp, and st; ad- is simplified to a-: ascend, aspect, et al.

Before c-, ad- is assimilated to ac-: accelerate, accept, accept, accident, accord, accumulate, accurate, accurate, et al.

Before f, ad- becomes af-: affable, affect, affidavit, affiliate, affinity, affirm, affix, afflatus, afflict, affluence, et al.

Before g, ad- becomes ag-: agglomeration, agglutinate, aggrandize, aggravate, aggravate, aggregate, aggression, aggressive, aggressive, aggressor, et al.

Before l, ad- becomes al-: allege, allegiance, alleviate, alliteration, allocate, allude, allure, allusion, alluvium, et al.

Before n, ad- becomes an-: annex, annihilate, annotate, announce, annul, annulment, et al.

Before p, ad- becomes ap-: apparatus, appeal, appearance, append, appendage, appendix, appetite, applaud, applause, applicable, application, applied, apply, appoint, apportion, apposition, appraise, appreciate, apprehend, apprentice, approach, appropriate, approve, approximate, et al.

Before q, ad- becomes ac-: acquaint, acquaintance, acquiesce, acquiescence, acquire, acquisition, acquital, et al.

Before r, ad- becomes ar-: arrears, arrest, arrive, arrogant, et al.

Before s, ad- becomes as-: ascent, ascertain, ascribe, aspect, , assail, assailant, assault, assemble, assent, assert, assertion, , asset, assiduous, assign, assignment, assist, assistant, associate, assonance, assortment, assuage, assume, assumption, assurance, assure, assuredly et al.

This entry is located in the following unit: ad- (page 1)
ad absurdum (adverb), more ad absurdum, most ad absurdum
A reference to an argument demonstrating the ridiculousness of an opponent's proposition: "To what is absurd; to the point absurdity or inconsistent with obvious truth, reason, or sound judgment."
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 6) surd-, -surd (page 1) -um (page 1)
ad annum
Up to the year.

Used to indicate a specific year date.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 6) -um (page 1)
Ad arbitrium. (Latin phrase)
Translation: "Anything done by one's own will."
This entry is located in the following unit: arbitr-, arbit- (page 1)
ad astra
To the stars.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 7)
Ad astra per aspera. (Latin motto)
Translation: "To the stars through difficulties" or "To the stars in spite of difficulties."

The motto of the state of Kansas, USA and Campbell University, Buies Creek, North Carolina, USA.

This motto suggests that we achieve great things only by encountering and overcoming adversities; it will be rough going, but we will make it.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) asper- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 7) per- (page 1)
Ad augusta per angust. (Latin motto)
Translation: "To honors through difficulties."

Augusta refers to holy places, angusta to narrow spaces; therefore, sometimes we can not achieve great results without suffering by squeezing through narrow spaces.

ad calendas graecas
At the Greek calends; that is, never; or when hell freezes over.

This statement refers to the calends, the first day of the month, that was a feature of the Roman calendar, but the Greeks had no calends.

The calends was the day that interest on borrowed money was to be paid, so for Roman debtors they were tristes calendae, "the unhappy calends".

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 7)
Ad captandam benevolentiam (Latin motto)
Translation: "To win good will."

For the purpose of winning good will.

ad captandum
To please.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 7)
ad captandum vulgus
To please the common people.

To please or to win the favor of the masses or the crowd.

The implication is that such actions may not be in the best interest of society, but are intended only to achieve popularity or political goals; such as, winning an elective office, publicizing movies, novels, sports, TV programs, or any promotion that wants the masses to be involved for their support.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 7) vulg- (page 1)
ad clerum
To the clergy.

A statement made by a church leader and intended only for the clergy as opposed to a statement ad populum, "to the people".

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 7)
ad eundem
To the same [degree].

Of equivalent value.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 7)
ad eundem gradum
To the same degree.

Sometimes abbreviated ad eundem, this phrase may be used to place blame or praise among parties to a deed. The fuller version has a special use when applied to academic life.

Considering gradum as an academic rank, under special circumstances a person holding a Master of Arts degree from one institution may be awarded the same degree by another institution without examination or even matriculation; such a degree being termed "M.A. ad eundem gradum".

ad eundem; ad eund.
Of equivalent value.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 7)
ad extra (Latin phrase)
Translation: "To the outer."

In an outward direction.

ad extremum (Latin phrase)
Translation: "To the extreme."
Ad finem fidelis. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Faithful to the end."
Ad finem spero. (Latin motto)
Translation: "I hope to the last."
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 2) fin- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 7)
Ad finem ultimum. (Latin motto)
Translation: "To the final end."

