You searched for: “absorption
absorption (s) (noun), absorptions (pl)
1. The taking up of liquids by solids, or of gases by solids or liquids: Judy's mother used a special cloth to facilitate the absorption of the spilled milk.
2. The taking up of light or of its rays by black or colored rays: The absorption of the light by the black cloth seemed to be adequate.
3. The taking up by the body of radiant heat, causing a rise in body temperature: Stanley's higher temperature was caused by the absorption of the heat from the sun when he was at the beach.
4. The reduction in intensity of an X-ray photon as it passes through a substance or a beam of light as it passes through a solution which is used in clinical photometry as well as nuclear methods: At the laboratory the technicians were able to monitor the absorption of the electromagnetic energy as it passed through the blue solution.
5. The passage of a substance through some surface of the body into body fluids and tissues; such as, the passage of ether through the respiratory epithelium of the lungs into the blood during anesthesia or the passage of oil of wintergreen through the skin (which is the result of several processes: diffusion, filtration, and osmosis): Rodney, the anesthesiologist, frequently checked the level of absorption of the ether during the surgery.
6. The process by which a liquid or gas is drawn into the permeable pores of a solid material: The clean gauze bandage slowed the absorption of the blood from the wound.
7. In physiology, the passage of substances across and into tissues; such as, the passage of digested food molecules into intestinal cells or the passage of liquid into kidney tubules: The various types of medical absorptions include: agglutinin absorption, cutaneous absorption, external absorption, intestinal absorption, parenteral absorption, and pathological absorption.
This entry is located in the following units: a-, ab-, abs- (page 10) sorb-, sorpt- + (page 2) -tion (page 1)
More possibly related word entries
A unit related to: “absorption
(Latin: a suffix forming nouns from verbs of condition and action; an act or process: resumption, absorption; state or condition, redemption, exhaustion; something resulting from or otherwise related to an act or process, assumption, friction)
Word Entries containing the term: “absorption
absorption apparatus (s) (noun), absorption apparatuses (pl)
A device, used in measuring gases, that absorbs a gas or some constituent from a mixture and estimates the quantity either from properties of the absorbed material or from the reduced residual volume remaining after absorption: "Mr. Dillman studied the operations manual of the absorption apparatus for three days before he conceded defeat."
This entry is located in the following unit: par-, para- (page 1)
absorption bed (s) (noun), absorption beds (pl)
A large pit used to absorb effluent from a septic tank; usually, filled with coarse aggregate arranged within a distribution system.
This entry is located in the following units: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 2) -tion (page 1)
absorption chiller (s) (noun), absorption chillers (pl)
A device that transfers thermal energy from a heat source to a heat sink through an absorbent fluid and a refrigerant.

Most commercial absorption chillers use lithium bromide (a salt) and water as the fluid pair, with lithium bromide being the absorbent and water the refrigerant.

This entry is located in the following units: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 2) -tion (page 1)
absorption coefficient
A measure of the amount of incident energy that is absorbed per unit distance or unit mass of a substance.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 2)
absorption cycle, absorption refrigeration, absorption cooling
A process within a refrigeration system during which the primary fluid (the refrigerant) and the secondary fluid (the absorbent) mix after the refrigerant leaves the evaporator.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 2)
absorption fading
A variation in the absorption of radio waves propagated through the ionosphere due to changes in the densities of ionization.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 2)
absorption field
A system of trenches filled with coarse aggregate surrounding distribution pipes; used to seep septic tank effluent into the surrounding soil.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 2)
absorption hygrometer
An apparatus used to measure atmospheric humidity, using a drying agent to absorb and then to weigh the amount of water vapor in a known quantity of air.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 3)
absorption lens
In optics, a lens often used in eyeglasses, designed to absorb certain wavelengths in order to inhibit their passage through the lens.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 3)
absorption meter
An instrument used to measure the amount of light transmitted through a transparent liquid or solid by means of a photocell or other light detector.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 3)
absorption modulation (s) (noun); absorption modulations (pl)
In acoustical engineering, a type of amplitude modulation that couples a variable-impedance device; such as, a microphone, to the output stage of a radio transmitter.

