You searched for: “able
Abel, able, -able
Abel (AY buhl) (noun)
In the Bible, the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered by his older brother Cain: "Cain talked with Abel his brother; and it came to pass, when they were in the field, that Cain rose up against Abel his brother, and slew him." Genesis 4:8.
able (AY buhl) (adjective)
1. Having enough power, skill, or means to do something; capable: Neil claimed that his cat was able to see in the dark.
2. Having more power or skill than usual; skillful: Joan Gilbert was an able teacher for more than 40 years.
-able (uh buhl; depending on the word to which it is attached) (a suffix that forms adjectives)
A suffix that forms adjectives from verbs and nouns: Crystal's family was very comfortable sitting around the fireplace and listening to the beautiful recorded music.

Do you think you are able to tell the Biblical story of Cain and Abel without becoming uncomfortable about the horror of death by violence?

able (adverb)
1. Having the necessary means, skill, know-how, or authority to do something; usually followed by to: "She is able to hold down a full time job and still have time for her children after school."
2. Physically, or mentally, equipped to do something; especially, because of circumstances and timing.
3. Having the power, skill, money, etc., that is needed to do something: "Matthew will buy a new pickup truck as soon as he is able to do it."
4. Having the freedom or opportunity to do something: "Jim, come and see us as soon as you are able to find the time."
5. Etymology: possibly from about 1375, borrowed from Old French hable, able; from Latin habilis, "easily managed, held", or "handled"; from habere, "to have, to hold".

The h of the Old French and Latin forms was never established in English, although Classical scholars tried to restore it in the 1500's and 1600's.

In the 1400's, habile was refashioned from Latin and is current today as a different form: able in modern use meaning "capable", habile, meaning "skillful". Derivative forms; such as, habilitate retain the h; ability has lost it.

—Special information from
The Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology; Robert K. Barnhart, Editor;
The H.W. Wilson Company; 1988; page 3.
This entry is located in the following unit: habit-, hab-, -hibit; habili-, habil- (page 1)
able (adjective), abler, ablest
1. Having enough power, skill, or means to do something; capable: "A cat is able to see in the dark."
2. Having more power or skill than usual; skillful: "She was an able teacher for more than 40 years."

"He turned out to be an able editor of the newspaper while his wife turned out to be one of the most able lawyers in her firm."

3. Expertly done; effective: "He presented an able speech even though he had just a few minutes to prepare for it."
4. Etymology: from Old French (h)able, from Latin habilis, "easily handled, apt", from habere, "to hold". "Easy to be held"; hence, "fit for a purpose".

The silent h- was dropped in English and resisted academic attempts to restore it in the 16th and 17th centuries, but some derivatives acquired the "h"; such as, with "habiliment" and "habilitate".

This entry is located in the following unit: habit-, hab-, -hibit; habili-, habil- (page 1)
More possibly related word entries
A unit related to: “able
(Latin: power, strength, ability, able; having authority over; rule over, command of)
(Latin: a suffix; expressing capacity, fitness to do that which can be handled or managed, suitable skills to accomplish something; capable of being done, something which can be finished, etc.)
(Latin: suffix; able manner, capably)
(Modern Latin: named for the mythical king Tantalus [who in the Greek myths was tortured by being placed in water up to his chin, which he was never able to drink, whence the word “tantalize”]; because of the element’s insolubility or “to illustrate the tantalizing work he had until he succeeded in isolating this element”; metal)
(The Romans were apparently never able to conquer the northern Picts)
(Latin: a suffix that means "able to [be]"; a variation of -ability)
(Latin: a suffix; can be done, worthy of being, able to be, tending to, capacity for)
(Greek: digestion, able to digest; cook; from "to cook, boil, digest")
Word Entries containing the term: “able
-able (uh buhl; depending on word to which it is attached)
A suffix that forms adjectives from verbs and nouns.
1. That which can be — ed: Enjoyable = that which can be enjoyed.
2. Giving —; suitable for —: Comfortable = giving comfort.
3. Inclined to — ed: Peaceable = inclined to peace.
4. Deserving to be — ed: Lovable = deserving to be loved.
5. Liable to be — ed: Breakable = liable to be broken.
This entry is located in the following unit: -able (page 1)
Word Entries at Get Words: “able
able (AY buhl) (adjective), abler, ablest
1. A reference to someone who is skillful and competent: Rodger's legal case was handled by two able lawyers.

Laureen Logan is one of the ablest lawyers who is qualified to defend Harley in the misdemeanor trial.

2. Descriptive of a physical or mental condition: The starving man was barely able to walk.
3. Having the necessary means to do something: Because of the bankrupt situation in Reginald's country, he didn't know how he would be able to survive during his retirement.
This entry is located in the following unit: English Words in Action, Group A (page 2)