Said to be the motto of the Canadian Space Agency.

ad finem; ad fin. (adverb) (non comparable)
To the end: "The term ad finem; or its abbreviation, ad fin., is used at or near the end of a piece of writing."
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 2) fin- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad gloriam
To glory; for glory.

See ad maiorem dei gloriam for more information.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 2) glori-, glor- + (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad gustum
To one's taste.

May be found in a cookbook: "Add salt ad gustum."

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 2) gust-, gusti- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad hanc vocem; a.h.c. (Latin)
Translation: "At this word."
ad hoc (Latin phrase)
Translation: "Toward this; for this [specific purpose]."

The term ad hoc has several applications: for a special purpose, for a particular reason or occasion, or for the present matter or situation; all of which applies only to a specific case that should be resolved.

An ad hoc committee is one whose existence is limited to the time that is necessary to take care of an issue that is currently being considered; then, when the problem is solved, the committee will go out of existence.

Only for this case or purpose, special.
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This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad hominem (adjective) (not comparable)
1. Directed at a person's character, not to his or her logic or record; maliciously critical: In rhetoric, an ad hominem argument attacks the defenders of an opposing position personally rather than sticking to the point of the discussion.

The editorial in the paper was a very ad hominem piece, directing its attack towards the new mayor.

2. Appealing to personal prejudices or emotions rather than to reason: When debating, participants should avoid ad hominem arguments that question their opponents' motives.

The announcers were cautioned not to use ad hominem comments in their radio broadcast.

Attacking one's opponent rather than staying on the subject.
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ad horrorem
To the point of horror.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad hunc locum; ad.h.l.; a.h.l.
To this place.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad idem
To the same [point or effect].

In agreement; at a meeting of the minds: "She said, the parties were ad idem."

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad ignorantiam (Latin phrase)
Translation: "To ignorance": The complete phrase is argumentum ad ignorantiam. Used in law, it is an argument in a trial that may be based on ad ignorantiam; that is, on an opponent's ignorance of the facts in a legal case.

Also, a judicial decision may be appealed ad ignorantiam; that is, on the basis that the case was decided without knowledge of important information which was known but was unrevealed during the trial.

ad infinitum; ad inf.; ad infin. (ad in fuh NIGH tuhm) (adverb) (not comparable)
Without limit; indefinitely into the future; endlessly; describing something which goes on forever.

Jonathan Swift, an English satirist born in Ireland (1667-1745), wrote: "So, naturalists observe, a flea hath smaller fleas that on him prey; and these have smaller still to bite ‘em; and so proceed ad infinitum."

The term is often used interchangeably with ad nauseam and the original Latin sense is "beyond limits".

Without end or limit.
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This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) fin- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad initium; ad init.
At the beginning.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad instar
After the fashion of; like.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
ad interim; ad int., a.i. (adverb) (not comparable)
For the current time, temporarily, in the meantime: In the interim, Mark Jones will be appointed as chair of the board of directors.
Temporary or in the meantime.
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This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) inter-, intero- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 8)
Ad Kalendas Graecas or Ad Calendas Graecas
[It shall be done] on the Greek Calends, i.e. never!

In the Roman calendar, the Calends meant the first day of the month. Since the Greeks did not have this term, the expression was used by the Romans to designate an event that would never occur.

Discussed in Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars: Augustus, chapter 87, section 1; in which Ad Calendas Graecas was explained to mean that the next day after never. Since the Greeks used no Kalends in their reckoning of time, the phrase was used about anything that could never take place.

Another Latin proverb with the same meaning: Paulo post futurum or "A little after the future."

An old English proverb that is similar says, "When two Sundays meet (come together)."

There is a French equivalent: L'arrest fera donné es prochaines Calendes Grecques. C'est à dire: iamais. (from Rabelais, Gargantua) "The judgment shall be given out at the next Greek Calends, that is, never."

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9)
ad lib
A spontaneous remark that is invented and presented on the spur of the moment without previous thoughts about it.
This entry is located in the following unit: Dictionary with a Touch of Humor (page 1)
ad libitum; ad lib; (adverb)
At pleasure; according to one's pleasure; freely, unscripted, improvised; extemporaneously.

This is usually shortened to ad lib. [with or without a period]. Ad lib is used both as a verb and as a noun.