Energy is thus absorbed from the transmitter according to the information captured by the microphone.

absorption rate
In building engineering, the amount of water absorbed by a brick or other porous building material, expressed in grams or ounces per minute.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 3)
absorption spectroscopy
A technique for determining the concentration and structure of a substance, by measuring the amount of electromagnetic radiation that the sample absorbs at various wavelengths.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 3)
absorption spectrum
Spectrum of absorption lines produced when light passes through and is partially absorbed by a substance.
This entry is located in the following units: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 3) -um (page 1)
acoustic absorption (s) (noun), acoustic absorptions (pl)
A process in which sound energy is reduced as sonic waves strike or pass through a surface: The engineer worked to develop a plan for better acoustic absorption in the large auditorium.
atmospheric absorption (s) (noun), atmospheric absorptions (pl)
1. The soaking up of radiation by the air and moisture in the mixture of gases surrounding the earth's surface: "In Howard's physics class, two of the students invented a gauge to measure atmospheric absorption."
2. The reduction of the energy of microwaves by the presence of moisture in the gases surrounding the earth: "The static in the skies at night in the local area appeared to cause the atmospheric absorption of the microwaves, which were interfering with the radar system."
This entry is located in the following units: atmo-, atm- + (page 2) sphero-, spher-, -sphere- (page 1)
auroral absorption event
A large increase of electric and radio wave density in the D-level of the atmosphere caused by electron-bombardment of the atmosphere during an aurora or a geomagnetic storm.
This entry is located in the following unit: aurora-, -aurora + (page 1)
colon absorption
The normal absorption of water (important in the conservation of body fluids) and products of bacterial action; especially, in the ascending colon.

Some nutrients and drugs are absorbed by the lower bowel. In humans, cellulose is not digested or absorbed but passes from the body as unchanged residue.

This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 3)
cutaneous absorption, percutaneous absorption
Absorption through the skin.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 3)
dielectric absorption
1. The energy losses in a dielectric medium when the medium is exposed to a time-varying electric field.
2. The undesirable tendency of certain dielectrics to retain a portion of an electric charge after removal of the electric field.
This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 3)
electronic absorption spectrum
Any spectrum produced by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by ions, atoms, or molecules as a result of electron excitation.
This entry is located in the following units: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 58) -tron, -tronic, -tronics + (page 6)
external absorption
Absorption of material by the skin and the mucous membrane.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 4)
gamma gage, gamma-absorption gage
A penetration-type thickness gage that measures the thickness or density of a sample by measuring its absorption of gamma rays.
This entry is located in the following unit: gamma; Γ, γ + (page 1)
mouth absorption
Oral absorption of material.

Some substances, but no nutrients, can be absorbed from the mouth; some drugs; especially, alkaloids, can be absorbed through the oral mucosa.

This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 4)
parenteral absorption
Absorption from a site other than the gastrointestinal tract.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 4)
pathological absorption
Absorption of a substance normally excreted; for example, urine, or of a product of disease processes; such as, pus, into the blood or lymph.
protein absorption
In the digestive process, hydrolyzation of proteins to their constituent amino acids in the walls of the intestines.

They are transported via the portal vein to the liver and then into the general circulation and to the tissues.

Each tissue synthesizes its own form of protein from the amino acids received from the blood.

This entry is located in the following units: proto-, prot- + (page 1) sorb-, sorpt- + (page 4)
small intestine absorption
Absorption of digestive products that occurs in the small intestine; especially, the ileum.

Products of digestion absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract pass into either blood or lymph. The mesenteric veins unite to form the portal vein and to carry such blood to the liver, the mesenteric lymphatics are called lacteals because, during absorption of a fatty meal, the lymph they contain, called chyle, looks milky.

This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 4)
stomach absorption
Absorption of water, alcohol, and some salts through the gastric mucosa.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 4)
visible absorption spectrophotometry (s) (noun), visible absorption spectrophotometries (pl)
The photometric measurement of the wavelengths of observable radiation taken in by a sample and which correspond to electron transitions from the ground state to an excited state: Professor Jess Monroe developed a new visible absorption spectrophotometry device that enhanced the scientific studies in his university classes.

In the teacher's advanced physics program, his students studied the visible absorptions spectrophotometries of light energy.

Word Entries at Get Words: “absorption
absorption
The uptake of water and solutes from the environment by a cell or a multi-celled organism; that is, the movement of nutrients, fluid, and ions across the gut lining and into the internal environment.
This entry is located in the following unit: Biology Terms + (page 1)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “absorption
absorption line
Dark narrow lines that represent absorption of energy at a particular wavelength of light.

Each element on the periodic chart absorbs energy at specific wavelengths of light which looks like a bar code.

This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 1)
absorption nebula
A nebula seen in silhouette as it absorbs light from behind; also, called a dark nebula.
This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 1)
absorption spectrum
The spectrum resulting when light from one source is passed through another material; for example, a tenuous gas.

The result is a series of dark bands crossing the spectrum, known as absorption lines.

This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 1)