When used in the entertainment world, to ad lib means to improvise, to add an impromptu word or statement to a script. As a noun, an ad lib is an "off-the-cuff", or unprepared, remark.

It is said that there are some politicians who have "carefully planned ad libs".

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9)
ad limina apostolorum
To the thresholds of the Apostles; to the highest authority.

This applies to matters appropriate for papal consideration and disposition before the tombs of St. Peter and St. Paul. It is often abbreviated ad limina and is used in non-church situations to mean that a dispute must be settled by a higher authority.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9)
ad litem
For the suit or action.

Used in law as a decision that is taken as valid only for the action being adjudicated and is a reference, for instance, of a guardian appointed to represent someone incapable of acting for himself/herself during the court case.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9)
ad literam, ad litteram (adverb) (non comparable)
To the letter; precisely; exactly: "Jason instructed his secretary to retype the letter ad litteram or exactly as it is now."
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 3) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9) liter- (page 1)
ad locum; ad loc.
At the place or to the place.

At some place which is indicated.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9)
ad majorem dei gloriam; A.M.D.G.
To [or for] the greater glory of God.

Motto used by the Jesuit order (Society of Jesuits).

Sometimes the full expression is cited as the rationale for actions taken by Christians.

ad manum (Latin phrase)
Translation: "At hand."
ad modum
Toward the manner of.

After the manner of.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9)
ad multos annos
For many years.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9) multi-, mult- (page 1)
ad nauseam (adverb) (not comparable)
To a sickening, ridiculous, or disgusting degree: Usually a reference to something that goes on and on and on, ad nauseam (to seasickness) or for some people, endlessly or forever.

Ad nauseam suggests that certain actions, speeches, discussions, etc. have reached a point at which they are almost more than anyone can bear!

Henry bragged ad nauseam about the one home run he hit while playing baseball.

To the point of disgust or revulsion.
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To sicken or to disgust.
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This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) naus-, nau-, naut-, -naut, -nautical, -nautics + (page 1)
ad oculos
To the eyes.

Before one's eyes.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9) oculo-, ocul- + (page 1)
ad partes dolentes; ad part. dolent
To the painful or aching parts.
ad patres
To the [fore]fathers; to the dead.

To the ancestors or to the dead. To go ad patres is to die; to send someone ad patres is to kill that person.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9)
Ad perpetuam rei memoriam. (Latin statement)
Translation: "For the perpetual remembrance of the thing."

These words are traditionally used to open papal bulls.

ad populum
To the people.

Ad populum is intended for the ears of all the people, not just a limited or special few.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 9) popu- (page 1)
Ad praesens ova cras pullis sunt meliora.
Eggs today are better than chickens tomorrow.

Like the English proverb: "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush." It is considered more important to hold on to what one has than to risk everything in speculation.

ad quem
For which; to whom.

Opposite of a quo (from which).

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 10)
ad quod damnum
To what damage.

A legal phrase used for assessing damages relating to privately owned land that is taken for public use. The name of a writ formerly issuing from the English chancery, commanding the sheriff to make an inquiry "to what damage" a specified act, if done, will tend.

This writ is of ancient origin, and could be issued as a writ of right when a landowner was dissatisfied with the assessment of damages as a result of a condemnation commission.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) damn-, demn- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 10)
ad referendum (ahd reh feh REHN duum) (s) (noun); ad referenda (or) ad referendums
Translation: "For further consideration" which literally translates as "for referring" and is a diplomatic term: Diplomats who accept a proposal for their governments ad referendum indicate by their actions that final acceptance is dependent on the approval of the diplomats' governments.

The legal phrase ad referendum is also used for assessing damages relating to privately owned land that is taken for public use.

This writ of ad referendum is of ancient origin, and could have been issued as a writ of right when a landowner was dissatisfied with the assessment of damages to his property as a result of a condemnation commission.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 4) -fer, -ferous (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 10)
ad rem
To the thing.

Translated as, "to the matter at hand; to the point; relevant" can be presented in various ways. This phrase contrasts with ad hominem in that debaters who argue ad rem address the matter at hand to score points in the debate; debaters who argue ad hominem personally attack their opponents to score points.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 5) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 10)
ad saturandum, ad sat.
To saturation.
This entry is located in the following unit: ad- (page 5)
Ad summum.
To the highest.

Motto of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 5) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 10)
ad unguem
Perfectly.

Literally, "to a fingernail", this phrase is used to convey the thought of accomplishing something well or precisely.

In ancient times, a sculptor would test the smoothness of a finished surface by running a fingernail over it.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 5) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 10) ungu- + (page 1)
ad unum
Unanimously.

Literally, "all to one", where the meaning is "unanimously".

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 5) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 10)
ad usum externum, ad us. exter.
For external use.
This entry is located in the following unit: ad- (page 5)
ad usum; ad us.
According to usage.
This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 5) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 10) us-, ut- (page 1)
Ad utrumque paratus.
Ready for either [eventuality].

A mature person is ready to cope with any eventuality, including the final one; in other words: "Prepared for the worst." Compare with semper paratus.

This entry is located in the following units: ad- (page 5) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 10) para-, par- (page 1)
ad valorem; ad val., ad v., a/v; ad valorem tax (Latin terms)
Translation: "According to value or per unit of value; that is, divided by the price."

Many states and federal governments tax energy extraction in this manner.

It also refers to taxes: "In proportion to invoiced value of goods." A term used when imposing customs and stamp duty, the duty increasing according to the value of the transaction of goods involved. Pronounced in English as: ad vuh LOH ruhm.

ad verbum
To the word.

This is the Latin equivalent of verbatim. There are several other Latin expressions for "word-for-word"; including: e verbo, de verbo, and pro verbo. These probably referred to the problems of making accurate copies before printing was invented.

ad victoriam
"To victory." More commonly translated into "for victory" which was the battlecry of the Romans.
This entry is located in the following unit: vinc-, vict-, -vince, -vincible, -vincibility + (page 1)
Ad vindictam tardus, ad beneficientiam velox. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Punish slowly, do good quickly."

Motto of Henry I (918-936) who forced the dukes of Bavaria and Swabia to recognize his authority. He protected Saxony against the Slavs by building several fortresses and by creating a powerful cavalry which he used to defeat the invading Magyars on the Unstrut River in 933.

King Henry succeeded in annexing the key Carolingian realm of Lorraine to the east Franconian realm. He is regarded as the actual founder of the German Empire.

Ad virtutem per sapientiam.
Translation: "To virtue through wisdom."

Motto of Castle Jr. College, Windham, New Hampshire, USA.

ad vitam
To or for life.

A legal term found in some wills, meaning, "for use only during a person's life."

Arduus ad solem.
Lifted up to the sun.

Motto of the University of Manchester, Manchester, U.K.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 17)
argumentum ad absurdum
An appeal pointing out the illogical points of view as presented by an opponent; rather than by establishing the merits of one's own position: "Argument to absurdity, or statements the contents of which are not reasonable or that are considered to be ridiculously foolish."
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18) surd-, -surd (page 1)
argumentum ad captandum
An appeal based primarily on arousing popular passions.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18)
argumentum ad crumenam
An appeal based on money or the promise of profit.

A crumena was a leather pouch that held money and was secured by a strap around a Roman's neck; therefore, the meaning of argumentum ad crumenam was an apeal to the pocketbook or an argument based on monetary considerations.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18)
argumentum ad hominem
An argument against the man.

Argumentum ad hominem is an effective rhetorical tactic, appealing to feelings rather than to intellect, or directed against an opponent's character rather than the subject under discussion. Argumentum ad hominem is considered a logical fallacy, in that such an argument fails to prove a point by failing to address it. In "practical politics" and in many a court of law, argumentum ad hominem is considered persuasive.

The same name is given to an argument in which one employs an opponent's words or actions. It has been said that an illustration of the argumentum ad hominem is found in the technique of the defense lawyer who, when at a loss for legitimate arguments, attacks the attorney for the plaintiff, but it is said that this is not the current usage of this phrase in the United States.

This entry is located in the following units: homo-, hom-, hum- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18)
argumentum ad ignorantiam
An argument based on an adversary's ignorance of facts in a controversy.
argumentum ad invidiam
An appeal to envy, jealousy, ill will, or another undesirable human trait.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18)
argumentum ad judicium (a Latin phrase)
1. Translation: "An argument appealing to judgment."
2. Etymology: from Classical Latin argumentum, "argument"; and ad judicium, "to entreat the common judgement of mankind".
This entry is located in the following units: jud-, judic- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18)
argumentum ad misericordiam
An appeal to pity.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18)
argumentum ad populum
An argument appealing to the interests of the populace.
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18) popu- (page 1)
argumentum ad rem
A relevant argument.

An argument concerning the point under discussion.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 18)
argumentum ad verecundiam
An appeal to an opponent's sense of decency.

An argument concerning the point under discussion.

This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group A (page 19)
Clavis ad futura. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Key to the future."

Motto of Greenville Technical College, Greenville, South Carolina, USA.

This entry is located in the following units: futur- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 4)
Cor ad cor loquitur.
Heart speaks to heart.

Motto of Cardinal Newman College, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

Cujus est solem ejus est usque ad coelum.
The person who owns the land owns it all the way up to the sky.
This entry is located in the following unit: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group C (page 5)
Culpa est immiscere se rei ad se non pertinenti. (Latin statement)
Translation: "It is a fault for anyone to meddle in a matter not pertaining to him."
This entry is located in the following unit: culpa- (page 1)
Esto fidelis usque ad finem. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Be faithful even to the end."
This entry is located in the following units: fid-, fidel- (page 2) fin- (page 2) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group E (page 2)
Esto fidelis usque ad mortem. (Latin motto)
Translation: "Be faithful unto death."
Id quod nostrum est, sine facto nostro ad alium transferi non potest.
What belongs to us cannot be transferred to another without our consent.
Monopolia dicitur, cum unus solus aliquod genus mercature universum emit, pretium ad suum libitum statuens. (a legal statement in Latin)
Translation: "It is said to be a monopoly when one person alone buys up the whole of one kind of commodity, fixing a price at his own pleasure."
Nemo tenetur ad impossibile.
No one is bound to an impossibility.

A legal term.

nihil ad rem
Nothing to do with the matter; "irrelevant".
This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group N (page 3) nihil- (page 1)
Per angusta ad augusta (Latin motto)
Through difficulties to honor because sometimes we can not achieve great results without suffering by squeezing through narrow spaces.
Per ardua ad astra.
Through difficulties to the stars.

Motto of the Royal Air Force, U.K.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 3) per- (page 2)
Per aspera ad astra. (Latin motto)
Through adversity to the stars.

Motto of the Canadian Air Force.

This entry is located in the following units: asper- (page 1) Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 3) per- (page 2)
Per scientiam ad salutem publicam.
Through knowledge to public health.

Motto of Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Perseverantia ad finem optatum.
By perseverance to the wished-for end.

A motto of perseverance and steadfastness.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group P (page 4) persever- + (page 1)
Semper ad eventum festinat.
He always hastens to the crisis.
Testis lupanaris sufficit ad factum in lupanari
A lewd person is a sufficient witness to an act committed in a brothel.
Testis lupanaris sufficit ad factum in lupanari.
A lewd person is a sufficient witness to an act committed in a brothel.

A maxim about the legality of testimony.

This entry is located in the following units: Latin Proverbs, Mottoes, Phrases, and Words: Group T (page 3) testi-, test- (page 5)
Ubi non est directa lex, standum est arbitrio judicis, vel procedendum ad similia. (Latin legal statement)
Translated: "Where there is no direct law, the opinion of the judge is to be taken, or references to be made to similar cases."
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “ad
For this purpose only; for this thing, only for a particular reason or occasion; temporary. (1)
Against a person; appealing to personal prejudices or emotions rather than to reasonable statements. (1)
ad inf., ad infinitum
to infinity (endless)
This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 1)
Endlessly; without limit; indefinitely into the future. (1)
ad init., ad initium
at the beginning
This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 1)
ad int., ad interim
in the meantime
This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 1)
Temporarily or in the meantime; for an interval. (1)
ad lib., ad libitum
at will

Literally meaning is "at pleasure". This expression is popularly used as a noun phrase or modifier in English in the form "ad lib" to express absence of planning; for example, "His worst jokes were carefully planned ad libs."

This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 1)
ad loc., ad locum
at the place
This entry is located in the following unit: Abbreviations Frequently Encountered (page 1)
To a degree of disgust or revulsion; something that goes on and on and seems to never stop. (2)
Ad perpetuam rei memoriam.
For the perpetual remembrance of the thing.
This entry is located in the following unit: Graveyard words for a greater understanding of epitaphs (page 1)
ad-lib (verb), ad-libs; ad-libbed; ad-libbing
To improvise all or part of a speech or another kind of performance; that is, to spontaneously say something without prior preparation: Many in the audience noticed that the mistress of ceremonies was ad-libbing her speech at the awards ceremony.
To  improvise words, gestures, etc. that are not in a script.
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This entry is located in the following unit: English Words in Action, Group A (page 3)
To spontaneously say something without prior preparation. (1)